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Woody Ornamentals

Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
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    Abelia mosanensis

    Abelia mosanensis

    Abelia - Fragrant

    Fragrant Abelia has very fragrant pink tubular flowers with white centers that bloom in May and June. The glossy green foliage turns orangey red in fall. Abelia mosanensis is very hardy and easy to grow. This plant was introduced from Latvia.

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    Abelia x grandiflora Rose Creek
    Abelia x grandiflora 'Rose Creek' provides a wonderful presence in the landscape with its plentiful white flowers and red-tinged stems on new growth. 'Rose Creek' Abelia will bloom beginning in May and last through the summer into September.
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    Abelia x zanderi Little Richard
    A spreading, rounded shrub, 'Little Richard' Abelia has glossy dark green leaves that sometimes will be tinged bronze. Provides wonderful white, fragrant flowers through the summer until frost.
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    Acanthopanax sieboldianus Variegatus

    Tropical looking, Variegated Fiveleaf Aralia offers ivory and green large palmate leaves on a tough dry site tolerant low maintenance plant; somewhat spiny. As wonderful plantsman Fred Spicer of The Birmingham Botanic Gardens says, "For your Garden of Pain".  New name to be Eleutherococcus.

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    Acer griseum

    Acer griseum

    Maple - Paperbark

    Few trees are as showy as the Paperbark Maple, with its cinnamon colored exfoliating bark. The fine-textured leaves have 3 leaflets and change from dark green with silvery undersides in summer to shades of red and bronze in fall. Acer griseum makes a neat oval-shaped small tree which fits into both small and large scale landscapes well.

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    Acer pensylvanicum Erythrocladum

    Our native Striped Maple has produced a very rare color variation which was introduced by Spath's Nursery as Acer pensylvanicum 'Erythrocladum'.  The bark of young trees is spectacularly beautiful, in shades of coral and red in the fall, set off by white vertical stripes.  The large "Goose Foot" leaves turn a bright yellow in the fall, and drop off to reveal the bark which intensifies in color as the temperature drops.  A. 'Erythrocladum' is not a long lived tree, and grows best in shady, moist, well-drained forest locations.

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    Acer rufinerve Winter Gold

    'Winter Gold' Snakebark Maple is a small shade loving Asian Maple which is admired for its striking bark color. The green delicate foliage is held on greenish yellow branches in summer. As the leaves turn yellow in fall, the bark takes on colors of orange and gold, set off by vertical white stripes. Acer rufinerve 'Winter Gold' is particularly stunning in winter, where the bark's color deepens to reddish orange on the new growth.

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    Aesculus parviflora

    Aesculus parviflora

    Bottlebrush Buckeye

    Creamy white flowers on Aesculus parviflora appear in summer on long panicles. Bottlebrush Buckeye offers golden yellow fall color. Aesculus parviflora is a wonderful addition to the landscape to attract hummingbirds. Our neighbor nurseryman Dick Karkalits says it is an absolutely foolproof plant for just about any location, and we agree.

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    Aesculus parviflora var. serotina
    Aesculus parviflora var. serotina is a wide spreading, multi-stemmed deciduous slow growing shrub. Very long white bottlebrush flowers appear in summer two to three weeks later than the species. Medium to dark green leaves turn yellow in fall. Serotina Bottlebrush Buckeye is wet site tolerant.
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    Aesculus parviflora var. serotina Rogers

    'Rogers' Bottlebrush Buckeye has long white panicles that bloom even later than A. serotina. Aesculus parviflora var. serotina 'Rogers' is a wonderful J.C. McDaniel selection. These plants are on their own roots. A. parviflora var. serotina 'Rogers' is wet site tolerant, and the best blooming Bottlebush Buckeye by far.

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    Aesculus pavia

    Aesculus pavia

    Buckeye - Red

    The Red Buckeye is named for its striking showy 5" red upright flower panicles, which appear on the ends of its branches in May. Aesculus pavia's foliage is dark green in summer, turning to yellow in early fall. It produces the lustrous brown chestnuts that we all loved as children and squirrels go crazy for them. It can be grown as a very large wide shrub or as a small slow growing tree.

    PRN Preferred:  We have selected for cleaner foliage and showier flowers.

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    Aesculus turbinata

    Aesculus turbinata

    Horsechestnut - Japanese

    Japanese Horsechestnut differs from most other Horsechestnuts in that its late spring flower display is really showy.  The large upright flower spikes are covered with open faced white blooms with large rose and yellow center blotches.  Aesculus turbinata blooms heavily at a relatively young age, and the large compound green leaves are clean all summer.  In the fall, the foliage turns yellow and sometimes shades of orange.  The shiny brown chestnuts appear in the fall, to the delight of various animals and small children.

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    Aesculus x neglecta Erythroblastos

    Aesculus x neglecta 'Erythroblastos'

    Horsechestnut - Sunrise

    Sunrise Horsechestnut is an unusual native ornamental tree which has several seasons of interest.  In early spring the new leaves emerge in striking shades of shrimp pink, looking like little pink parasols.  The foliage matures to light green, topped in late spring by spikes of soft yellow flowers.  In the fall, Aesculus x neglecta 'Erythroblastos' produces the classic shiny brown chestnuts.  Sunshine Horsechestnut is a cross between A. flava and A. sylvatica, introduced by the well known German nursery Spath Baumschulen.

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    Amelanchier laevis

    Amelanchier laevis

    Serviceberry - Alleghany

    Amelanchier laevis has white flowers in early April. The reddish purple fruit of Allegheny Serviceberry is loved by birds. Good reddish orange fall color of Amelanchier laevis makes it a wonderful landscape choice to provide interest for each season. A wet site tolerant plant.

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    Amelanchier x grandiflora Autumn Brilliance®

    Small white flowers of Amelanchier x grandiflora Autumn Brilliance® emerge from pink buds in April. Apple Serviceberry has berries in June that will turn magenta to purple. Its brilliant red foliage brightens up the landscape in fall. A wet site tolerant plant introduced by nurseryman Bill Wandell of Illinois.

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    Arctostaphylos uva-ursi Massachusetts

    'Massachusetts' Bearberry has small shiny evergreen leaves with small pinkish white bell-like flowers in April and May, often followed by red fruits. Arctostaphylos is best in acid soil and sandy, well drained sites.  Grows well in poor infertile soils.  There are large colonies of Bearberry in the NJ Pinelands.  Selected by Bob Tichnor of Oregon from seed collected in Massachusetts. It is also salt tolerant.

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    Aronia arbutifolia Brilliantissima

    Aronia arbutifolia 'Brilliantissima' is a deciduous shrub with white flowers in May. The bright red fruit of this Red Chokeberry ripens in late summer and persists into winter. The glossy foliage turns brilliant red in fall. This plant is wet site and salt tolerant.

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    Aronia melanocarpa Low Scape® 'Hedger'

    Low Scape® 'Hedger' Black Chokeberry ('UCONNAM166') is a selection of our native Aronia, chosen for its compact upright habit. In mid spring Low Scape® 'Hedger' produces a quantity of showy white racemes held above the lustrous green foliage. During the summer the dense habit makes a good choice for short hedges. In the fall the leaves turn striking shades of orange and red, brightening up the landscape for a prolonged period before dropping. Fruit production is limited, but native pollinators benefit. Developed by Dr. Mark Brand and Dr. Bryan Connolly of U. Conn.

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    Aronia melanocarpa Low Scape® 'Mound'

    Low Scape® 'Mound' Black Chokeberry ('UCONNAM165') is an unusual Aronia melanocarpa form produced by Drs. Mark Brand and Bryan Connolly of U. Conn.  Low Scape® 'Mound' performs as a groundcover instead of an upright shrub, so it works well as an erosion control plant as well as an edger.  The green spring foliage is topped by lots of attractive white racemes.  The showy flowers are followed by shiny black fruit in late summer, providing important food for wildlife.  The fall color is a deep red, persisting for several weeks.

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    Aronia melanocarpa Viking

    Aronia melanocarpa 'Viking'

    Chokeberry - Black

    'Viking' Black Chokeberry has glossy dark green leaves which turn a striking red in fall. The white, spring flowers are followed by large purplish black fruit, which birds love (and they are full of anti-oxidants). The site adaptability (Aronia melanocarpa 'Viking' likes both wet and dry conditions) and the suckering habit make it an excellent shrub for reclamation use, as well as an attractive landscape plant. Dr. Mark Brand of Connecticut found this native beauty.

    PRN Preferred:  A good shrub for wetland reclamation plantings, a more compact variety with very large glossy foliage.

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    Asimina triloba Mango

    'Mango' Pawpaw is a slow growing tropical looking tree which bears delicious yellow fruit in October.  The fruit is large and smooth skinned, with delicious soft flesh surrounding a few brown seeds.  All Pawpaws are significant hosts for butterflies and moths, and are still commonly found in patches in old farmyards because settlers depended on Asimina triloba for the delicious fruit.

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    Asimina triloba Overleese

    'Overleese' Pawpaw was found in its native habitat in 1950.  WB Ward selected Asimina triloba 'Overleese' in Indiana for its large, delicious fruit which ripens in early to mid September.  The mahogany three petal flowers are very unusual in appearance and are pollinated primarily by flies (hence the old custom of hanging chicken neck pieces in the trees during the spring blooming season).  The large fruit appears in showy clusters and turns yellow when ripe.

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    Asimina triloba Pennsylvania Golden

    'Pennsylvania Golden' Pawpaw is an early ripening form of our largest native fruit. The flesh is yellow and the taste is reminiscent of mango, banana and pineapple. Pawpaw ice cream is one of the greatest desserts we have ever eaten. Asiminas are important hosts for the larvae of the Zebra Swallowtail Butterfly, as well as the Pawpaw Sphinx Moth. Pawpaws are often found colonizing shady riverbanks along the Mid Atlantic and Southern plains.

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    Asimina triloba Prolific

    'Prolific' Pawpaw has large delicious early ripening fruit in early fall.  The flavor is complex, with hints of banana and mango, resulting in the old common name of 'Poor Man's Banana'.  The 3 lobed hanging flowers in early spring are among the more interesting bloom forms, with 3 fleshy brown petals and a somewhat unpleasant odor (since they need flies and beetles to pollinate them).  The leaves are large and tropical looking.

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    Asimina triloba Rappahannock™

    Rappahannock™ Pawpaw comes from the Blandy Experimental Farm in VA.  It was chosen for its large symmetrical yellow fruit.  The delicious fruit turn yellow when ripe and ripen earlier than many other Asiminas.  Rappahannock™ Pawpaw has the added advantage of being less seedy and firmer texture than many other selections.  A Neal Peterson variety.

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    Asimina triloba Shenandoah™

    Shenandoah™ Pawpaw is a chance seedling of Asimina 'Overleese', with improved flavor and texture. The fruit ripens in mid season (September) and bears fewer seeds than many Asimina selections. The flavor of the large yellow fruit is somewhat similar to a banana custard, and the flesh can be used to make a truly wonderful ice cream. A Neal Peterson introduction.

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    Asimina triloba Sunflower

    'Sunflower' Pawpaw, a somewhat self-fertile variety of a wonderful but under utilized native fruit tree. Asimina triloba 'Sunflower' Pawpaw's yellow fruit is ready in October.

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    Asimina triloba Susquehanna™

    Susquehanna™ Pawpaw is another delicious Neal Peterson introduction.  Like the other Peterson cultivars, Asimina Susquehanna™ is named after East Coast Rivers because the native habitat of Pawpaws is along the margins of rivers.  This Asimina is the largest fruited (fruits weighing up to 1 pound) and latest ripening Pawpaw resulting from Neal Peterson's work.

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    Asimina triloba Sweet Alice

    'Sweet Alice' Pawpaw was found by Homer Jacobs in West Virginia in 1934, and became a common farmyard fruit tree because of its large sweet orange yellow fruit produced in September and early October. The habit is somewhat more compact than some other selections and the fruit set is plentiful. All Pawpaws fruit best when planted near 1 or more other cultivars, because cross pollination between different clones is important for a good fruit set. The interesting purple brown flowers appear in April and May.

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    Asimina triloba Wells

    'Wells' Pawpaw produces its large delicious fruit earlier than many Pawpaws, ripening in September.  The fruits are large green ovals in summer, turning yellow when ripe.  The large seeds are easily removed, and the soft, custard like flesh makes excellent ice cream and puddings.  Pawpaws are a good source of protein, vitamins and minerals, and most farms in the East and Midwest had a "Pawpaw Patch".

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    Asimina triloba Wilson

    'Wilson' Pawpaw was found in the wild in Kentucky.  The fruit is medium to large sized and has golden yellow flesh when ripe in the fall.  The interesting purple brown flowers are produced in early spring and are set all along the branches.  Since all Pawpaws except 'Sunflower' are "self-incompatible", it is best to plant 2 or more cultivars for good fruit set.  The harvest period is fairly long for Pawpaws, as the fruit ripens over a month.

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    Asimina triloba- Multiple Varieties Available

    We grow a broad selection of these wonderful but underutilized native Pawpaws. They are all ultimately 25' and perform best in full sun. Their delicious yellow fruits ripen in September or October and taste like a combination of mango and banana custard. The fruit production is the most prolific when they have a pollinator. The interesting tri-lobed purple brown flowers appear along the stems in mid spring. The beautiful Zebra Swallowtail Butterfly and the Pawpaw Sphinx Moth depend on Asiminas in order to reproduce. Contact us for our cultivar list.

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    Aucuba japonica Emily Rose

    'Emily Rose' Aucuba is a dark green female selection with superior cold tolerance.  The slender lustrous leaves are evergreen , and make a great setting for the large shiny red fruit.  The berries color up in mid to late winter, and are retained well into the summer, providing a log lasting show.  Any male form planted nearby will provide adequate pollination.  Aucuba 'Emily Rose' was an introduction from Hines Nursery of California.

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    Aucuba japonica Hosoba Hoshifu

    'Hosoba Hoshifu' Aucuba is a showy evergreen for shady locations, with long narrow shiny green leaves speckled liberally with bright yellow spots.  'Hosoba Hoshifu' is a female Aucuba, which produces shiny red long lasting fruit when planted near a male form (most green and yellow Aucubas are male).  The fruit is large and very showy as it persists throughout the winter.  Plant in a sheltered spot protected from winter winds and afternoon sun. 

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    Aucuba japonica Mr. Goldstrike

    'Mr. Goldstrike' Aucuba has large evergreen leaves liberally splattered with bright yellow splotches. Often the centers of the leaves are all yellow. Aucuba japonica 'Mr. Goldstrike' is a male form, so it is reliable pollinator of Aucuba japonica 'Female'.

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    Aucuba japonica Rozannie

    'Rozannie' Aucuba is a compact evergreen form which has large, very lustrous green leaves.  They look almost artificial because they are so shiny and perfect.  Even more amazing are the enormous bright red berries which remain on 'Rozannie' for several months.  Since birds (and deer) do not eat the fruit, the show goes on for a long time.  A compact female form, tolerant of a wide range of soils. 

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    Aucuba japonica Variegata
    Aucuba japonica 'Variegata' has shiny green leaves sprinkled with gold spots, and is evergreen. Variegated Japanese Aucuba is often called 'Gold Dust' Aucuba.
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Botanical Name     Common Name
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