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Perennials

Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
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    Acanthus mollis offers unusual pink-mauve flower spikes with white interior petals and purple calyces, held 3' to 4' above deeply lobed large shiny leaves. Bear's Breeches grows best in part shade and in a moist protected spot in the landscape.  Too much shade will result in less or no flowers.  This clump-forming perennial is grown as much for its attractive foliage as for its architecturally bold flower spikes. Native to the Mediterranean region, it flowers in late spring to mid summer with multiple vertical flower spikes.  The leaves were the source of the Corinthian leaf motif developed and used as a decoration in ancient Greek and Roman art and architecture. 

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 6

    The pinkish mauve flower spikes with white interiors of Spiny Bear's Breeches look the same as those of Acanthus mollis, but the leaves look more spiny (they aren't) and the plant is more cold tolerant. This plant makes an amazing show for 2 months in the summer on the north side of our house.  Best sited in part shade and well drained soil.  Spinosus means spiny and comes from the stiff spines found on the margins of the leaves that resemble that of the thistle.  The spiny leaves served as the pattern for the design on Greek Corinthian columns.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 6

    ‘Sassy Summer Sangria’ Yarrow has dark red flat flower clumps on sturdy stems with ferny green foliage. The bloom period is extended through the summer months, especially if deadheaded after the initial flowering. Achillea ‘Sassy Summer Sangria’ has the darkest flower color of Walters Gardens’ ‘Sassy Summer’ series, all of which tolerate poor soils and dry conditions; rich soil tends to make plants tall and floppy.  Pollinators love Achilleas while deer and rabbits do not.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 40 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Sassy Summer Silver’ Yarrow is an introduction by Walters Gardens in their ‘Sassy Summer’ series. The soft yellow flower clumps top tall sturdy stems, so Achillea ‘Sassy Summer Silver’ makes a good cut or dried flower. Like its ‘siblings’, ‘Sassy Summer Silver’ tolerates dry, poor soils and is not attractive to deer or rabbits. Deadheading prolongs the bloom period.

    Height: 28 Inches
    Spread: 32 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Sassy Summer Sunset’ Yarrow has deep orange flat flower chumps on tall sturdy stems. The bloom period extends from mid to late summer, especially if spent flowers are removed. Like the other ‘Sassy Summer Sunset’ series, Achillea millefolium 'Sassy Summer Sunset' is tough and resilient, tolerating dry and poor soils. The unusual color combines well with blues and purples.

    Height: 34 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Sassy Summer Taffy’ Yarrow is another showy member of Walters Gardens’ new Achillea series. The flat flower clusters are a deep pink when newly opened, and they mature to a softer pink which makes a bicolored look. The tall sturdy stems make Achillea ‘Sassy Summer Taffy’ a good cut flower as well as a tough long-lived perennial. Deadhead to prolong bloom period.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Peter Cottontail’ Yarrow has an unusual flowering habit because the white flowers are not in an umbel, but scattered thickly all over the green clump. Achillea ptarmica ‘Peter Cottontail’ looks like a tight ‘Baby’s Breath’ clump, with the advantage of being deer resistant and tolerant of poor dry soils. This Yarrow reblooms well if deadheaded.

    Height: 20 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The bright yellow flat flowers of 'Moonshine' Yarrow appear in mid to late summer above ferny silvery gray foliage. Salt and dry site tolerant, Achillea x 'Moonshine' is a Blooms of Bressingham® selection.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The cobalt blue flowers of Azure Monkshood appear in late summer and early fall. Aconitum carmichaelii 'Arendsii' blooms for a long period, and Dr. Alan Armitage says "it's the best late flowering Monkshood in cultivation."  It gets the common name Monkshood because the upper sepal of each flower develops into a large, helmet-like structure that somewhat resembles the hood worn by medieval monks.  'Arendsii' stems are unusually thick and are less likely to need support than other Monkshood.  All parts of the plant are poisonous. Breed by German nurseryman Georg Arends at his nursery near Cologne.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Upright spikes of uniquely shaped azure blooms of Aconitum fischeri appear mid-August to late October, taking on a tall vertical form in the garden and pairing nicely with other fall blooming perennials that prefer moist conditions. The flowers, which resemble the hoods of medieval monks, are wonderful for attracting many beneficial insects and are a primary food source for Old World bee species. Known for deterring deer, rabbits, slugs, and undesired insects due to its high toxicity. Spent flower spikes can be deadheaded to promote a second bloom, and deeply lobed foliage remains attractive in the fall.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Dwarf Golden Sweet Flag is a wonderful plant for walkways as well as rain gardens and stream edges, because it is tolerant of foot traffic as well as significant moisture. The evergreen foliage is like tiny thick bladed grass tufts and when crushed, it releases an attractive sweet scent. The tufts slowly expand to make a short yellowish green mat. Try massing 'Minimus Aureus' as a groundcover near water gardens to help control erosion.  Although it looks like a grass, Acorus gramineus 'Minimus Aureus' is actually more closely related to the Iris family.

    Height: 4 Inches
    Spread: 8 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Ogon' Sweet Flag has bright yellow stiffly upright leaves that are a vivid addition to a wet site in the shade.  The leaves release a fresh citrus scent when pinched or bruised.  Clumps of Acorus 'Ogon' will get larger with age as they spread slowly by rhizomes.  This Sweet Flag is evergreen so it provides great winter interest.  Brighter light lends more golden color, while deeper shade highlights green.   Introduced into the US by Barry Yinger. 

    PRN Preferred: Both salt and wet site tolerant, ‘Ogon’ adds a yearlong splash of chartreuse to the shade garden.

    Height: 15 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    White Baneberry is also called 'Doll's Eyes' because the small white berries end in a black dot making this native (and toxic) fruit resemble the staring eyes of old fashioned dolls.  The delicate white flower spikes appear above Astilbe-like foliage in spring, followed by the striking white fruit in summer.  The flowers provide pollen but lack nectar.  The pollen is collected by short-tongued bees.  The berries are eaten by a variety of birds, thereby spreading the seed to other areas.  The birds are immune to the toxic effects of the berries.  All parts of this plant are poisonous.  Actaea pachypoda naturalizes easily in moist but well-drained woodlands.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Snakeroot or Cohosh is a spectacular addition to the late summer flower garden with tall, rocket-like spires of ivory white, fragrant flowers which are held high above the green foliage. The bloom period is longer than a month and insects love it (great for nature photographers). Adds architectural height to the shaded part of the garden.  Host plant for Spring Azure. Actaea racemosa is best in moist, shady locations.

    Height: 72 Inches
    Spread: 48 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Branched Bugbane has fragrant white flowers in late summer, over purplish bronze foliage. Try it combined with chartreuse foliaged plants to really make a impact.  By mid summer the leaves take on a green hue. Bees and butterflies love the blooms. Per noted plantsman David Culp, Actaea do very well under Black Walnuts.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4
    'Hillside Black Beauty' Kamchatka Bugbane has white fragrant flowers in late summer that tower over dark purple foliage. A great source of nectar and pollen for insects. The leaf color is particularly intense in early summer before bloom time.
    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Chocoholic’ Bugbane is shorter than other dark purple Actaeas, but what it lacks in stature it makes up for in the beauty of its foliage. The leaves emerge in the spring as a dark bronzy purple and turn more green by mid summer. The fragrant mauve pink flowers age to white on tall flower spikes that tower over the foliage in the late summer, attracting all manner of pollinators. This is particularly attractive when paired with shade tolerant gold foliage plants. Consistent moisture is necessary for the best performance.  It was discovered by Marco van Noort in the Netherlands as a seedling of 'Brunette'.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Anise Hyssop, hailing from the Great Plains, is a wonderful native Agastache for use in more natural settings. Ranging from 2-4’ tall with flowers leaning on lavender in color this wonderful upright perennial will seed around in optimal conditions. Like all other Agastache this perennial is an absolute pollinator magnet.  The foliage is fragrant and has an anise or licorice scent.  Flowers start in late July and continues until late autumn. 

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Golden Jubilee’ Purple Giant Hyssop combines large showy lavender blue flower spikes with stunning yellow foliage. Both the flowers and the leaves are fragrant and attractive all summer, especially if deadheaded periodically. Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’ performs best in well-drained sites, and will self-seed nicely in sunny sites. ‘Golden Jubilee’ is a great addition to perennial gardens and meadows.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Black Adder' Anise Hyssop has prolific deep blue bottlebrush flowers from mid summer to fall. 'Black Adder' is a cross between A. rugosa and A. foeniculum.  Compact habit and excellent hardiness make this a very exciting Agastache. Dry site tolerant with deliciously fragrant foliage. Good drainage is essential for these plants as they will not survive a winter in wet clay soils. They are drought tolerant once established. From Coen Jansen.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 6

    'Blue Boa' Anise Hyssop is an improvement on 'Blue Fortune'.  The large fragrant flower spikes are larger and deeper blue in color, verging on violet.  The foliage is a bright green and wonderfully fragrant when touched.  Agastache x 'Blue Boa' blooms for a prolonged time in mid to late summer, especially when deadheaded after the initial flowers flush.  Although 'Blue Boa' Hyssop has proven itself to be very cold tolerant, it needs excellent drainage to survive our winters.  Introduced by Terra Nova, and winner of a number of Horticultural Awards.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Blue Fortune' Anise Hyssop has blue flowers mid summer to fall, and fragrant foliage. From the Trompenberg Arboretum in Holland. Agastache bloom time is prolonged by dead heading. Loved by butterflies and other insects.  Leaves may be used in potpourris.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Agastache x ‘Pink Pearl’ is an easy growing, drought-tolerant perennial that produces beautiful, dense spikes of fragrant, light pink blooms from early June to late September. The profuse blooms and mounding habit make this cultivar great for planting in the front of a perennial border or in containers, where it will attract hummingbirds and other pollinators throughout its long blooming period.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 6

    The smoky bluish violet racemes of 'Purple Haze' Anise Hyssop start in July and keep going until fall. Agastache x 'Purple Haze' is a real butterfly and bee magnet, from those plant gurus of North Creek Nurseries. Hybridized by Coen Jansen of the Netherlands.   Great for mass planting to create an impressive bluish purple haze in the garden, hence the name.

    PRN Preferred: This fragrant native blooms for a very long period and has an excellent upright flower form.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 6

    The deep purple, nearly black shiny leaves of 'Black Scallop' ('Binblasca') Bugleweed have ruffled edges. Deep blue flower spikes appear on Ajuga in late spring. Great for a shade planting where grass is difficult to establish.  Plant with other shade lovers and spring bulbs for an impressive show.  From Mike Tristram of the UK.

    Height: 3 Inches
    Spread: 6 Inches
    Zone: 6

    The foliage of Ajuga reptans 'Burgundy Glow' is composed of stunning shades of pink, white and purple, with blue flower spikes adding to the show in late spring.  Good for small spaces, containers and rock gardens.

    Height: 3 Inches
    Spread: 6 Inches
    Zone: 6

    'Catlin's Giant' Bugleweed has bronze leaves that are much larger than other Ajugas, sporting spikes of blue flower up to 8" tall in April and May. A rapid-spreading evergreen groundcover.  

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Chocolate Chip' ('Valfredda') Bugleweed has tiny purplish chocolate foliage with violet blue flower spikes in late spring. This Ajuga makes an excellent dwarf groundcover forming a tight mat of foliage around stepping stones. It came to the US from Italy.

    Height: 2 Inches
    Spread: 4 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Cordial Canary’ is in the Feathered Friends™ Series of showy new Ajugas from hybridizer Chris Hansen. Ajuga ‘Cordial Canary’ has lime-green to yellow ground-hugging foliage which is topped in spring by violet blue flower spikes. Like other Ajugas, ‘Cordial Canary’ thrives in light shade. The chartreuse to yellow foliage is semi-evergreen, so the seasons of interest are long. The running habit makes Ajuga ‘Cordial Canary’ a good addition to mixed containers.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Fierce Falcon’ Bugleweed, from Chris Hansen’s Feathered Friends™ Series, produces foliage that is lustrous and such a dark purple that it is almost black. The ground-hugging running habit makes this a great shade groundcover, and Ajuga ‘Fierce Falcon’ is even showier in spring, when the shiny foliage is topped by short cobalt blue flower spikes. Ajuga foliage is semi-evergreen to evergreen, depending on winter conditions, so the running habit of ‘Fierce Falcon’ makes a good addition to mixed pots.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Parrot Paradise’ Bugleweed is part of the Feathered Friends™ series hybridized by Chris Hansen. The foliage is a bright combination of chartreuse, bronze and red, topped by cobalt blue flower spikes in spring. Like other Bugleweed cultivars, Ajuga reptans ‘Parrot Paradise’ is an evergreen groundcover for shady locations. The habit is spreading, so it works well in shade as an erosion controller.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Pink Lightning’ Bugleweed is a departure from most Ajugas in having short mauve pink flower spikes instead of blue in mid spring. The crinkled leaves of Ajuga ‘Pink Lightning’ are an attractive soft green with creamy white edges, and they are colorful almost all year. ‘Pink Lightning’ was a sport found and introduced by Sunny Borders Nursery of Connecticut. A spring nectar source for hummingbirds and pollinators.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 6 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Finally, a beautiful, bright gold Bugleweed to rule them all! A selection from the Feathered Friends™ series, Ajuga ‘Tropical Toucan’ features not only large, electric yellow foliage on reddish stems, but bright cobalt blue flowers from April to June that contrast beautifully in the landscape. ‘Tropical Toucan’ Bugleweed is a fast growing and low maintenance evergreen groundcover, helping to suppress weeds with its spreading, low-growing habit. Besides being deer and rabbit resistant, Ajuga ‘Tropical Toucan’ is also shown to be relatively heat tolerant and is capable of handling full shade.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Thriller' Lady's Mantle blooms in May and June, producing airy delicate chartreuse yellow flowers held above fuzzy bluish green leaves.  'Thriller' has somewhat larger pleated leaves and a more prolific bloom than the species, and like all Alchemilla mollis, the hairy leaves repel rain water so that the foliage has attractive silver water drops on if after a gentle rain.  'Thriller' performs best in shady, moist conditions.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Medusa’ Ornamental Onion gets its name because the green strap-like leaves curl and twist on the ends like Medusa’s hair. The light purple drumstick flowers emerge just above the foliage in late summer and early fall. When the bloom period is finished, you can still enjoy the dry seedheads. Similar in flower color and foliage color to ‘Blue Eddy’, but in a much larger form.  Rich in nectar, the butterflies and bees love it but the rabbits and deer absolutely leave Ornamental Onions alone (so far…).

    PRN Preferred: The twisty curly foliage is attractive all summer.

    Height: 22 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Millenium' Ornamental Onion blooms in July and August, producing lots of 2" purplish lavender round clusters of flowers like drumsticks on 15" stems. The onion scented leaves are glossy and strap-like, making a thick clump from which the long lasting blooms arise.  Very floriferous and strong upright stems make this an exceptional plant and a great addition to rock gardens, perennial borders and containers.   Many insects and butterflies feed off them but deer and rabbits will not touch them. All Ornamental Onions do well under Black Walnuts. Allium 'Millenium' is the product of Mark McDonough's hard work with Ornamental Onions. 2018 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    PRN Preferred:  A long blooming selection with clean foliage, simply stunning in bloom.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Allium x cernuum, or nodding Pink Onion, is a tough deer resistant bulb plant which is crowned by multiple pink flower umbels. The blooms appear above the green strap-like leaves in July and August. These are followed by attractive tan seedheads. The clumps increase in size as time goes on and the bulbs can be divided and spread to make a lovely addition to short meadows in mid summer or try it in tough-to-grow areas, such as hell-strips.  Great on green roofs.  Self-seeds vigorously in the garden.  

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Forescate’ Chives have dark pink to lavender round flower heads held on straight stems above the edible tubular foliage. Alliums bloom heavily in summer and are perfect for sunny locations that have deer problems. Allium ‘Forescate’ is an excellent addition to rock or scree gardens (think ‘Beth Chatto’), and deadheading after the bloom period is a good idea because the schoenoprasum cultivars seed easily.  A slightly taller, darker, more brilliant pink than the species.  Is a effective accent in green roof meadows.  ‘Forescate’ is very attractive to many pollinators. One of Roy Diblik’s favorite Alliums.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 2

    'Snowcap' Chives produces delicate white flowers above tubular foliage in early to mid summer.  The bloom period is prolonged if Allium 'Snowcap' is deadheaded, which also keeps it from seeding itself in flowerbeds.  The leaves are edible (this is a cultivar of edible chives), but are not touched by deer or rabbits.  Alliums are bulbs, so 'Snowcap' is easily divided when dormant.  A Mark McDonough introduction.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Blue Eddy’ Spiral Onion gets its name from its foliage, which is a neat bluish gray rosette of swirly flat blades. Allium senescens ‘Blue Eddy’ produces pinkish lavender ‘drumstick’ flowers above the rosettes in late summer through early fall. When the flowers are spent, they leave behind interesting dry seedheads that are a good addition to dried flower arrangements. Allium ‘Blue Eddy’ is excellent in rock gardens, containers and dry sites. Bred by Mark McDonough.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'In Orbit' Ornamental Onion blooms from June to September, producing large 3" globular flowers of lavender purple.  The "Drumstick" blooms are 16" tall over green, deer repellent foliage.  'In Orbit' Allium is a very attractive cut flower, and the spent flower heads make a lovely addition to dried flower arrangements.  Pollinators flock to all Alliums when they are in bloom.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Lavender Bubbles’ Ornamental Onion has deep purple drumstick flowers in late summer and blooming in masses above the blue green twisty foliage.  The seedheads remain throughout fall. Both the blooms and the leaves are scented and as a result not touched by deer or rabbits. Hummingbirds and pollinators, however, love Allium ‘Lavender Bubbles,’ which provides a good source of food at an important time of year. ‘Lavender Bubbles’ is a good container plant for sunny locations, and a great addition to rock gardens.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Pink Planet’ Ornamental Onion was introduced by Intrinsic Perennial Gardens for its numerous large lilac pink drumstick flowers. Allium ‘Pink Planet’ has blue green flat leaves which are topped by 18” blooms in mid summer. The seedheads turn tan when the bloom season is over, and make interesting dried elements in the fall and winter landscapes. Allium ‘Pink Planet’ was hybridized by Brent Horvath. A good choice for well-drained rock gardens and pollinator gardens.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Windy City’ Ornamental Onion is a showy introduction by Brent Horvath and Intrinsic Perennial Gardens. The globular dark purple flowers are held above the green flat leaves on 18” sturdy green stems in mid summer. The seedheads turn tan in the fall and persist well into winter. They make an attractive addition to dried arrangements. Allium x ‘Windy City’ is a good addition to green roofs, sunny balconies and well drained sunny perennial gardens.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Summer Beauty’ Ornamental Onion produces a quantity of flat refined strap-like leaves in spring, topped by soft pink round umbels on long stalks starting in June. Allium x lusitanicum 'Summer Beauty' continues blooming almost all summer, and the dried round seedheads add interest to the winter landscape as well. Try them spray painted cool colors (as our good friend Simple does), or added to dried arrangements. Roy Diblik of Northwind Perennial Farm loves using ‘Summer Beauty’, and told us he had first seen it thriving in someone’s driveway.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The delicate light blue flowers of Arkansas Amsonia appear in May. It also has stunning orange and yellow fall foliage. A true tough multi-season plant plus Amsonia hubrichtii produces a latex-like sap that deer tend to avoid. This low maintenance native perennial is a slow grower; it may take 1 to 2 years before it's true beauty is revealed.  A showstopper when planted in mass.  Full sun and moist, well-drained soils create the best fall color; however, it will grow in a range of light and soil moisture conditions.  Native to the Ouachita Mountains in central Arkansas, where it was discovered in the early 1940's by Leslie Hubricht. 2011 Perennial Plant of the Year, and Dr. JC Raulston's favorite perennial.

    PRN PreferredExcellent fall foliage display, makes an impact when planted in mass.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Storm Cloud' Blue Star is the prettiest Amsonia we have seen, with large terminal clusters of bright sky blue star shaped flowers set off by almost black stems, the stems are particularly showy as they emerge in the spring, looking like thin black Asparagus.  The narrow leaves open to an attractive dark green.  Amsonia 'Storm Cloud' was found in moist shade in Alabama by those extraordinary plantsmen, Tony Avent and Hans Hansen, and they picked a particularly apt name for this beautiful native.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4
    The medium blue blooms of 'Blue Ice' Blue Star Flower appear in May and June, with the darkest flower color of the Amsonias we grow. Fall foliage color is yellow. Found at White Flower Farm by famed plantsman Michael Dodge. This is one of Stephanie Cohen's favorite plants, and it makes a great groundcover.
    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Native to much of the East Coast and found as far west as the Rocky Mountains and as far south as New Mexico, Anemone canadensis is a fast-growing herbaceous perennial that is known for its rapid, low-growing abilities that make it a suitable groundcover for the naturalized garden. Capable of spreading by rhizome as well as by seed, windflower can become a dense matrix of attractive basal foliage topped by a profuse bloom of white, apetalous flowers with yellow stamens from early May to mid-June. This particular species prefers moist soil conditions, and is tolerant of streambanks, river beds, low meadows, and other wet sites, where it may occasionally become aggressive. Like its cousin, Anemone virginiana, Anemone canadensis deters deer and rabbits. It is the larval host plant for the veiled ear moth, as well as the one-lined Sparganothis moth.

    Height: 14 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Snowdrop Anemone or Windflower blooms in April, with single 5-sepaled white flowers on delicate stems above the dissected green foliage.  The single flowers have showy yellow anthers in the cupped center and are lightly fragrant.  Anemone sylvestris spreads by rhizomes to make an attractive underplanting groundcover, and is an excellent naturalizer in woodland settings.  The lovely flower display is followed by interesting wooly seedheads.  Repeat bloom may occur in the cooler weather of early autumn. 

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Anemone virginiana is a native perennial wildflower known for its chaotic upright flowers of white with yellow stamens that stand 3-4’ tall in the landscape during their late April to June bloom period. This fast-growing, low maintenance Thimbleweed gets its common name from the persistent seedheads, which resemble… you guessed it, thimbles. When left to spread naturally, colonies of Thimbleweed act as a nice protective cover for small mammals and birds. Anemone virginiana does not spread quite as aggressively as its cousin Anemone canadensis, but can establish itself as a wonderful groundcover when allowed to naturalize. Deer and other grazing animals tend to leave this plant alone.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 14 Inches
    Zone: 2

    Cultivated in Britain and part of the popular and profusely blooming Swan Series, Anemone x ‘Dainty Swan’ produces large, two-toned blossoms of white tinged with purple-pink on the reverse side and golden yellow centers, which appear in June and continue into October. Perfect for refreshing the cottage or wildlife garden late in the season. Prized for maintaining its clumping habit, this windflower variety is a great addition to the mixed border or when planted in mass. Flowers can be used for fresh cut arrangements, and should be deadheaded as they fade to promote more blooms.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Anemone x 'Honorine Jobert' is a Japanese Anemone with tall single white flowers, blooming for numerous weeks from late summer into fall. It prefers moist, humus-rich sites, and will make a large clump in time. A vigorous, low-maintenance plant, with dense, compact mounds of basal foliage which grows about 12-18 inches tall, but when in bloom the plants are 3-4 feet tall.  It spreads by shallow creeping rhizomes.  The flowers are visited by numerous bees and butterflies and make a good cut flower. After flowering concludes, rounded seedheads remain at the end of the stems for additional interest.  ‘Honorine Jobert’, was discovered in Verdun, France in 1858.  2016 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Jasmine’ (‘IFANJ’) Windflower is one of the Fantasy™ series of compact, floriferous Anemones. The dark pink single flowers start in August and bloom for an extended period into fall. Anemone Fantasy™ ‘Jasmine’ was bred in the Netherlands, by Innaflora BV, the hybridizers of other Pretty Lady™ Anemones. Introduced in the USA by Plants Nouveau.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 6

    The semi-double pinkish lavender flowers of 'Pamina' Japanese Anemone appear on compact plants. Flowers bloom late summer into fall often extending to first frost.  Planted in mass they make a very display late in the season.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'September Charm' Japanese Anemone has a silvery cast to its tall pinkish rose single flowers. One of the hardiest of the Anemones, it expands gradually to make an impressive group. Fall blooming.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Wild Swan™ ('Macane001') Hybrid Windflower was found in Scotland as a chance seedling at Elizabeth MacGregor's nursery.  She chose it for its outstanding hybrid vigor and its beautiful single white flowers.  The backs of the petals have a light violet strip up the midrib, visible as the flowers move in the breeze.  Anemone x Wild Swan™ will spread to form a large clump and blooms from late summer through fall.  It was named a winner of the 2011 Chelsea Flower show.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Cinderella' Windflower is another compact beauty from the Pretty Lady™ series of Anemones.  The flowers appear in August and September, with thick textured single soft pink petals.  Anemone 'Cinderella'  has thick short flower stems so the blooms do not flop.  Blooming for an extended time in mid summer to early fall, this introduction from Plants Nouveau also produces interesting fluffy white seedheads after flowering.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Pocahontas' Windflower is a lovely compact introduction from the Pretty Lady™ Series of Anemones.  The large double flowers are a bright bubblegum pink, making quite a show in July, August and September.  The blooms are followed by cottony white seedheads in the fall.  Anemone 'Pocahontas' is a heavy bloomer, so it is showy in the front of a mixed boarder and in late summer containers.  The strong stems make 'Pocahontas' a useful cut flower, as well as resistant to flopping.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Red Riding Hood' Windflower is an addition to the Fantasy™ series of Anemones, developed by Yoshihiro Kanazawa of Japan.  The rose red single flowers cover the compact plants starting in late July and continuing into October with the prolonged bloom period and the strong compact habit, Anemone x Fantasy™ 'Red Riding Hood' makes and excellent late summer to fall container plant.

    PRN Preferred: This Japanese hybrid is both an extremely heavy bloomer and a tight compact plant.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Antennaria plantaginifolia is a full sun loving, semi-evergreen native that is perfect for sites with well-draining, rocky soils. Woolly gray stems held above basal rosettes of paddle-shaped foliage produce the namesake fluffy, white flowerheads from April to June, which are a primary source of nectar for the American lady butterfly and are also visited by solitary bees. The life cycles of two different fly species are reliant on the leaves of this plant as a nesting site. Tolerant of poor soils and drought, pussytoes will create an excellent groundcover where many other low-growing perennials may have difficulty.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Perfect for the part-shade cottage or rock garden, this heat-tolerant, low-growing perennial snapdragon boasts sprays of pastel pink blooms from June to mid-September. Antirrhinum hispanicum ‘Roseum’ is a wonderful companion to other, more brightly colored summer-blooming plants, with its fuzzy silver-green foliage and soft, rose pink flowerheads making a show in the garden all season long.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Our native Columbine, Aquilegia canadensis blooms in April and May, producing beautiful downward facing flowers of red and yellow. They hover above the attractive biternate green foliage, and serve as an important source of nectar for hummingbirds on their northern migrations, as well as native pollinators. Aquilegia canadensis seeds itself well in meadows and edges of the woods, and adds a lovely graceful note to spring flower displays.  Columbine prefers partial shade conditions but will tolerate more sun with adequate moisture.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Columbine is an all-time gardener’s favorite for its compact, low-maintenance attitude and unique, bell-shaped flowers. Aquilegia canadensis ‘Corbett’ has all of the red-flowering variety’s best attributes, with the added benefit of light, popcorn-yellow flowers resembling tiny illuminated lanterns overtop of soft, velvety-green foliage, and a mature height of 14-18”. Various bee species as well as Ruby-throated hummingbirds visit the flowers for nectar during its late April to early June bloom period. During summer and into the autumn months, ‘Corbett’ Columbine may sporadically produce flowers at the same time that its attractive seedheads are also visible. This yellow-flowering variety was discovered by Lawrence Clemens and named in honor of the Corbett Historic District in Maryland.

    Height: 14 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Aquilegia canadensis 'Little Lanterns' is a dwarf selection of our native Columbine that has a lot of flower power. 'Little Lanterns' Columbine has downward facing flowers of red and yellow in April and May, a favorite for hummingbirds.  Use this lovely cultivar in open shade gardens, woodland gardens or naturalized areas.  Continue to water plants after bloom for a wonderful groundcover of attractive foliage.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Earlybird™ ‘Purple Yellow’ Columbine has large bicolored flowers with soft yellow center petals and purple spurs. The blooms appear in mid to late spring over attractive delicate foliage. The habit is compact and the big flowers face out and upward instead of hanging down. Aquilegia x Earlybird™ ‘Purple Yellow’ performs best in some shade and cooler temperatures.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Earlybird™ ‘Red Yellow’ Columbine blooms in mid to late spring, producing yellow open petals surrounded by red spurred petals. The flowers face upward and are much larger than the native Columbines. The delicate green foliage of Aquilegia x Earlybird™ ‘Red Yellow’ forms a compact clump and performs best in some shade.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Sun King' Golden Aralia is a very large showy perennial, producing chartreuse yellow compound leaves which hold their striking color all summer. Foliage retains good yellow color throughout summer unless grown in too much shade. The 2' tall white flower spikes appear in late summer, and are followed by purplish black berries. Barry Yinger found this Aralia in Japan (in a department store's garden section!) and brought it to the US. This is a great plant to light up the back of shady perennial beds.

    Height: 60 Inches
    Spread: 48 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Part of the SunFern™ series of Wormwood, Artemisia gmelinii 'Olympia' is strikingly similar to what you would expect out of woodland ferns but for tough, sunny locations. The deeply dissected dark green foliage may well fool the novice into thinking it’s a fern but you and I both know this to be something much weirder and more novel.

    Height: 20 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Silver Mound' Artemisia is one of the most striking examples of silver leaved perennials.  The fine, feathery foliage makes a tight cushiony mound in dry sites, and retains the attractive habit throughout the summer if periodically given a light trim.  Artemisia 'Silver Mound' does bloom periodically, but the flowers are insignificant and should be removed to maintain the silver cushion look.  The low compact size of 'Silver Mound' makes it a good candidate for rock gardens and summer containers.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The silvery gray foliage of GardenGhost™ wormwood is outstanding in the landscape, adding texture and contrast while maintaining its compact, mounding habit. This variety of Artemisia is highly disease and heat resistant, having been bred as an improved version of the ‘Silver King’ variety.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Powis Castle' Wormwood has showy silver foliage with a finely textured appearance, and needs a dry site. The foliage is sharply aromatic.  The hybrid was selected by British gardener A. J. Hancock in the late 1960's, and used to line walls and terraces surrounding the castle.  Sold to promote the National Trust gardens, it was introduced in 1972 by the National Trusts’ Powis Castle in Wales. 

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Miniature Goat's Beard has delicate Astilbe-like spikes of creamy white above deeply cut green foliage, blooming in June. Dr. Alan Armitage feels that Aruncus aesthusifolius is more heat tolerant than the bigger Aruncus, and he's right, from our experience here in New Jersey.  Adequate moisture is necessary, pairs well with ferns and hostas in the shade garden, it can also be used in rock gardens due to it diminutive size.  Miniature Goat's Beard often produces attractive fall foliage in shades of bronze and purple.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Goat's Beard has large white Astilbe-like flowers in June, held well above the plant. It prefers moist, shady locations and it is particularly gorgeous planted in masses.   The flowers attract numerous butterflies, pollinators and bees.  Aruncus dioicus is dioecious (separate male and female plants). Both flower but the male plants are more floriferous having numerous stamens per flower while the female flower has only 3 stamens.  The genus name Aruncus comes from the Greek word for goat’s beard.  Best if pruned back after flowering to promote bushy growth.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Chantilly Lace' hybrid Goatsbeard blooms in late spring and early summer, producing masses of airy creamy white sprays above the attractive green foliage.  Aruncus 'Chantilly Lace' is an excellent addition to shade gardens, with strong vigor and increasing clump size over many years.  This showy native is part of the Proven Winners® perennial program, from Walters Gardens.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 40 Inches
    Zone: 3
    'Misty Lace' Goatsbeard is a cross between A. dioicus and A. aesthusifolius, resulting in a nice compact form with lots of creamy white Astilbe-like flowers in May and June. The intermediate size and reddish stems make Aruncus x 'Misty Lace' a lovely addition to the shade perennial garden. A selection by Dr. Alan Armitage of the University of Georgia, so you know it is happy in the heat and humidity. Likes a moist, humus-rich site.
    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The soft green leaves of Canadian Ginger appear in pairs in spring and are followed closely by weird, hairy, burgundy brown 3-lobed flowers which attracts pollinators such as crawling flies and beetles with its fragrance. It requires high organic matter soil that maintains constant moisture until the plant is established.  Asarum canadense spreads rapidly in forest understory sites.  Ants carry seeds back to their nests dispersing and creating new plants. They are the larval host for the pipeline swallowtail.  Asarum canadense is a great native groundcover that does well in deep shade and is perfect for a woodland garden or to help with erosion control. 

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The lustrous green leaves of European Wild Ginger are evergreen and leathery in texture. The flowers are small, inconspicuous 3 lobed burgundy brown hairy oddities which appear in late spring to early summer. Flowers are pollinated by flies and the roots have a mild ginger scent.   It is a creeping groundcover that spreads well in shady moist sites.

    Height: 8 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The large shiny dark green leaves of Chinese Ginger have heavy silver mottling. The interesting burgundy brown flowers are found beneath the leaves. It is semi-evergreen and slow growing. Prefers a dry site.  Hardy to zone 6 but may overwinter in zone 5 if protected. Best planted with the crown level to the soil, avoid planting this plant too deep.

    Height: 8 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Swamp Milkweed is a great addition to wet sites, stream banks and butterfly gardens.  Fragrant white-to-pink milkweed flowers appearing in July and August on tall, clump-forming plants. The flat cymes are followed by interesting seed pods. Asclepias incarnata is an important Monarch butterfly nectar source and is an important food source for the larval stage of Monarch butterflies.  It tolerates dry sites as well as wet conditions.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Cinderella’ Swamp Milkweed is a great native for bogs, ponds and streams. The small bright pink flowers are produced in showy umbels (flat crowns) from July to early fall, providing an important source of nectar and pollen to butterflies and other pollinators. Besides having an attractive vanilla scent, the blooms of Asclepias ‘Cinderella’ make a good long-stemmed cut flower. Like all Milkweeds, ‘Cinderella’ is deer resistant and an important host for Monarch butterfly larvae.

    Height: 40 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Ice Ballet' Swamp Milkweed produces fragrant bright white milkweed flowers in flat clumps (umbels) in July and August.  An important native host for Monarch butterfly larvae, Asclepias 'Ice Ballet' is an excellent addition to rain gardens, bioswales and moist meadows.  The white latex is repellent to deer and rabbits, so the clumps get larger and showier with time.  The blooms are followed by the classic milkweed pods which release silky white seeds when ripe.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Soulmate' Swamp Milkweed blooms in July and August, producing clumps of fragrant mauve pink flowers.  Asclepias incarnata 'Soulmate' thrives in moist and wet sites, so it works well in rain gardens, bioswales and wet meadows.  Milkweeds are critical for Monarch caterpillars, and many pollinators are drawn to the flowers, Asclepias 'Soulmate' naturalizes well in wet locations because of the airborne milkweed seed production in fall.

    Height: 42 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Common Milkweed is an important host for larval Monarch Butterflies. Asclepias syriaca is native to pastures and open areas, where it thrives in average to poor dry soils. This is a big and rangy perennial which provides mid to late nutrition for many native pollinators when the showy pinkish lavender flower clumps abound. When cut, white sap is extruded which is somewhat toxic.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Lovely orange and yellow flowers in June and July, followed by small spindle-shaped seed pods which when ripe will open to release silky seeds to be dispersed in the wind. Butterfly Weed is an important plant for butterflies, the leaves are a food source for monarch butterfly caterpillars and the flowers are a nectar source for many butterflies.   Typically grows in clumps 1 to 3 feet tall, and is found in dry, rocky open woods, prairies, fields, and roadsides.  It must have a dry site and seeds readily given the right conditions.  This species does not have milky-sapped stems.  Asclepias tuberosa pairs well with other native plants such as asters, coneflowers and ornamental grasses.  Once established Butterfly Weed is very drought tolerant but difficult to transplant due to the large taproot.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Whorled Milkweed is a tough native perennial which serves as a critical food source for all stages of Monarch butterfly development. The delicate white umbel shaped fragrant flowers appear from June through autumn, on top of the narrow leaves.  Asclepias verticillata is one of the last milkweeds to go dormant, making it a valuable late season food source for Monarch butterflies and their caterpillars.  The common name ‘Whorled’ refers to the way the leaves circle the stems. Because of Asclepias verticillata’s white sap, Whorled Milkweed is not eaten by deer or rodents. The silky seeds are released in fall from the pods (also useful in dried flower arrangements).  The fall foliage color is yellow.  This species will colonize to form a large patch.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The soft blue flowers of 'Wood's Light Blue' Fall Aster appear on disease resistant foliage in August to September.  Bred for compact habit, long bloom period and heavy flowering; it eventually forms a large mat.  An important source of late season nectar and pollen for bees and butterflies. Try it in the front of a perennial boarder of a container.  Hybridized by Ed Wood in Portland, Oregon.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Wood's Pink' Fall Aster has dark pink flowers with yellow centers over disease resistant foliage. It blooms August to September and forms a large mat eventually. One of the Wood's series, and an Aster which will eventually spread to make a large patch.   'Wood's' selections have shown excellent resistance to mildew and rust.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Wood's Purple' Fall Aster has magenta purple flowers with yellow centers, disease resistant foliage, and blooms August to September. Forms a large mat eventually. Genus name comes from the Latin word aster meaning star for the shape of the flowers. One of the Wood's hybrids.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Avondale’ Blue Wood Aster is a late blooming native, producing lots of small light blue daisies with yellow to burgundy centers. Aster cordifolius ‘Avondale’ starts blooming in late August and lights up woodland margins and meadows well into fall. Unlike most other Asters, ‘Avondale’ is relatively deer resistant. The nectar and pollen are both important sources of food for butterflies and native pollinators and the seeds are loved by sparrows and thrushes. Introduced by North Creek Nurseries. (New name is Symphyotrichum cordifolium).

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Eastern Star' White Wood Aster is shorter than the species and has dark burgundy stems to set off the white daisy-like flowers better. 'Eastern Star' is a low mounding perennial that blooms in September and October.  White Wood Aster tolerates a wide range of soil types and handles dappled shade to full shade.  Plants form colonies from underground rhizomes and tend to self-seed.  Aster divaricatus 'Eastern Star' is a host plant for Pearl Crescent and Checkerspot caterpillars and its winter seeds are enjoyed by songbirds, like goldfinches and juncos.  Found by Roger Rache in a coastal Rhode Island native population, it was first introduced by Canyon Creek Nursery, later grown in our region by Northcreek Nurseries (new name is Eurybia divaricata).

    PRN Preferred:  More compact than the species, flowers even in dry shade.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Aster ericoides ‘Bridal Veil’ is a no-fuss, profuse fall-blooming native perennial that will steal the show from August to October! Stunning, dense clusters of small, white, daisy-like blooms with brownish-yellow centers blanket the multi-branched stems throughout its fall bloom period, inviting a plethora of bees, butterflies, and other pollinator species to delight in the late season nectar. The blooms tend to be so numerous that they completely cover the small, finely textured foliage, which gives almost a bright green, lavender-esque quality to the landscape when not in bloom. It is this delicate, tiny foliage that gives this plant its common name, Heath Aster, for resembling the similarly shaped foliage of Erica (Heath). This plant is tolerant of drought once established, and makes for an excellent addition to the gravel or rock garden. (New name is Symphyotrichum ericoides 'Bridal Veil').

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 40 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Snow Flurry’ White Heath Aster is a native groundcover which performs beautifully in late summer and early fall. The short sturdy stems become covered with white daisy-like flowers which attract pollinators and songbirds. Because of its vigorous stoloniferous habit, Aster ericoides ‘Snow Flurry’ makes a good erosion control choice. The species name ‘ericoides’ refers to the heather-like appearance. (New name is Symphiotricum ericoides ‘Snow Flurry’).

    Height: 8 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Bluebird' Smooth Aster has lots of showy bluish violet flowers in late summer and early fall over clean foliage. 'Bluebird' is a great introduction from the Mt. Cuba Center in Delaware. Ranked as the #1 Aster in an evaluation study at Mt. Cuba Center. Strong stems do not need staking if cutback somewhat in June.  Carl Hesselein's favorite Aster for flower color, disease-free foliage and upright stature in the garden.  (New name is Symphyotricum laeve.)

    PRN Preferred:  Tons of flowers with no staking required. Winner!

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Lady in Black' Calico Aster is an unusual native Aster because the foliage is just as showy as the flower display.  The narrow leaves start the summer as a deep plum or purple, gradually changing to bronze when 'Lady in Black' blooms in late summer and early fall.  It becomes covered with delicate white daisies with rosy pink centers, complimenting the dark foliage and attracting all types of butterflies and other pollinators.  The open habit can be improved by cutting plants back to 6" in June.  This native selection was found in Holland. (New name is Smyphyotrichum lateriflorum.)

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 3

    This naturally occurring hybrid of A. spectabilis and A. macrophylla makes a wonderful addition to a wilder looking garden. Lavender blue flowers cover a rosette of large (for asters) heart shaped leaves in fall time. ‘Twilight’ Big Leaf Aster can handle some shade but best flower production is in moist but well drained full sun locations.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Aster novae-angliae 'Alma Potschke' is a New England Aster with showy deep pinkish rose flowers appearing in late summer and early fall.  The habit is tall, like the native species which lights up the autumn New England Llandscape, but the vibrant fushsia pink color really stands out.  Asters provide a nectar source for butterflies as well as a host plant for their larvae. (New name is Symphyotricum novae-angliae).

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The stunning deep purple daisy flowers of 'Purple Dome' New England Aster appear in August on compact upright plants. A wonderful introduction from a wonderful plantsman, Dr. Richard Lighty, and the Mt. Cuba Center.  Asters naturally grew in moist prairies and meadows in the eastern US thriving in full sun.  Great for erosion control and pollinators love it.  Pinch back stems before mid summer to promoter fuller more floriferous plants, this will also control the height and prevent if from flopping.  Can self-seed so it is best to cutback after flowering to prevent seedling varieties in the garden.  New England Aster is a larval host to the Pearl Crescent Butterfly caterpillar and the Checkerspot Butterfly caterpillar.  It provides nectar for bees, hoverflies, skippers, and butterflies and is especially important as a late-season nectar source for migrating butterflies. (New name is Symphyotricum novae-angliae.)

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3
    'Vibrant Dome' New England Aster is similar in habit to its parent 'Purple Dome', but is somewhat taller, with large brilliant pink flowers in August and September. The other parent is thought to be 'Alma Potschke', and it was found in a garden as a spontaneous seedling. Introduced by our pals at North Creek (New name is Symphyotricum novae-angliae).
    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'October Skies' Aromatic Aster has medium blue flowers in September and October. 'October Skies' is tolerant of dry, poor soil sites. Plants form low mounding colonies from underground rhizomes. 'October Skies' blooms about 2 weeks earlier than 'Raydon's Favorite'.  Loved by butterflies, bees and other pollinators and an important addition to the garden for late fall gardens.  A Primrose Path introduction (New name is Symphyotricum oblongifolium).

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Masses of delicate clear blue flowers appear on 'Raydon's Favorite' Aromatic Aster in September and October. 'Raydon's Favorite' is tolerant of dry, rocky sites which makes sense because it was found in San Antonio, Texas by Raydon Alexander.  Aromatic Aster is adaptable to a wide range of soil conditions and can tolerate heat, pollution, and soil compaction.  Since it's foliage is fragant it is usually left alone by rabbits, rodents, and  deer.  One of famed plantsman, Rick Darke's favorites (New name is Symphyotricum oblongifolium).

    PRN Preferred:  A consistantly excellent performer.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Aster tataricus 'Jin-dai' is a Tatarian Daisy with bluish lavender flowers with yellow centers which bloom from September through November. A. 'Jin-dai' sports large tropical leaves all summer. Found in Japan by Rick Darke and Skip March.  It was discovered at the Jin-Dai Botanical Garden in Tokyo, Japan.  It grows shorter than the species, which can reach 7-8 ft. in height.  Tatarian Daisy can rapidly spread by rhizome. An exceptional long-blooming, dramatic perennial; looks great in combination with ornamental grasses and Solidago varieties.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Dwarf Chinese Astilbe has pinkish lavender flowers in July, and blooms later than most Astilbes. 'Pumila' is a dwarf plant which spreads more quickly than most other Chinese Astilbes, eventually making a large mat, and tolerates drier sites than many Astilbes.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Visions' Chinese Astilbe has vivid pink flowers in July, over attractive lustrous foliage, Chinese Astilbe blooms later than the Arendsii hybrids.

    PRN Preferred:  Better drought tolerance than most other Astilbes, perfect choice for dry shade.  Compact variety.

    Height: 14 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Visions in Pink’ Chinese Astilbe has upright soft pink flower spikes in June and July. Because of the density of the blooms, the flower display is very impressive. Astilbe chinensis cultivars have lustrous dark green foliage, and are more dry site tolerant than earlier flowering Astilbes. The excellent deer resistance makes this a wonderful addition to the woodland garden.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Visions in White' Chinese Astilbe blooms in June and July, producing dense creamy white spikes over glossy green foliage.  'Visions in White' is exciting because of its good tolerance for drier conditions.  Like other Astilbe chinensis cultivars, 'Visions in White' extends the bloom time for Astilbes into early summer.  Excellent for shade gardens and woodland edges.

    Height: 28 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The tall purple flowers of 'Purple Candles' Chinese Astilbe appear in June. Late blooming and relatively dry site tolerant.   Chinese Astilbe varieties are noted for having better sun and drought tolerance than most x arendsii hybrids. Flower stalks can remain for additional ornamental interest in the garden.

    PRN Preferred:  Very tall flower spikes, more drought tolerant.

    Height: 40 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Delft Lace' Astilbe is a very beautiful newcomer to the Plume Flower scene, with dark pinkish salmon buds which open up to fragrant apricot pink delicate plumes, set off by contrasting red stems. The dissected foliage is also attractive, with a silvery overlay on the bluish green leaves. It blooms in June and makes an awesome show.

    PRN Preferred: The delicate dissected leaves and the colorful flowers are tougher and longer lasting than those of most other Astilbes.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Bridal Veil’ Hybrid Astilbe blooms throughout May, with lots of gracefully arching white plumes held above light green fern-like foliage. Astilbe 'Bridal Veil’ is a good addition to a small shade garden, or is lovely in masses in woodland landscapes.  Astilbe x arendsii are hybrids, the result of crosses between Astilbe Chinensis, Astilbe Japonica, Astilbe thunergii, and Astilbe astilboides. These hybrids were developed in Germany by George Arends in the 1920s.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Deutschland' Hybrid Astilbe has lots of white flowers in May and June above light green leaves. A vigorous selection for shady spots, with a strong delightful fragrance.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Erika' Hybrid Astilbe has tall light pink plumes in May and June on reddish stems, bronzy new growth, and an upright habit.   An excellent cut flower that lasts and lasts in the vase.

    Height: 32 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Fanal’ Hybrid Astilbe has arching plumes of deep red flowers in June. The bronzy green foliage clumps have delicate dissected leaves, out of which come the upright flower stems. Astilbe x ‘Fanal’ does best in moist cool sites, and makes a good cut flower.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The plumes of 'Peach Blossom' Hybrid Astilbe are peach with pink undertones in May and June over medium green foliage.  In general, Astilbes are long-lived perennials that are most comfortable when grown in rich soil and light shade to filtered sun. They will grow in full shade, but will not bloom as prolifically there.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Red Sentinel' Hybrid Astilbe has red flowers in May and June on red stems over dark green foliage. A dependable heavy bloomer.  Perfect in a shady spot with dappled light; prefers moisture so water regularly for abundant flowers and nice foliage.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Rheinland' Hybrid Astilbe has fluffy clear pink blooms in May and June over a mound of lush green foliage, adding a light, airy quality.  A tough, reliable Astilbe.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The dense upright plumes of snow white flowers of 'White Gloria' ('Weisse Gloria') Hybrid Astilbe appear in May and June over dark green foliage. Extremely showy in a mass.  It is resistant to rabbits and deer, but attractive to butterflies. 

    Height: 28 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    White Astilboides has tall large Astilbe-like white flowers in June, over huge round dramatic leaves that resemble lily pads.  Leaves can grow to 2-3' in diameter, and have a have table-like surfaces, hence the species name.  Astilboides tabularis pairs well with ferns and hostas.  This hard to find plant will be sure to make a statement in any garden.  Prefers moist sites.  It used to be classified as a Rodgersia.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5
Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL