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Rain Garden Plants Plants

Success! The following plants match your search request. We've included all matches below. Click on any plant to learn additional details.

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Dwarf Golden Sweet Flag

Acorus gramineus 'Minimus Aureus'

Dwarf Golden Sweet Flag is a wonderful plant for walkways as well as rain gardens and stream edges, because it is tolerant of foot traffic as well as significant moisture. The evergreen foliage is like tiny thick bladed grass tufts and when crushed, it releases an attractive sweet scent. The tufts slowly expand to make a short yellowish green mat. Although it looks like a grass, Acorus gramineus 'Minimus Aureus' is actually more closely related to the Iris family.

H: 4 Inches  ·   S: 8 Inches  ·   Zone: 5


Sweet Flag

Acorus gramineus 'Ogon'

'Ogon' Sweet Flag has bright yellow stiffly upright leaves that are a vivid addition to a wet site in the shade. The clumps of Acorus 'Ogon' get larger with age. This Sweet Flag is evergreen so it provides great winter interest. Introduced into the US by Barry Yinger. Per Diane Guidone formerly of Rumson, NJ, Acorus withstood salt inundation in the recent hurricanes really well.

H: 15 Inches  ·   S: 12 Inches  ·   Zone: 5


Arkansas Amsonia

Amsonia hubrichtii

The delicate light blue flowers of Arkansas Amsonia appear in May. It also has stunning orange and yellow fall foliage. This tough multi-season plant can handle a broad range of site conditions. 2011 Perennial Plant of the Year, and Dr. J.C. Raulston's favorite perennial.

H: 36 Inches  ·   S: 36 Inches  ·   Zone: 5


Bluestar

Amsonia tabernaemontana 'Storm Cloud'

Sky blue flower clusters top black stems and willowy green foliage, blooms in May and early June. Early stems look like black Asparagus.

H: 24 Inches  ·   S: 36 Inches  ·   Zone: 4


Bushy Bluestem

Andropogon glomeratus

Warm season grass with silvery pink, fluffy, brush-like inflorescences and following seedheads starting in September and persisting through much of winter into February or March. Strappy blue-green leaf blades turn a nice bronzy-orange in autumn and remain colorful into the winter. Showy seedheads are good for dried or fresh arrangements. Prefers moist to wet soil conditions. Tolerant of black walnut and air pollution.

H: 60 Inches  ·   S: 30 Inches  ·   Zone: 5


Broom-sedge/Beardgrass

Andropogon virginicus

Broom-sedge or Beardgrass is a tough native grass that adds great beauty to sterile, dry meadows and open fields. The green upright stems take on shades of reddish burgundy in September, as they are coming into flower. The seedheads are an airy silver displayed all along the grass stems, and are particularly stunning when backlit by afternoon light. The fall and winter color of the strong upright stems is a bright ornage tan

H: 36 Inches  ·   S: 24 Inches  ·   Zone: 5


Windflower

Anemone canadensis

A lovely North American native perennial known for producing a prolific bloom of bright white, five-petaled flowers with golden yellow stamens from April to June, often reblooming sporadically throughout the summer. Attractive basal clumps of deeply lobed, medium green foliage can spread rapidly by rhizome in the landscape. Tolerant of partial shade and resistant to deer.

H: 14 Inches  ·   S: 24 Inches  ·   Zone: 3


Columbine

Aquilegia canadensis 'Little Lanterns'

Aquilegia canadensis 'Little Lanterns' is a dwarf selection of our native Columbine that has a lot of flower power. 'Little Lanterns' Columbine has downward facing flowers of red and yellow in April and May, a favorite for hummingbirds.

H: 16 Inches  ·   S: 12 Inches  ·   Zone: 3


Black Chokeberry

Aronia melanocarpa Ground Hug® PP31821

Clusters of white flowers over green leaves in May. Black edible fruit followed by red and orange fall color. Dense groundcover.

H: 1 Feet  ·   S: 3 Feet  ·   Zone: 3


Black Chokeberry

Aronia melanocarpa Low Scape Hedger® PP28831

Low Scape Hedger® Black Chokeberry ('UCONNAM166') is a selection of our native Aronia, chosen for its compact upright habit. In mid spring Low Scape Hedger® produces a quantity of showy white racemes held above the lustrous green foliage. During the summer the dense habit makes a good choice for short hedges. In the fall the leaves turn striking shades of orange and red, brightening up the landscape for a prolonged period before dropping. Fruit production is limited, but native pollinators benefit. Developed by Dr. Mark Brand and Dr. Bryan Connolly of U. Conn.

H: 5 Feet  ·   S: 3 Feet  ·   Zone: 3


Black Chokeberry

Aronia melanocarpa Low Scape Mound® PP28789

Low Scape Mound® Black Chokeberry ('UCONNAM165') is an unusual Aronia melanocarpa form produced by Drs. Mark Brand and Bryan Connolly of U. Conn. Low Scape Mound® performs as a groundcover instead of an upright shrub, so it works well as an erosion control plant as well as an edger. The green spring foliage is topped by lots of attractive white racemes. The showy flowers are followed by shiny black fruit in late summer, providing important food for wildlife. The fall color is a deep red, persisting for several weeks.

H: 2 Feet  ·   S: 2 Feet  ·   Zone: 3


Black Chokeberry

Aronia melanocarpa 'Viking'

'Viking' Black Chokeberry has glossy dark green leaves which turn a striking red in fall. The white, spring flowers are followed by large purplish black fruit, which birds love (and they are full of anti-oxidants). The site adaptability (Aronia melanocarpa 'Viking' likes both wet and dry conditions) and the suckering habit make it an excellent shrub for reclamation use, as well as an attractive landscape plant. Dr. Mark Brand of Connecticut found this native beauty.

H: 6 Feet  ·   S: 6 Feet  ·   Zone: 4


Goat's Beard

Aruncus dioicus

Goat's Beard has large white Astilbe-like flowers in June, held well above the plant. It prefers moist, shady locations and is particularly gorgeous planted in masses.

H: 48 Inches  ·   S: 24 Inches  ·   Zone: 5


Swamp Milkweed

Asclepias incarnata

Swamp Milkweed is a great addition to wet site gardens, with fragrant white-to-pink milkweed flowers appearing in July and August. The flat cymes are followed by interesting seed pods. Asclepias incarnata is an important Monarch butterfly food source, and it tolerates dry sites as well as wet conditions.

H: 36 Inches  ·   S: 24 Inches  ·   Zone: 3


Swamp Milkweed

Asclepias incarnata 'Cinderella'

Bright pink cymes on tall stalks of green leaves appear in July and August. Fragrant, wet site tolerant and deer resistant.

H: 40 Inches  ·   S: 24 Inches  ·   Zone: 3


Swamp Milkweed

Asclepias incarnata 'Ice Ballet'

White flat flower clumps are held above green lance shaped leaves in July and August. Wet site tolerant and an important food source for Monarch butterfly larvae.

H: 36 Inches  ·   S: 24 Inches  ·   Zone: 3


Swamp Milkweed

Asclepias incarnata 'Soulmate'

Fragrant mauve pink flower clumps on tall stems of narrow green leaves, blooms in July and August. Wet site tolerant and attracts numerous pollinators.

H: 42 Inches  ·   S: 24 Inches  ·   Zone: 3


Butterfly Weed

Asclepias tuberosa

Lovely orange and yellow flowers in June and July, followed by small milkweed pods. Butterfly Weed is an important food source for Monarch butterflies in particular. Must have dry site, seeds well on sunny slopes or gravelly sites.

H: 24 Inches  ·   S: 24 Inches  ·   Zone: 3


Calico Aster

Aster lateriflorus 'Lady in Black'

'Lady in Black' Calico Aster is an unusual native Aster because the foliage is just as showy as the flower display. The narrow leaves start the summer as a deep plum or purple, gradually changing to bronze when 'Lady in Black' blooms in late summer and early fall. It becomes covered with delicate white daisies with rosy pink centers, complimenting the dark foliage and attracting all types of butterflies and other pollinators. The open habit can be impproved by cutting plants back to 6" in June. This native selection was found in Holland. (New name is Smyphyotrichum lateriflorum.)

H: 30 Inches  ·   S: 36 Inches  ·   Zone: 3


New England Aster

Aster novae-angliae 'Alma Potschke'

Rose pink daisy-like flowers cover tall green stems and foliage in August and September. Makes a good choice for erosion control because of stoloniferous habit.

H: 36 Inches  ·   S: 24 Inches  ·   Zone: 3


New England Aster

Aster novae-angliae 'Purple Dome'

The stunning deep purple daisy flowers of 'Purple Dome' New England Aster appear in August on compact upright plants. A wonderful introduction from a wonderful plantsman, Dr. Richard Lighty, and the Mt. Cuba Center (New name is Symphyotricum novae-angliae).

H: 24 Inches  ·   S: 18 Inches  ·   Zone: 3


New England Aster

Aster novae-angliae 'Vibrant Dome' PP19538

'Vibrant Dome' New England Aster is similar in habit to its parent 'Purple Dome', but is somewhat taller, with large brilliant pink flowers in August and September. The other parent is thought to be 'Alma Potschke', and it was found in a garden as a spontaneous seedling. Introduced by our pals at North Creek (New name is Symphyotricum novae-angliae).

H: 30 Inches  ·   S: 24 Inches  ·   Zone: 3


Lady Fern

Athyrium filix-femina

Lady Fern has green lacy foliage, and is a deciduous clump. It is relatively sun tolerant, in spite of its fine foliage. A good filler for moist woodland gardens.

H: 24 Inches  ·   S: 18 Inches  ·   Zone: 5


Lady Fern

Athyrium filix-femina 'Lady In Red'

The medium green delicate foliage of 'Lady in Red' Lady Fern is set off by deep red stems for a striking effect. A deciduous clump.

H: 24 Inches  ·   S: 18 Inches  ·   Zone: 5