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Pleasant Run Nursery Plant Library - (WHOLESALE ONLY)

Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
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    Fragrant Abelia has very fragrant pink tubular flowers with white centers that bloom in May and June. The glossy green foliage turns orangey red in fall. Abelia mosanensis is very hardy and easy to grow.  It is prized for its fragrance and may be used as a hedge.  This species is more winter hardy than other Abelias and that's a good thing because it blooms on old wood. This plant was introduced from Latvia. (New name is Zabelia tyaihyonii).

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Abelia x grandiflora 'Rose Creek' provides a wonderful presence in the landscape with its plentiful fragrant white flowers and red-tinged stems on new growth. 'Rose Creek' Abelia will bloom beginning in May and last through the summer into September.  Blooms on new wood.  Named ‘Rose Creek’ in reference to a creek of the same name located in Oconee County, Georgia.  An introduction by Dr Michael Dirr. (New name is Linnaea × grandiflora 'Rose Creek'.)

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 6

    A spreading, rounded shrub, 'Little Richard' Abelia has glossy dark green leaves that sometimes will be tinged bronze. Provides wonderful white, fragrant flowers through the summer until frost.  The blooms attract numerous butterflies (New name is Zabelia dielsii 'Little Richard'). 

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Acanthus mollis offers unusual pink-mauve flower spikes with white interior petals and purple calyces, held 3' to 4' above deeply lobed large shiny leaves. Bear's Breeches grows best in part shade and in a moist protected spot in the landscape.  Too much shade will result in less or no flowers.  This clump-forming perennial is grown as much for its attractive foliage as for its architecturally bold flower spikes. Native to the Mediterranean region, it flowers in late spring to mid summer with multiple vertical flower spikes.  The leaves were the source of the Corinthian leaf motif developed and used as a decoration in ancient Greek and Roman art and architecture. 

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 6

    The pinkish mauve flower spikes with white interiors of Spiny Bear's Breeches look the same as those of Acanthus mollis, but the leaves look more spiny (they aren't) and the plant is more cold tolerant. This plant makes an amazing show for 2 months in the summer on the north side of our house.  Best sited in part shade and well drained soil.  Spinosus means spiny and comes from the stiff spines found on the margins of the leaves that resemble that of the thistle.  The spiny leaves served as the pattern for the design on Greek Corinthian columns.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Few trees are as showy as the Paperbark Maple, with its cinnamon colored exfoliating bark. The fine-textured leaves have 3 leaflets and change from dark green with silvery undersides in summer to shades of red and bronze in fall. Acer griseum makes a neat oval-shaped small tree which fits into both small and large scale landscapes well.  Originating from Central China, Paperbark Maple prefers full sun to partial shade in moist, well-drained soil. It will grow in a variety of soil types, including sand, loam, or clay and is adaptable to a variety of pH levels. One of the last Maples to develop fall color and the leaves persist into winter. 

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Armstrong Gold® ('JFS-KW78') Columnar Red Maple comes from the extensive selection work done at J Frank Schmidt's nursery in Oregon.  Acer rubrum Armstrong Gold® has bright golden orange fall foliage on a very tight upright form.  The branches grow at a steep, upward angle.  Besides having good tolerance for a wide range of environmental conditions (as do Red Maples in general), Armstrong Gold® makes an excellent street tree because of the dense columnar form.  The tiny red flowers appear in April and are followed by red winged samaras (seeds).

    Height: 40 Feet
    Spread: 12 Feet
    Zone: 4

    October Glory® Red Maple has green leaves following the attractive red flowers which are one of the earliest signs of spring for us in the Northeast. The fall color of October Glory® is a deep rich red and occurs 2 weeks later than other cultivars. The glossy dark green leaves with red stems have 3-5 lobes and are 3-6” across.  This plant species plays larval host to the coral hairstreak butterfly.  October Glory® is an oval-shaped, wet site tolerant tree that was found by our father, William Flemer III and has proved to be one of the best cultivars for southern hot summers.

    Height: 40 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Redpointe® ('Frank Jr') Red Maple is an attractive introduction of this very adaptable native tree, developed by J Frank Schmidt and Son Nursery in Oregon.  They chose this selection because of its broad but upswept branching pyramidal habit.  Acer rubrum Redpointe® has a strong central leader and leathery dark green foliage.  The crowning glory is the vivid red early fall color, followed by a regular tidy silhouette in winter.  One of the fastest growing Red Maples in the marketplace.

    Height: 45 Feet
    Spread: 30 Feet
    Zone: 4

    ‘Green Mountain’ Sugar Maple comes from William Flemer III of Princeton Nurseries, from an original outstanding tree found by him in Vermont. Acer saccharum ‘Green Mountain’ is probably a hybrid between the Northern and Southern (nigrum) Sugar Maples, exhibiting both good heat and drought tolerance. ‘Green Mountain’ has a very regular oval silhouette and very showy orange to yellow fall color. With its superior heat tolerance and hybrid vigor, ‘Green Mountain’ can be used in urban situations as long as there is a good amount of soil for the roots.

    Height: 70 Feet
    Spread: 45 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Acer saccharum Legacy® is a large, oval shade tree prized for the fiery red and orange autumn colors that adorn its dense crown of foliage. This sugar maple is tolerant of drought conditions, and its thick, glossy leaves are resistant to tattering caused by wind, as well as leafhopper damage. Utilized both for its ornamental value in the landscape as well as for the syrup produced by its sap, this particular cultivar of sugar maple is a fast grower and great for use as a specimen tree, shade tree, or street tree where it will not interfere with electrical wires or be heavily impacted by salt spray.

    Height: 50 Feet
    Spread: 35 Feet
    Zone: 4

    ‘Sassy Summer Sangria’ Yarrow has dark red flat flower clumps on sturdy stems with ferny green foliage. The bloom period is extended through the summer months, especially if deadheaded after the initial flowering. Achillea ‘Sassy Summer Sangria’ has the darkest flower color of Walters Gardens’ ‘Sassy Summer’ series, all of which tolerate poor soils and dry conditions; rich soil tends to make plants tall and floppy.  Pollinators love Achilleas while deer and rabbits do not.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 40 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Sassy Summer Silver’ Yarrow is an introduction by Walters Gardens in their ‘Sassy Summer’ series. The soft yellow flower clumps top tall sturdy stems, so Achillea ‘Sassy Summer Silver’ makes a good cut or dried flower. Like its ‘siblings’, ‘Sassy Summer Silver’ tolerates dry, poor soils and is not attractive to deer or rabbits. Deadheading prolongs the bloom period.

    Height: 28 Inches
    Spread: 32 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Sassy Summer Sunset’ Yarrow has deep orange flat flower chumps on tall sturdy stems. The bloom period extends from mid to late summer, especially if spent flowers are removed. Like the other ‘Sassy Summer Sunset’ series, Achillea millefolium 'Sassy Summer Sunset' is tough and resilient, tolerating dry and poor soils. The unusual color combines well with blues and purples.

    Height: 34 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Sassy Summer Taffy’ Yarrow is another showy member of Walters Gardens’ new Achillea series. The flat flower clusters are a deep pink when newly opened, and they mature to a softer pink which makes a bicolored look. The tall sturdy stems make Achillea ‘Sassy Summer Taffy’ a good cut flower as well as a tough long-lived perennial. Deadhead to prolong bloom period.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Peter Cottontail’ Yarrow has an unusual flowering habit because the white flowers are not in an umbel, but scattered thickly all over the green clump. Achillea ptarmica ‘Peter Cottontail’ looks like a tight ‘Baby’s Breath’ clump, with the advantage of being deer resistant and tolerant of poor dry soils. This Yarrow reblooms well if deadheaded.

    Height: 20 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The bright yellow flat flowers of 'Moonshine' Yarrow appear in mid to late summer above ferny silvery gray foliage. Salt and dry site tolerant, Achillea x 'Moonshine' is a Blooms of Bressingham® selection.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The cobalt blue flowers of Azure Monkshood appear in late summer and early fall. Aconitum carmichaelii 'Arendsii' blooms for a long period, and Dr. Alan Armitage says "it's the best late flowering Monkshood in cultivation."  It gets the common name Monkshood because the upper sepal of each flower develops into a large, helmet-like structure that somewhat resembles the hood worn by medieval monks.  'Arendsii' stems are unusually thick and are less likely to need support than other Monkshood.  All parts of the plant are poisonous. Breed by German nurseryman Georg Arends at his nursery near Cologne.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Upright spikes of uniquely shaped azure blooms of Aconitum fischeri appear mid-August to late October, taking on a tall vertical form in the garden and pairing nicely with other fall blooming perennials that prefer moist conditions. The flowers, which resemble the hoods of medieval monks, are wonderful for attracting many beneficial insects and are a primary food source for Old World bee species. Known for deterring deer, rabbits, slugs, and undesired insects due to its high toxicity. Spent flower spikes can be deadheaded to promote a second bloom, and deeply lobed foliage remains attractive in the fall.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Dwarf Golden Sweet Flag is a wonderful plant for walkways as well as rain gardens and stream edges, because it is tolerant of foot traffic as well as significant moisture. The evergreen foliage is like tiny thick bladed grass tufts and when crushed, it releases an attractive sweet scent. The tufts slowly expand to make a short yellowish green mat. Try massing 'Minimus Aureus' as a groundcover near water gardens to help control erosion.  Although it looks like a grass, Acorus gramineus 'Minimus Aureus' is actually more closely related to the Iris family.

    Height: 4 Inches
    Spread: 8 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Ogon' Sweet Flag has bright yellow stiffly upright leaves that are a vivid addition to a wet site in the shade.  The leaves release a fresh citrus scent when pinched or bruised.  Clumps of Acorus 'Ogon' will get larger with age as they spread slowly by rhizomes.  This Sweet Flag is evergreen so it provides great winter interest.  Brighter light lends more golden color, while deeper shade highlights green.   Introduced into the US by Barry Yinger. 

    PRN Preferred: Both salt and wet site tolerant, ‘Ogon’ adds a yearlong splash of chartreuse to the shade garden.

    Height: 15 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    White Baneberry is also called 'Doll's Eyes' because the small white berries end in a black dot making this native (and toxic) fruit resemble the staring eyes of old fashioned dolls.  The delicate white flower spikes appear above Astilbe-like foliage in spring, followed by the striking white fruit in summer.  The flowers provide pollen but lack nectar.  The pollen is collected by short-tongued bees.  The berries are eaten by a variety of birds, thereby spreading the seed to other areas.  The birds are immune to the toxic effects of the berries.  All parts of this plant are poisonous.  Actaea pachypoda naturalizes easily in moist but well-drained woodlands.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Snakeroot or Cohosh is a spectacular addition to the late summer flower garden with tall, rocket-like spires of ivory white, fragrant flowers which are held high above the green foliage. The bloom period is longer than a month and insects love it (great for nature photographers). Adds architectural height to the shaded part of the garden.  Host plant for Spring Azure. Actaea racemosa is best in moist, shady locations.

    Height: 72 Inches
    Spread: 48 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Branched Bugbane has fragrant white flowers in late summer, over purplish bronze foliage. Try it combined with chartreuse foliaged plants to really make a impact.  By mid summer the leaves take on a green hue. Bees and butterflies love the blooms. Per noted plantsman David Culp, Actaea do very well under Black Walnuts.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4
    'Hillside Black Beauty' Kamchatka Bugbane has white fragrant flowers in late summer that tower over dark purple foliage. A great source of nectar and pollen for insects. The leaf color is particularly intense in early summer before bloom time.
    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Chocoholic’ Bugbane is shorter than other dark purple Actaeas, but what it lacks in stature it makes up for in the beauty of its foliage. The leaves emerge in the spring as a dark bronzy purple and turn more green by mid summer. The fragrant mauve pink flowers age to white on tall flower spikes that tower over the foliage in the late summer, attracting all manner of pollinators. This is particularly attractive when paired with shade tolerant gold foliage plants. Consistent moisture is necessary for the best performance.  It was discovered by Marco van Noort in the Netherlands as a seedling of 'Brunette'.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Five Finger Maidenhair Fern is a lovely woodland native, thriving in moist humus rich soils.  Preferring cool summer temperatures, Adiantum pedatum is hardy all the way to zone 2.  The bright green airy fronds are made more attractive by the shiny wiry black stems.  Since Adiantum pedatum spreads by rhizomes on the surface of moist soils, it can eventually form an excellent woodland groundcover.  This fern will not perform well in full sun or hot summer sites.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 2

    Creamy white flowers on Aesculus parviflora appear in summer on long panicles. Bottlebrush Buckeye offers golden yellow fall color. A dense, mounded, suckering, deciduous, multi-stemmed shrub which produces pear-shaped nuts (buckeyes) after flowering.  Aesculus parviflora is a wonderful addition to the landscape to attract hummingbirds. Our neighbor nurseryman Dick Karkalits says it is an absolutely foolproof plant for just about any location, and we agree.

    PRN Preferred: This shrub has everything - tolerant of sun, shade, dry or wet soil, showy flowers and native!

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 10 Feet
    Zone: 4

    We grow our own selection of Red Buckeye, selected by us from a field of mature trees at Princeton Nurseries.  The characteristics that guided our choices were clean, disease-free foliage, very dark showy 5" upright panicles in May, and a strong tree-form habit.  We propagate our selection 'Splendens' from the seed of the five trees we moved to Pleasant Run Nursery.  The resulting plants have the outstanding qualities of their parents, and we grow them as tree-form.  Aesculus pavia 'Splendens' makes a tough beautiful small tree. Besides the flower display and the attractive dark green summer foliage, the fall color is a clean yellow and the brown chestnuts feed the wildlife.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Anise Hyssop, hailing from the Great Plains, is a wonderful native Agastache for use in more natural settings. Ranging from 2-4’ tall with flowers leaning on lavender in color this wonderful upright perennial will seed around in optimal conditions. Like all other Agastache this perennial is an absolute pollinator magnet.  The foliage is fragrant and has an anise or licorice scent.  Flowers start in late July and continues until late autumn. 

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Golden Jubilee’ Purple Giant Hyssop combines large showy lavender blue flower spikes with stunning yellow foliage. Both the flowers and the leaves are fragrant and attractive all summer, especially if deadheaded periodically. Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’ performs best in well-drained sites, and will self-seed nicely in sunny sites. ‘Golden Jubilee’ is a great addition to perennial gardens and meadows.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Black Adder' Anise Hyssop has prolific deep blue bottlebrush flowers from mid summer to fall. 'Black Adder' is a cross between A. rugosa and A. foeniculum.  Compact habit and excellent hardiness make this a very exciting Agastache. Dry site tolerant with deliciously fragrant foliage. Good drainage is essential for these plants as they will not survive a winter in wet clay soils. They are drought tolerant once established. From Coen Jansen.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 6

    'Blue Boa' Anise Hyssop is an improvement on 'Blue Fortune'.  The large fragrant flower spikes are larger and deeper blue in color, verging on violet.  The foliage is a bright green and wonderfully fragrant when touched.  Agastache x 'Blue Boa' blooms for a prolonged time in mid to late summer, especially when deadheaded after the initial flowers flush.  Although 'Blue Boa' Hyssop has proven itself to be very cold tolerant, it needs excellent drainage to survive our winters.  Introduced by Terra Nova, and winner of a number of Horticultural Awards.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Blue Fortune' Anise Hyssop has blue flowers mid summer to fall, and fragrant foliage. From the Trompenberg Arboretum in Holland. Agastache bloom time is prolonged by dead heading. Loved by butterflies and other insects.  Leaves may be used in potpourris.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Agastache x ‘Pink Pearl’ is an easy growing, drought-tolerant perennial that produces beautiful, dense spikes of fragrant, light pink blooms from early June to late September. The profuse blooms and mounding habit make this cultivar great for planting in the front of a perennial border or in containers, where it will attract hummingbirds and other pollinators throughout its long blooming period.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 6

    The smoky bluish violet racemes of 'Purple Haze' Anise Hyssop start in July and keep going until fall. Agastache x 'Purple Haze' is a real butterfly and bee magnet, from those plant gurus of North Creek Nurseries. Hybridized by Coen Jansen of the Netherlands.   Great for mass planting to create an impressive bluish purple haze in the garden, hence the name.

    PRN Preferred: This fragrant native blooms for a very long period and has an excellent upright flower form.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 6

    The deep purple, nearly black shiny leaves of 'Black Scallop' ('Binblasca') Bugleweed have ruffled edges. Deep blue flower spikes appear on Ajuga in late spring. Great for a shade planting where grass is difficult to establish.  Plant with other shade lovers and spring bulbs for an impressive show.  From Mike Tristram of the UK.

    Height: 3 Inches
    Spread: 6 Inches
    Zone: 6

    The foliage of Ajuga reptans 'Burgundy Glow' is composed of stunning shades of pink, white and purple, with blue flower spikes adding to the show in late spring.  Good for small spaces, containers and rock gardens.

    Height: 3 Inches
    Spread: 6 Inches
    Zone: 6

    'Catlin's Giant' Bugleweed has bronze leaves that are much larger than other Ajugas, sporting spikes of blue flower up to 8" tall in April and May. A rapid-spreading evergreen groundcover.  

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Chocolate Chip' ('Valfredda') Bugleweed has tiny purplish chocolate foliage with violet blue flower spikes in late spring. This Ajuga makes an excellent dwarf groundcover forming a tight mat of foliage around stepping stones. It came to the US from Italy.

    Height: 2 Inches
    Spread: 4 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Cordial Canary’ is in the Feathered Friends™ Series of showy new Ajugas from hybridizer Chris Hansen. Ajuga ‘Cordial Canary’ has lime-green to yellow ground-hugging foliage which is topped in spring by violet blue flower spikes. Like other Ajugas, ‘Cordial Canary’ thrives in light shade. The chartreuse to yellow foliage is semi-evergreen, so the seasons of interest are long. The running habit makes Ajuga ‘Cordial Canary’ a good addition to mixed containers.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Fierce Falcon’ Bugleweed, from Chris Hansen’s Feathered Friends™ Series, produces foliage that is lustrous and such a dark purple that it is almost black. The ground-hugging running habit makes this a great shade groundcover, and Ajuga ‘Fierce Falcon’ is even showier in spring, when the shiny foliage is topped by short cobalt blue flower spikes. Ajuga foliage is semi-evergreen to evergreen, depending on winter conditions, so the running habit of ‘Fierce Falcon’ makes a good addition to mixed pots.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Parrot Paradise’ Bugleweed is part of the Feathered Friends™ series hybridized by Chris Hansen. The foliage is a bright combination of chartreuse, bronze and red, topped by cobalt blue flower spikes in spring. Like other Bugleweed cultivars, Ajuga reptans ‘Parrot Paradise’ is an evergreen groundcover for shady locations. The habit is spreading, so it works well in shade as an erosion controller.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Pink Lightning’ Bugleweed is a departure from most Ajugas in having short mauve pink flower spikes instead of blue in mid spring. The crinkled leaves of Ajuga ‘Pink Lightning’ are an attractive soft green with creamy white edges, and they are colorful almost all year. ‘Pink Lightning’ was a sport found and introduced by Sunny Borders Nursery of Connecticut. A spring nectar source for hummingbirds and pollinators.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 6 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Finally, a beautiful, bright gold Bugleweed to rule them all! A selection from the Feathered Friends™ series, Ajuga ‘Tropical Toucan’ features not only large, electric yellow foliage on reddish stems, but bright cobalt blue flowers from April to June that contrast beautifully in the landscape. ‘Tropical Toucan’ Bugleweed is a fast growing and low maintenance evergreen groundcover, helping to suppress weeds with its spreading, low-growing habit. Besides being deer and rabbit resistant, Ajuga ‘Tropical Toucan’ is also shown to be relatively heat tolerant and is capable of handling full shade.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Thriller' Lady's Mantle blooms in May and June, producing airy delicate chartreuse yellow flowers held above fuzzy bluish green leaves.  'Thriller' has somewhat larger pleated leaves and a more prolific bloom than the species, and like all Alchemilla mollis, the hairy leaves repel rain water so that the foliage has attractive silver water drops on if after a gentle rain.  'Thriller' performs best in shady, moist conditions.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Medusa’ Ornamental Onion gets its name because the green strap-like leaves curl and twist on the ends like Medusa’s hair. The light purple drumstick flowers emerge just above the foliage in late summer and early fall. When the bloom period is finished, you can still enjoy the dry seedheads. Similar in flower color and foliage color to ‘Blue Eddy’, but in a much larger form.  Rich in nectar, the butterflies and bees love it but the rabbits and deer absolutely leave Ornamental Onions alone (so far…).

    PRN Preferred: The twisty curly foliage is attractive all summer.

    Height: 22 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Millenium' Ornamental Onion blooms in July and August, producing lots of 2" purplish lavender round clusters of flowers like drumsticks on 15" stems. The onion scented leaves are glossy and strap-like, making a thick clump from which the long lasting blooms arise.  Very floriferous and strong upright stems make this an exceptional plant and a great addition to rock gardens, perennial borders and containers.   Many insects and butterflies feed off them but deer and rabbits will not touch them. All Ornamental Onions do well under Black Walnuts. Allium 'Millenium' is the product of Mark McDonough's hard work with Ornamental Onions. 2018 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    PRN Preferred:  A long blooming selection with clean foliage, simply stunning in bloom.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Allium x cernuum, or nodding Pink Onion, is a tough deer resistant bulb plant which is crowned by multiple pink flower umbels. The blooms appear above the green strap-like leaves in July and August. These are followed by attractive tan seedheads. The clumps increase in size as time goes on and the bulbs can be divided and spread to make a lovely addition to short meadows in mid summer or try it in tough-to-grow areas, such as hell-strips.  Great on green roofs.  Self-seeds vigorously in the garden.  

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Forescate’ Chives have dark pink to lavender round flower heads held on straight stems above the edible tubular foliage. Alliums bloom heavily in summer and are perfect for sunny locations that have deer problems. Allium ‘Forescate’ is an excellent addition to rock or scree gardens (think ‘Beth Chatto’), and deadheading after the bloom period is a good idea because the schoenoprasum cultivars seed easily.  A slightly taller, darker, more brilliant pink than the species.  Is a effective accent in green roof meadows.  ‘Forescate’ is very attractive to many pollinators. One of Roy Diblik’s favorite Alliums.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 2

    'Snowcap' Chives produces delicate white flowers above tubular foliage in early to mid summer.  The bloom period is prolonged if Allium 'Snowcap' is deadheaded, which also keeps it from seeding itself in flowerbeds.  The leaves are edible (this is a cultivar of edible chives), but are not touched by deer or rabbits.  Alliums are bulbs, so 'Snowcap' is easily divided when dormant.  A Mark McDonough introduction.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Blue Eddy’ Spiral Onion gets its name from its foliage, which is a neat bluish gray rosette of swirly flat blades. Allium senescens ‘Blue Eddy’ produces pinkish lavender ‘drumstick’ flowers above the rosettes in late summer through early fall. When the flowers are spent, they leave behind interesting dry seedheads that are a good addition to dried flower arrangements. Allium ‘Blue Eddy’ is excellent in rock gardens, containers and dry sites. Bred by Mark McDonough.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'In Orbit' Ornamental Onion blooms from June to September, producing large 3" globular flowers of lavender purple.  The "Drumstick" blooms are 16" tall over green, deer repellent foliage.  'In Orbit' Allium is a very attractive cut flower, and the spent flower heads make a lovely addition to dried flower arrangements.  Pollinators flock to all Alliums when they are in bloom.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Lavender Bubbles’ Ornamental Onion has deep purple drumstick flowers in late summer and blooming in masses above the blue green twisty foliage.  The seedheads remain throughout fall. Both the blooms and the leaves are scented and as a result not touched by deer or rabbits. Hummingbirds and pollinators, however, love Allium ‘Lavender Bubbles,’ which provides a good source of food at an important time of year. ‘Lavender Bubbles’ is a good container plant for sunny locations, and a great addition to rock gardens.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Pink Planet’ Ornamental Onion was introduced by Intrinsic Perennial Gardens for its numerous large lilac pink drumstick flowers. Allium ‘Pink Planet’ has blue green flat leaves which are topped by 18” blooms in mid summer. The seedheads turn tan when the bloom season is over, and make interesting dried elements in the fall and winter landscapes. Allium ‘Pink Planet’ was hybridized by Brent Horvath. A good choice for well-drained rock gardens and pollinator gardens.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Windy City’ Ornamental Onion is a showy introduction by Brent Horvath and Intrinsic Perennial Gardens. The globular dark purple flowers are held above the green flat leaves on 18” sturdy green stems in mid summer. The seedheads turn tan in the fall and persist well into winter. They make an attractive addition to dried arrangements. Allium x ‘Windy City’ is a good addition to green roofs, sunny balconies and well drained sunny perennial gardens.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Summer Beauty’ Ornamental Onion produces a quantity of flat refined strap-like leaves in spring, topped by soft pink round umbels on long stalks starting in June. Allium x lusitanicum 'Summer Beauty' continues blooming almost all summer, and the dried round seedheads add interest to the winter landscape as well. Try them spray painted cool colors (as our good friend Simple does), or added to dried arrangements. Roy Diblik of Northwind Perennial Farm loves using ‘Summer Beauty’, and told us he had first seen it thriving in someone’s driveway.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Considered to be one of the major “Keystone Species”, Amelanchier canadensis is as ornamentally interesting as it is ecologically valuable. Small, white, fragrant flowers appear in April and May, which are visited by bees and other early emerging pollinators. In June and July, purple drupes emerge that are enjoyed by birds and small mammals, and are also culinarily valuable to humans. The fruits can be processed into jams and jellies for baking. In autumn, foliage turns varied shades of red and orange that add a lovely splash of color to the landscape. Canada Serviceberry is highly adaptable to a wide range of soil types, typically preferring medium, well-drained soils but able to tolerate clay and soils with higher moisture content. This is a host plant for the larval stage of the Viceroy butterfly as well as the Red-spotted Purple butterfly. Despite its fruits being loved by wildlife, Amelanchier canadensis tends to be mostly deer resistant.

    Height: 25 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 4

    If a low-maintenance, multi-seasonal shrub with an upright form is what you’re after, look no further than RAINBOW PILLAR® Serviceberry! Amelanchier canadensis ‘Glennform’, sold as RAINBOW PILLAR®, is a large deciduous shrub or small tree that performs well in a wide range of soil conditions. RAINBOW PILLAR® Serviceberry is taller than the species, typically reaching heights of around 20’ with a width of only around 6’. Small, lightly fragrant, five-petalled white flowers appear from April to May, attracting early spring pollinators and making quite a show in the landscape. Following its bloom time, RAINBOW PILLAR® Serviceberry will produce blackish purple fruits starting in June, which are attractive to birds, and can be eaten raw or processed into jams and jellies for human consumption. It receives its rainbow namesake due to the array of fall colors that take over the foliage, ranging from red, orange, yellow and purple all at once.

    Height: 18 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Amelanchier laevis has white flowers in early April. The reddish purple fruit of Allegheny Serviceberry is loved by birds. Good reddish orange fall color of Amelanchier laevis makes it a wonderful landscape choice to provide interest for each season. A wet site tolerant plant, A. laevis has an added attribute of retaining its leaves throughout the summer unlike A. canadensis, and it also has heavier and fewer stems forming the clump.

    Height: 25 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Small white flowers of Amelanchier x grandiflora Autumn Brilliance® emerge from pink buds in April. Apple Serviceberry has berries in June that will turn magenta to purple and are prized by many birds, including Mocking birds. Autumn Brilliance® has brilliant orange-red fall color (hence the cultivar name).  A wet site tolerant plant introduced by nurseryman Bill Wandell of Illinois.  This Amelanchier has an added attribute of retaining its leaves throughout the summer unlike A. canadensis.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 4

    ‘Robin Hill’ Apple Serviceberry blooms in early spring, producing pink flower buds that open to soft pinkish white. The flower clusters mature to bluish purple fruit in early to mid summer, which is rapidly consumed by birds. The berries were an appreciated source of fruit for early settlers. The green summer leaves take on orange and red shades in fall. Amelanchier x grandiflora ‘Robin Hill’ is compact and resilient, both as a multi-stem and a single-stem tree. It is a cross between Amelanchier canadensis and Amelanchier laevis and supposed to be more resistance to mildew.  We just started growing this cultivar in 2022 and have been very impressed with it.  This is a good choice for urban and tight locations.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 4

    The delicate light blue flowers of Arkansas Amsonia appear in May. It also has stunning orange and yellow fall foliage. A true tough multi-season plant plus Amsonia hubrichtii produces a latex-like sap that deer tend to avoid. This low maintenance native perennial is a slow grower; it may take 1 to 2 years before it's true beauty is revealed.  A showstopper when planted in mass.  Full sun and moist, well-drained soils create the best fall color; however, it will grow in a range of light and soil moisture conditions.  Native to the Ouachita Mountains in central Arkansas, where it was discovered in the early 1940's by Leslie Hubricht. 2011 Perennial Plant of the Year, and Dr. JC Raulston's favorite perennial.

    PRN PreferredExcellent fall foliage display, makes an impact when planted in mass.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Storm Cloud' Blue Star is the prettiest Amsonia we have seen, with large terminal clusters of bright sky blue star shaped flowers set off by almost black stems, the stems are particularly showy as they emerge in the spring, looking like thin black Asparagus.  The narrow leaves open to an attractive dark green.  Amsonia 'Storm Cloud' was found in moist shade in Alabama by those extraordinary plantsmen, Tony Avent and Hans Hansen, and they picked a particularly apt name for this beautiful native.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4
    The medium blue blooms of 'Blue Ice' Blue Star Flower appear in May and June, with the darkest flower color of the Amsonias we grow. Fall foliage color is yellow. Found at White Flower Farm by famed plantsman Michael Dodge. This is one of Stephanie Cohen's favorite plants, and it makes a great groundcover.
    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Blackhawks' Big Bluestem is a beautiful Andropogon selection from Brent Horvath of Intrinsic Perennial Gardens.  The 4' stems emerge with green blades in spring, but the foliage takes on shades of deep purple in mid summer.  The turkey foot inflorescences appear in August and turn into airy, light catching seedheads for added fall and winter beauty.  Andropogon gerardii 'Blackhawks' got its name from its origins in Illinois (Chicago Blackhawks), and it thrives in prairie like conditions.

    Height: 60 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Red October' Big Bluestem is an exciting color breakthrough for this tough native grass.  The leaves are tipped with burgundy and held on tall upright green stems in summer.  The fall the foliage turns a bright scarlet red for several weeks after the first frost.  'Red October' also has red turkey-foot-shaped seed, particularly showy when backlit.  The sturdy upright stems are an attractive tan in winter.  An important food source for winter birds.  Introduced by Intrinsic Perennials.

    Height: 60 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Black Mountain’ Bluestem is a tough native grass which was found on Black Mountain, North Carolina by Terry Dalton of the North Carolina Arboretum. He chose it from his family’s wild meadow because of its compact stature and attractive blue green foliage. Andropogon ‘Black Mountain’ is showy in the fall when the stems take on reddish hues and the silvery inflorescences catch the light. ‘Black Mountain’ is happiest if left alone, so do not fertilize or irrigate once it is established.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Broom-sedge or Beardgrass is a tough native grass that adds great beauty to sterile, dry meadows and open fields. The green upright stems take on shades of reddish burgundy in September, as they are coming into flower. The seedheads of Andropogon virginicus are an airy silver displayed all along the grass stems, and are particularly stunning when backlit by afternoon light. The fall and winter color of the strong upright stems is a bright orange tan.  Its seed provides winter food for song birds and it is a host plant for the Zabulon Skipper butterfly.  Andropogon virginicus is tolerant of high salt, drought, and wet or dry soils, making it an excellent plant for roadside habitats.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Native to much of the East Coast and found as far west as the Rocky Mountains and as far south as New Mexico, Anemone canadensis is a fast-growing herbaceous perennial that is known for its rapid, low-growing abilities that make it a suitable groundcover for the naturalized garden. Capable of spreading by rhizome as well as by seed, windflower can become a dense matrix of attractive basal foliage topped by a profuse bloom of white, apetalous flowers with yellow stamens from early May to mid-June. This particular species prefers moist soil conditions, and is tolerant of streambanks, river beds, low meadows, and other wet sites, where it may occasionally become aggressive. Like its cousin, Anemone virginiana, Anemone canadensis deters deer and rabbits. It is the larval host plant for the veiled ear moth, as well as the one-lined Sparganothis moth.

    Height: 14 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Snowdrop Anemone or Windflower blooms in April, with single 5-sepaled white flowers on delicate stems above the dissected green foliage.  The single flowers have showy yellow anthers in the cupped center and are lightly fragrant.  Anemone sylvestris spreads by rhizomes to make an attractive underplanting groundcover, and is an excellent naturalizer in woodland settings.  The lovely flower display is followed by interesting wooly seedheads.  Repeat bloom may occur in the cooler weather of early autumn. 

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Anemone virginiana is a native perennial wildflower known for its chaotic upright flowers of white with yellow stamens that stand 3-4’ tall in the landscape during their late April to June bloom period. This fast-growing, low maintenance Thimbleweed gets its common name from the persistent seedheads, which resemble… you guessed it, thimbles. When left to spread naturally, colonies of Thimbleweed act as a nice protective cover for small mammals and birds. Anemone virginiana does not spread quite as aggressively as its cousin Anemone canadensis, but can establish itself as a wonderful groundcover when allowed to naturalize. Deer and other grazing animals tend to leave this plant alone.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 14 Inches
    Zone: 2

    Cultivated in Britain and part of the popular and profusely blooming Swan Series, Anemone x ‘Dainty Swan’ produces large, two-toned blossoms of white tinged with purple-pink on the reverse side and golden yellow centers, which appear in June and continue into October. Perfect for refreshing the cottage or wildlife garden late in the season. Prized for maintaining its clumping habit, this windflower variety is a great addition to the mixed border or when planted in mass. Flowers can be used for fresh cut arrangements, and should be deadheaded as they fade to promote more blooms.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Anemone x 'Honorine Jobert' is a Japanese Anemone with tall single white flowers, blooming for numerous weeks from late summer into fall. It prefers moist, humus-rich sites, and will make a large clump in time. A vigorous, low-maintenance plant, with dense, compact mounds of basal foliage which grows about 12-18 inches tall, but when in bloom the plants are 3-4 feet tall.  It spreads by shallow creeping rhizomes.  The flowers are visited by numerous bees and butterflies and make a good cut flower. After flowering concludes, rounded seedheads remain at the end of the stems for additional interest.  ‘Honorine Jobert’, was discovered in Verdun, France in 1858.  2016 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Jasmine’ (‘IFANJ’) Windflower is one of the Fantasy™ series of compact, floriferous Anemones. The dark pink single flowers start in August and bloom for an extended period into fall. Anemone Fantasy™ ‘Jasmine’ was bred in the Netherlands, by Innaflora BV, the hybridizers of other Pretty Lady™ Anemones. Introduced in the USA by Plants Nouveau.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 6

    The semi-double pinkish lavender flowers of 'Pamina' Japanese Anemone appear on compact plants. Flowers bloom late summer into fall often extending to first frost.  Planted in mass they make a very display late in the season.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'September Charm' Japanese Anemone has a silvery cast to its tall pinkish rose single flowers. One of the hardiest of the Anemones, it expands gradually to make an impressive group. Fall blooming.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Wild Swan™ ('Macane001') Hybrid Windflower was found in Scotland as a chance seedling at Elizabeth MacGregor's nursery.  She chose it for its outstanding hybrid vigor and its beautiful single white flowers.  The backs of the petals have a light violet strip up the midrib, visible as the flowers move in the breeze.  Anemone x Wild Swan™ will spread to form a large clump and blooms from late summer through fall.  It was named a winner of the 2011 Chelsea Flower show.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Cinderella' Windflower is another compact beauty from the Pretty Lady™ series of Anemones.  The flowers appear in August and September, with thick textured single soft pink petals.  Anemone 'Cinderella'  has thick short flower stems so the blooms do not flop.  Blooming for an extended time in mid summer to early fall, this introduction from Plants Nouveau also produces interesting fluffy white seedheads after flowering.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Pocahontas' Windflower is a lovely compact introduction from the Pretty Lady™ Series of Anemones.  The large double flowers are a bright bubblegum pink, making quite a show in July, August and September.  The blooms are followed by cottony white seedheads in the fall.  Anemone 'Pocahontas' is a heavy bloomer, so it is showy in the front of a mixed boarder and in late summer containers.  The strong stems make 'Pocahontas' a useful cut flower, as well as resistant to flopping.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Red Riding Hood' Windflower is an addition to the Fantasy™ series of Anemones, developed by Yoshihiro Kanazawa of Japan.  The rose red single flowers cover the compact plants starting in late July and continuing into October with the prolonged bloom period and the strong compact habit, Anemone x Fantasy™ 'Red Riding Hood' makes and excellent late summer to fall container plant.

    PRN Preferred: This Japanese hybrid is both an extremely heavy bloomer and a tight compact plant.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Antennaria plantaginifolia is a full sun loving, semi-evergreen native that is perfect for sites with well-draining, rocky soils. Woolly gray stems held above basal rosettes of paddle-shaped foliage produce the namesake fluffy, white flowerheads from April to June, which are a primary source of nectar for the American lady butterfly and are also visited by solitary bees. The life cycles of two different fly species are reliant on the leaves of this plant as a nesting site. Tolerant of poor soils and drought, pussytoes will create an excellent groundcover where many other low-growing perennials may have difficulty.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Perfect for the part-shade cottage or rock garden, this heat-tolerant, low-growing perennial snapdragon boasts sprays of pastel pink blooms from June to mid-September. Antirrhinum hispanicum ‘Roseum’ is a wonderful companion to other, more brightly colored summer-blooming plants, with its fuzzy silver-green foliage and soft, rose pink flowerheads making a show in the garden all season long.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Our native Columbine, Aquilegia canadensis blooms in April and May, producing beautiful downward facing flowers of red and yellow. They hover above the attractive biternate green foliage, and serve as an important source of nectar for hummingbirds on their northern migrations, as well as native pollinators. Aquilegia canadensis seeds itself well in meadows and edges of the woods, and adds a lovely graceful note to spring flower displays.  Columbine prefers partial shade conditions but will tolerate more sun with adequate moisture.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Columbine is an all-time gardener’s favorite for its compact, low-maintenance attitude and unique, bell-shaped flowers. Aquilegia canadensis ‘Corbett’ has all of the red-flowering variety’s best attributes, with the added benefit of light, popcorn-yellow flowers resembling tiny illuminated lanterns overtop of soft, velvety-green foliage, and a mature height of 14-18”. Various bee species as well as Ruby-throated hummingbirds visit the flowers for nectar during its late April to early June bloom period. During summer and into the autumn months, ‘Corbett’ Columbine may sporadically produce flowers at the same time that its attractive seedheads are also visible. This yellow-flowering variety was discovered by Lawrence Clemens and named in honor of the Corbett Historic District in Maryland.

    Height: 14 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Aquilegia canadensis 'Little Lanterns' is a dwarf selection of our native Columbine that has a lot of flower power. 'Little Lanterns' Columbine has downward facing flowers of red and yellow in April and May, a favorite for hummingbirds.  Use this lovely cultivar in open shade gardens, woodland gardens or naturalized areas.  Continue to water plants after bloom for a wonderful groundcover of attractive foliage.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Earlybird™ ‘Purple Yellow’ Columbine has large bicolored flowers with soft yellow center petals and purple spurs. The blooms appear in mid to late spring over attractive delicate foliage. The habit is compact and the big flowers face out and upward instead of hanging down. Aquilegia x Earlybird™ ‘Purple Yellow’ performs best in some shade and cooler temperatures.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Earlybird™ ‘Red Yellow’ Columbine blooms in mid to late spring, producing yellow open petals surrounded by red spurred petals. The flowers face upward and are much larger than the native Columbines. The delicate green foliage of Aquilegia x Earlybird™ ‘Red Yellow’ forms a compact clump and performs best in some shade.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Sun King' Golden Aralia is a very large showy perennial, producing chartreuse yellow compound leaves which hold their striking color all summer. Foliage retains good yellow color throughout summer unless grown in too much shade. The 2' tall white flower spikes appear in late summer, and are followed by purplish black berries. Barry Yinger found this Aralia in Japan (in a department store's garden section!) and brought it to the US. This is a great plant to light up the back of shady perennial beds.

    Height: 60 Inches
    Spread: 48 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Massachusetts' Bearberry has small shiny evergreen leaves with small pinkish white bell-like flowers in April and May, often followed by red fruits. The berries provide winter forage for many mammals, including bears.  Arctostaphylos  is a prostrate, flat-growing plant best grown in acid soil and sandy, well drained sites.  Grows well in poor infertile soils.  There are large colonies of Bearberry in the NJ Pinelands.  'Massachusetts' produces abundant flowers and fruits; it has smaller leaves than the species.  The leaves feed several species of caterpillar,  such as the Hoary Elfin.  Selected by Bob Tichnor of Oregon from seed collected in Massachusetts.  It is also salt tolerant.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 3

    Aronia arbutifolia 'Brilliantissima' is a deciduous shrub with white flowers in May. The bright red fruit of this Red Chokeberry ripens in late summer and persists into winter. The glossy foliage turns brilliant red in fall. This cultivar differs from the species; it is more compact, produces larger and more numerous fruit plus has superior red fall color.  It forms a suckering colony and is wet site and salt tolerant.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Ground Hug™ Black Chokeberry ('UCONNAM012') was developed in Connecticut by Dr Mark Brand, to answer the need for tough native groundcover shrubs.  Aronia melanocarpa Proven Winners® Color Choice® Ground Hug™ stays low while suckering to a wide, densely branched groundcover thicket.  The delicate white spring flowers are followed by glossy black fruit in late summer (an important food source for wildlife).  Then the crowning glory is the vivid orange and red fall foliage.  Because of Ground Hug's™ vigorous spreading habit it would work well as a slope stabilizer. (used to be Ground Hog)

    Height: 1 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 3

    Low Scape Hedger® Black Chokeberry ('UCONNAM166') is a selection of our native Aronia, chosen for its compact upright habit. In mid spring Low Scape Hedger® produces a quantity of showy white racemes held above the lustrous green foliage. During the summer the dense habit makes a good choice for short hedges. In the fall the leaves turn striking shades of orange and red, brightening up the landscape for a prolonged period before dropping. Fruit production is limited, but native pollinators benefit. Developed by Dr. Mark Brand and Dr. Bryan Connolly of U. Conn.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 3

    Low Scape Mound® Black Chokeberry ('UCONNAM165') is an unusual Aronia melanocarpa form produced by Drs. Mark Brand and Bryan Connolly of U. Conn. Low Scape Mound® performs as a groundcover instead of an upright shrub, so it works well as an erosion control plant as well as an edger. The green spring foliage is topped by lots of attractive white racemes. The showy flowers are followed by shiny black fruit in late summer, providing important food for wildlife. The fall color is a deep red, persisting for several weeks.  A good native sub for Deutzia.

    PRN Preferred: The habit of this versatile native is both low and broad, and the foliage is beautiful throughout hot summers and cool falls.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 3

    'Viking' Black Chokeberry has glossy dark green leaves which turn a striking red in fall. The white, spring flowers are followed by large purplish black fruit, which birds love (and they are full of anti-oxidants). The site adaptability (Aronia melanocarpa 'Viking' likes both wet and dry conditions) and the suckering habit make it an excellent shrub for reclamation use, as well as an attractive landscape plant. Dr. Mark Brand of Connecticut found this native beauty.  2020 PHS Gold Medal Plant!

    PRN Preferred:  A good shrub for wetland reclamation plantings, a more compact variety with very large glossy foliage.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Part of the SunFern™ series of Wormwood, Artemisia gmelinii 'Olympia' is strikingly similar to what you would expect out of woodland ferns but for tough, sunny locations. The deeply dissected dark green foliage may well fool the novice into thinking it’s a fern but you and I both know this to be something much weirder and more novel.

    Height: 20 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Silver Mound' Artemisia is one of the most striking examples of silver leaved perennials.  The fine, feathery foliage makes a tight cushiony mound in dry sites, and retains the attractive habit throughout the summer if periodically given a light trim.  Artemisia 'Silver Mound' does bloom periodically, but the flowers are insignificant and should be removed to maintain the silver cushion look.  The low compact size of 'Silver Mound' makes it a good candidate for rock gardens and summer containers.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The silvery gray foliage of GardenGhost™ wormwood is outstanding in the landscape, adding texture and contrast while maintaining its compact, mounding habit. This variety of Artemisia is highly disease and heat resistant, having been bred as an improved version of the ‘Silver King’ variety.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Powis Castle' Wormwood has showy silver foliage with a finely textured appearance, and needs a dry site. The foliage is sharply aromatic.  The hybrid was selected by British gardener A. J. Hancock in the late 1960's, and used to line walls and terraces surrounding the castle.  Sold to promote the National Trust gardens, it was introduced in 1972 by the National Trusts’ Powis Castle in Wales. 

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Miniature Goat's Beard has delicate Astilbe-like spikes of creamy white above deeply cut green foliage, blooming in June. Dr. Alan Armitage feels that Aruncus aesthusifolius is more heat tolerant than the bigger Aruncus, and he's right, from our experience here in New Jersey.  Adequate moisture is necessary, pairs well with ferns and hostas in the shade garden, it can also be used in rock gardens due to it diminutive size.  Miniature Goat's Beard often produces attractive fall foliage in shades of bronze and purple.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Goat's Beard has large white Astilbe-like flowers in June, held well above the plant. It prefers moist, shady locations and it is particularly gorgeous planted in masses.   The flowers attract numerous butterflies, pollinators and bees.  Aruncus dioicus is dioecious (separate male and female plants). Both flower but the male plants are more floriferous having numerous stamens per flower while the female flower has only 3 stamens.  The genus name Aruncus comes from the Greek word for goat’s beard.  Best if pruned back after flowering to promote bushy growth.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Chantilly Lace' hybrid Goatsbeard blooms in late spring and early summer, producing masses of airy creamy white sprays above the attractive green foliage.  Aruncus 'Chantilly Lace' is an excellent addition to shade gardens, with strong vigor and increasing clump size over many years.  This showy native is part of the Proven Winners® perennial program, from Walters Gardens.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 40 Inches
    Zone: 3
    'Misty Lace' Goatsbeard is a cross between A. dioicus and A. aesthusifolius, resulting in a nice compact form with lots of creamy white Astilbe-like flowers in May and June. The intermediate size and reddish stems make Aruncus x 'Misty Lace' a lovely addition to the shade perennial garden. A selection by Dr. Alan Armitage of the University of Georgia, so you know it is happy in the heat and humidity. Likes a moist, humus-rich site.
    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The soft green leaves of Canadian Ginger appear in pairs in spring and are followed closely by weird, hairy, burgundy brown 3-lobed flowers which attracts pollinators such as crawling flies and beetles with its fragrance. It requires high organic matter soil that maintains constant moisture until the plant is established.  Asarum canadense spreads rapidly in forest understory sites.  Ants carry seeds back to their nests dispersing and creating new plants. They are the larval host for the pipeline swallowtail.  Asarum canadense is a great native groundcover that does well in deep shade and is perfect for a woodland garden or to help with erosion control. 

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The lustrous green leaves of European Wild Ginger are evergreen and leathery in texture. The flowers are small, inconspicuous 3 lobed burgundy brown hairy oddities which appear in late spring to early summer. Flowers are pollinated by flies and the roots have a mild ginger scent.   It is a creeping groundcover that spreads well in shady moist sites.

    Height: 8 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The large shiny dark green leaves of Chinese Ginger have heavy silver mottling. The interesting burgundy brown flowers are found beneath the leaves. It is semi-evergreen and slow growing. Prefers a dry site.  Hardy to zone 6 but may overwinter in zone 5 if protected. Best planted with the crown level to the soil, avoid planting this plant too deep.

    Height: 8 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Swamp Milkweed is a great addition to wet sites, stream banks and butterfly gardens.  Fragrant white-to-pink milkweed flowers appearing in July and August on tall, clump-forming plants. The flat cymes are followed by interesting seed pods. Asclepias incarnata is an important Monarch butterfly nectar source and is an important food source for the larval stage of Monarch butterflies.  It tolerates dry sites as well as wet conditions.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Cinderella’ Swamp Milkweed is a great native for bogs, ponds and streams. The small bright pink flowers are produced in showy umbels (flat crowns) from July to early fall, providing an important source of nectar and pollen to butterflies and other pollinators. Besides having an attractive vanilla scent, the blooms of Asclepias ‘Cinderella’ make a good long-stemmed cut flower. Like all Milkweeds, ‘Cinderella’ is deer resistant and an important host for Monarch butterfly larvae.

    Height: 40 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Ice Ballet' Swamp Milkweed produces fragrant bright white milkweed flowers in flat clumps (umbels) in July and August.  An important native host for Monarch butterfly larvae, Asclepias 'Ice Ballet' is an excellent addition to rain gardens, bioswales and moist meadows.  The white latex is repellent to deer and rabbits, so the clumps get larger and showier with time.  The blooms are followed by the classic milkweed pods which release silky white seeds when ripe.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Soulmate' Swamp Milkweed blooms in July and August, producing clumps of fragrant mauve pink flowers.  Asclepias incarnata 'Soulmate' thrives in moist and wet sites, so it works well in rain gardens, bioswales and wet meadows.  Milkweeds are critical for Monarch caterpillars, and many pollinators are drawn to the flowers, Asclepias 'Soulmate' naturalizes well in wet locations because of the airborne milkweed seed production in fall.

    Height: 42 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Common Milkweed is an important host for larval Monarch Butterflies. Asclepias syriaca is native to pastures and open areas, where it thrives in average to poor dry soils. This is a big and rangy perennial which provides mid to late nutrition for many native pollinators when the showy pinkish lavender flower clumps abound. When cut, white sap is extruded which is somewhat toxic.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Lovely orange and yellow flowers in June and July, followed by small spindle-shaped seed pods which when ripe will open to release silky seeds to be dispersed in the wind. Butterfly Weed is an important plant for butterflies, the leaves are a food source for monarch butterfly caterpillars and the flowers are a nectar source for many butterflies.   Typically grows in clumps 1 to 3 feet tall, and is found in dry, rocky open woods, prairies, fields, and roadsides.  It must have a dry site and seeds readily given the right conditions.  This species does not have milky-sapped stems.  Asclepias tuberosa pairs well with other native plants such as asters, coneflowers and ornamental grasses.  Once established Butterfly Weed is very drought tolerant but difficult to transplant due to the large taproot.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Whorled Milkweed is a tough native perennial which serves as a critical food source for all stages of Monarch butterfly development. The delicate white umbel shaped fragrant flowers appear from June through autumn, on top of the narrow leaves.  Asclepias verticillata is one of the last milkweeds to go dormant, making it a valuable late season food source for Monarch butterflies and their caterpillars.  The common name ‘Whorled’ refers to the way the leaves circle the stems. Because of Asclepias verticillata’s white sap, Whorled Milkweed is not eaten by deer or rodents. The silky seeds are released in fall from the pods (also useful in dried flower arrangements).  The fall foliage color is yellow.  This species will colonize to form a large patch.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Mango' Pawpaw is a slow growing tropical looking tree which bears delicious yellow fruit in October.  The fruit is large and smooth skinned, with delicious soft flesh surrounding a few brown seeds.  All Pawpaws are significant hosts for butterflies and moths, and are still commonly found in patches in old farmyards because settlers depended on Asimina triloba for the delicious fruit.

    Height: 25 Feet
    Spread: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5
    NC-1 Pawpaw is a really hardy selection from a cross made in Canada. Asimina triloba NC-1 Pawpaw's delicious yellow fruit is ready in September to October.
    Height: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Pennsylvania Golden' Pawpaw is an early ripening form of our largest native fruit. The flesh is yellow and the taste is reminiscent of mango, banana and pineapple. Pawpaw ice cream is one of the greatest desserts we have ever eaten. Asiminas are important hosts for the larvae of the Zebra Swallowtail Butterfly, as well as the Pawpaw Sphinx Moth. Pawpaws are often found colonizing shady riverbanks along the Mid Atlantic and Southern plains.

    Height: 25 Feet
    Spread: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Prolific' Pawpaw has large delicious early ripening fruit in early fall.  The flavor is complex, with hints of banana and mango, resulting in the old common name of 'Poor Man's Banana'.  The 3 lobed hanging flowers in early spring are among the more interesting bloom forms, with 3 fleshy brown petals and a somewhat unpleasant odor (since they need flies and beetles to pollinate them).  The leaves are large and tropical looking.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Sunflower' Pawpaw, a somewhat self-fertile variety of a wonderful but under utilized native fruit tree. Asimina triloba 'Sunflower' Pawpaw's yellow fruit is ready in October.

    Height: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Sweet Alice' Pawpaw was found by Homer Jacobs in West Virginia in 1934, and became a common farmyard fruit tree because of its large sweet orange yellow fruit produced in September and early October. The habit is somewhat more compact than some other selections and the fruit set is plentiful. All Pawpaws fruit best when planted near 1 or more other cultivars, because cross pollination between different clones is important for a good fruit set. The interesting purple brown flowers appear in April and May.

    Height: 15 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Wilson' Pawpaw was found in the wild in Kentucky.  The fruit is medium to large sized and has golden yellow flesh when ripe in the fall.  The interesting purple brown flowers are produced in early spring and are set all along the branches.  Since all Pawpaws except 'Sunflower' are "self-incompatible", it is best to plant 2 or more cultivars for good fruit set.  The harvest period is fairly long for Pawpaws, as the fruit ripens over a month.

    Height: 15 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 5

    We grow a broad selection of these wonderful but underutilized native Pawpaws. They are all ultimately 25' and perform best in full sun. Their delicious yellow fruits ripen in September or October and taste like a combination of mango and banana custard. The fruit production is the most prolific when they have a pollinator. The interesting tri-lobed purple brown flowers appear along the stems in mid spring. The beautiful Zebra Swallowtail Butterfly and the Pawpaw Sphinx Moth depend on Asiminas in order to reproduce. Contact us for our cultivar list.

    Height: 25 Feet
    Spread: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Asplenium scolopendrium is an evergreen European fern with a tropical feel, perfect for spicing up the shady border, winter garden, cottage garden, or container with its strappy, bright green fronds that stay lovely and lush all year round. A winner of the coveted Award of Garden Merit by the Royal Horticultural Society for its low maintenance, compact habit and outstanding, long-lasting performance in the garden. The centipede-like brown sori on the undersides of the fronds give this plant its specific epithet, which comes from the Greek term “skolopenda” to describe the creepy-crawlies. Meanwhile, its common name, Hart’s Tongue Fern, refers to the apparent resemblance of the wavy, strappy fronds to a deer’s tongue (a “hart” is a red male deer, also called a “stag”, that is generally older than five years of age). Tolerant of heavy shade, rabbits, and deer browsing.

    Height: 14 Inches
    Spread: 14 Inches
    Zone: 5

    The soft blue flowers of 'Wood's Light Blue' Fall Aster appear on disease resistant foliage in August to September.  Bred for compact habit, long bloom period and heavy flowering; it eventually forms a large mat.  An important source of late season nectar and pollen for bees and butterflies. Try it in the front of a perennial boarder of a container.  Hybridized by Ed Wood in Portland, Oregon.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Wood's Pink' Fall Aster has dark pink flowers with yellow centers over disease resistant foliage. It blooms August to September and forms a large mat eventually. One of the Wood's series, and an Aster which will eventually spread to make a large patch.   'Wood's' selections have shown excellent resistance to mildew and rust.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Wood's Purple' Fall Aster has magenta purple flowers with yellow centers, disease resistant foliage, and blooms August to September. Forms a large mat eventually. Genus name comes from the Latin word aster meaning star for the shape of the flowers. One of the Wood's hybrids.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Avondale’ Blue Wood Aster is a late blooming native, producing lots of small light blue daisies with yellow to burgundy centers. Aster cordifolius ‘Avondale’ starts blooming in late August and lights up woodland margins and meadows well into fall. Unlike most other Asters, ‘Avondale’ is relatively deer resistant. The nectar and pollen are both important sources of food for butterflies and native pollinators and the seeds are loved by sparrows and thrushes. Introduced by North Creek Nurseries. (New name is Symphyotrichum cordifolium).

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Eastern Star' White Wood Aster is shorter than the species and has dark burgundy stems to set off the white daisy-like flowers better. 'Eastern Star' is a low mounding perennial that blooms in September and October.  White Wood Aster tolerates a wide range of soil types and handles dappled shade to full shade.  Plants form colonies from underground rhizomes and tend to self-seed.  Aster divaricatus 'Eastern Star' is a host plant for Pearl Crescent and Checkerspot caterpillars and its winter seeds are enjoyed by songbirds, like goldfinches and juncos.  Found by Roger Rache in a coastal Rhode Island native population, it was first introduced by Canyon Creek Nursery, later grown in our region by Northcreek Nurseries (new name is Eurybia divaricata).

    PRN Preferred:  More compact than the species, flowers even in dry shade.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Aster ericoides ‘Bridal Veil’ is a no-fuss, profuse fall-blooming native perennial that will steal the show from August to October! Stunning, dense clusters of small, white, daisy-like blooms with brownish-yellow centers blanket the multi-branched stems throughout its fall bloom period, inviting a plethora of bees, butterflies, and other pollinator species to delight in the late season nectar. The blooms tend to be so numerous that they completely cover the small, finely textured foliage, which gives almost a bright green, lavender-esque quality to the landscape when not in bloom. It is this delicate, tiny foliage that gives this plant its common name, Heath Aster, for resembling the similarly shaped foliage of Erica (Heath). This plant is tolerant of drought once established, and makes for an excellent addition to the gravel or rock garden. (New name is Symphyotrichum ericoides 'Bridal Veil').

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 40 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Snow Flurry’ White Heath Aster is a native groundcover which performs beautifully in late summer and early fall. The short sturdy stems become covered with white daisy-like flowers which attract pollinators and songbirds. Because of its vigorous stoloniferous habit, Aster ericoides ‘Snow Flurry’ makes a good erosion control choice. The species name ‘ericoides’ refers to the heather-like appearance. (New name is Symphiotricum ericoides ‘Snow Flurry’).

    Height: 8 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Bluebird' Smooth Aster has lots of showy bluish violet flowers in late summer and early fall over clean foliage. 'Bluebird' is a great introduction from the Mt. Cuba Center in Delaware. Ranked as the #1 Aster in an evaluation study at Mt. Cuba Center. Strong stems do not need staking if cutback somewhat in June.  Carl Hesselein's favorite Aster for flower color, disease-free foliage and upright stature in the garden.  (New name is Symphyotricum laeve.)

    PRN Preferred:  Tons of flowers with no staking required. Winner!

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Lady in Black' Calico Aster is an unusual native Aster because the foliage is just as showy as the flower display.  The narrow leaves start the summer as a deep plum or purple, gradually changing to bronze when 'Lady in Black' blooms in late summer and early fall.  It becomes covered with delicate white daisies with rosy pink centers, complimenting the dark foliage and attracting all types of butterflies and other pollinators.  The open habit can be improved by cutting plants back to 6" in June.  This native selection was found in Holland. (New name is Smyphyotrichum lateriflorum.)

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 3

    This naturally occurring hybrid of A. spectabilis and A. macrophylla makes a wonderful addition to a wilder looking garden. Lavender blue flowers cover a rosette of large (for asters) heart shaped leaves in fall time. ‘Twilight’ Big Leaf Aster can handle some shade but best flower production is in moist but well drained full sun locations.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Aster novae-angliae 'Alma Potschke' is a New England Aster with showy deep pinkish rose flowers appearing in late summer and early fall.  The habit is tall, like the native species which lights up the autumn New England Llandscape, but the vibrant fushsia pink color really stands out.  Asters provide a nectar source for butterflies as well as a host plant for their larvae. (New name is Symphyotricum novae-angliae).

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The stunning deep purple daisy flowers of 'Purple Dome' New England Aster appear in August on compact upright plants. A wonderful introduction from a wonderful plantsman, Dr. Richard Lighty, and the Mt. Cuba Center.  Asters naturally grew in moist prairies and meadows in the eastern US thriving in full sun.  Great for erosion control and pollinators love it.  Pinch back stems before mid summer to promoter fuller more floriferous plants, this will also control the height and prevent if from flopping.  Can self-seed so it is best to cutback after flowering to prevent seedling varieties in the garden.  New England Aster is a larval host to the Pearl Crescent Butterfly caterpillar and the Checkerspot Butterfly caterpillar.  It provides nectar for bees, hoverflies, skippers, and butterflies and is especially important as a late-season nectar source for migrating butterflies. (New name is Symphyotricum novae-angliae.)

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3
    'Vibrant Dome' New England Aster is similar in habit to its parent 'Purple Dome', but is somewhat taller, with large brilliant pink flowers in August and September. The other parent is thought to be 'Alma Potschke', and it was found in a garden as a spontaneous seedling. Introduced by our pals at North Creek (New name is Symphyotricum novae-angliae).
    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'October Skies' Aromatic Aster has medium blue flowers in September and October. 'October Skies' is tolerant of dry, poor soil sites. Plants form low mounding colonies from underground rhizomes. 'October Skies' blooms about 2 weeks earlier than 'Raydon's Favorite'.  Loved by butterflies, bees and other pollinators and an important addition to the garden for late fall gardens.  A Primrose Path introduction (New name is Symphyotricum oblongifolium).

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Masses of delicate clear blue flowers appear on 'Raydon's Favorite' Aromatic Aster in September and October. 'Raydon's Favorite' is tolerant of dry, rocky sites which makes sense because it was found in San Antonio, Texas by Raydon Alexander.  Aromatic Aster is adaptable to a wide range of soil conditions and can tolerate heat, pollution, and soil compaction.  Since it's foliage is fragant it is usually left alone by rabbits, rodents, and  deer.  One of famed plantsman, Rick Darke's favorites (New name is Symphyotricum oblongifolium).

    PRN Preferred:  A consistantly excellent performer.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Aster tataricus 'Jin-dai' is a Tatarian Daisy with bluish lavender flowers with yellow centers which bloom from September through November. A. 'Jin-dai' sports large tropical leaves all summer. Found in Japan by Rick Darke and Skip March.  It was discovered at the Jin-Dai Botanical Garden in Tokyo, Japan.  It grows shorter than the species, which can reach 7-8 ft. in height.  Tatarian Daisy can rapidly spread by rhizome. An exceptional long-blooming, dramatic perennial; looks great in combination with ornamental grasses and Solidago varieties.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Dwarf Chinese Astilbe has pinkish lavender flowers in July, and blooms later than most Astilbes. 'Pumila' is a dwarf plant which spreads more quickly than most other Chinese Astilbes, eventually making a large mat, and tolerates drier sites than many Astilbes.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Visions' Chinese Astilbe has vivid pink flowers in July, over attractive lustrous foliage, Chinese Astilbe blooms later than the Arendsii hybrids.

    PRN Preferred:  Better drought tolerance than most other Astilbes, perfect choice for dry shade.  Compact variety.

    Height: 14 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Visions in Pink’ Chinese Astilbe has upright soft pink flower spikes in June and July. Because of the density of the blooms, the flower display is very impressive. Astilbe chinensis cultivars have lustrous dark green foliage, and are more dry site tolerant than earlier flowering Astilbes. The excellent deer resistance makes this a wonderful addition to the woodland garden.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Visions in White' Chinese Astilbe blooms in June and July, producing dense creamy white spikes over glossy green foliage.  'Visions in White' is exciting because of its good tolerance for drier conditions.  Like other Astilbe chinensis cultivars, 'Visions in White' extends the bloom time for Astilbes into early summer.  Excellent for shade gardens and woodland edges.

    Height: 28 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The tall purple flowers of 'Purple Candles' Chinese Astilbe appear in June. Late blooming and relatively dry site tolerant.   Chinese Astilbe varieties are noted for having better sun and drought tolerance than most x arendsii hybrids. Flower stalks can remain for additional ornamental interest in the garden.

    PRN Preferred:  Very tall flower spikes, more drought tolerant.

    Height: 40 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Delft Lace' Astilbe is a very beautiful newcomer to the Plume Flower scene, with dark pinkish salmon buds which open up to fragrant apricot pink delicate plumes, set off by contrasting red stems. The dissected foliage is also attractive, with a silvery overlay on the bluish green leaves. It blooms in June and makes an awesome show.

    PRN Preferred: The delicate dissected leaves and the colorful flowers are tougher and longer lasting than those of most other Astilbes.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Bridal Veil’ Hybrid Astilbe blooms throughout May, with lots of gracefully arching white plumes held above light green fern-like foliage. Astilbe 'Bridal Veil’ is a good addition to a small shade garden, or is lovely in masses in woodland landscapes.  Astilbe x arendsii are hybrids, the result of crosses between Astilbe Chinensis, Astilbe Japonica, Astilbe thunergii, and Astilbe astilboides. These hybrids were developed in Germany by George Arends in the 1920s.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Deutschland' Hybrid Astilbe has lots of white flowers in May and June above light green leaves. A vigorous selection for shady spots, with a strong delightful fragrance.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Erika' Hybrid Astilbe has tall light pink plumes in May and June on reddish stems, bronzy new growth, and an upright habit.   An excellent cut flower that lasts and lasts in the vase.

    Height: 32 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Fanal’ Hybrid Astilbe has arching plumes of deep red flowers in June. The bronzy green foliage clumps have delicate dissected leaves, out of which come the upright flower stems. Astilbe x ‘Fanal’ does best in moist cool sites, and makes a good cut flower.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The plumes of 'Peach Blossom' Hybrid Astilbe are peach with pink undertones in May and June over medium green foliage.  In general, Astilbes are long-lived perennials that are most comfortable when grown in rich soil and light shade to filtered sun. They will grow in full shade, but will not bloom as prolifically there.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Red Sentinel' Hybrid Astilbe has red flowers in May and June on red stems over dark green foliage. A dependable heavy bloomer.  Perfect in a shady spot with dappled light; prefers moisture so water regularly for abundant flowers and nice foliage.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Rheinland' Hybrid Astilbe has fluffy clear pink blooms in May and June over a mound of lush green foliage, adding a light, airy quality.  A tough, reliable Astilbe.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The dense upright plumes of snow white flowers of 'White Gloria' ('Weisse Gloria') Hybrid Astilbe appear in May and June over dark green foliage. Extremely showy in a mass.  It is resistant to rabbits and deer, but attractive to butterflies. 

    Height: 28 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    White Astilboides has tall large Astilbe-like white flowers in June, over huge round dramatic leaves that resemble lily pads.  Leaves can grow to 2-3' in diameter, and have a have table-like surfaces, hence the species name.  Astilboides tabularis pairs well with ferns and hostas.  This hard to find plant will be sure to make a statement in any garden.  Prefers moist sites.  It used to be classified as a Rodgersia.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Lady Fern has green lacy foliage, and is a deciduous clump. It is relatively sun tolerant, in spite of its fine foliage.  Athyrium filix-femina is found in rich moist woods, thickets, fields, meadows and ravines throughout northern North America.  A good filler for moist woodland gardens.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    The medium green delicate foliage of 'Lady in Red' Lady Fern is set off by deep burgundy red stems for a striking effect.  Athyrium filix-femina Lady In Red grows slightly smaller than the species.  A deciduous clump.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Japanese Painted Fern has very showy fronds, soft grayish green with an overlay of silvery hues accented by contrasting dark maroon midribs.  Fronds will become greener with the summer heat.  It is a deciduous creeper. Athyrium nipponicum 'Pictum' was the 2004 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Regal Red’ Japanese Painted Fern lights up shady spots with a beautiful combination of silver and burgundy red coloration on the delicately cut fronds. The dark red is displayed primarily on the interior of the frond, and it leaches outward to bright silver outer edges. Although a slow spreader, Athyrium nipponicum ‘Regal Red’ will eventually colonize a shady location well.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Ghost' Lady Fern is a hybrid of A. filix-femina and A. nipponicum 'Pictum'. This fern combines the best of its parents in its brilliant silvery coloring on a light green background. The habit of Athyrium x 'Ghost' is somewhat upright and the color lights up dark spots amazingly. A deciduous clump which slowly widens, 'Ghost' was found in a garden in Richmond, Virginia as a spontaneous seedling.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Emily Rose' Aucuba is a dark green female selection with superior cold tolerance.  The slender lustrous leaves are evergreen , and make a great setting for the large shiny red fruit.  The berries color up in mid to late winter, and are retained well into the summer, providing a log lasting show.  Any male form planted nearby will provide adequate pollination.  Aucuba 'Emily Rose' was an introduction from Hines Nursery of California.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6
    'Golden King' Aucuba has dark green evergreen leaves that are vividly splashed with yellow. This cultivar is male, so it makes a perfect pollinator for good berry production on Aucuba japonica female plants.
    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Hosoba Hoshifu' Aucuba is a showy evergreen for shady locations, with long narrow shiny green leaves speckled liberally with bright yellow spots.  'Hosoba Hoshifu' is a female Aucuba, which produces shiny red long lasting fruit when planted near a male form (most green and yellow Aucubas are male).  The fruit is large and very showy as it persists throughout the winter.  Plant in a sheltered spot protected from winter winds and afternoon sun. 

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 7

    'Rozannie' Aucuba is a compact evergreen form which has large, very lustrous green leaves.  They look almost artificial because they are so shiny and perfect.  Even more amazing are the enormous bright red berries which remain on 'Rozannie' for several months.  Since birds (and deer) do not eat the fruit, the show goes on for a long time.  A compact female form, tolerant of a wide range of soils.  Per landscape designer Lisa Fernandez, the plant looks lush and gorgeous, even planted in the dreaded super shady corner of Collins Park in Philadelphia.  Nothing had survived there in the past and Aucuba 'Rozannie' has flourished.  

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Aucuba japonica 'Variegata' has shiny green leaves sprinkled with gold spots, and is evergreen. Variegated Japanese Aucuba is often called 'Gold Dust' Aucuba.  Best foliage colors generally occur in part shade locations; the gold spots on the may fade in too much shade.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 6

    The tall white pea-flowered spikes of Baptisia alba var. macrophylla appear in May and June. Black peapods add interest into the fall and winter. A very long lived perennial.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Blue False Indigo, also known as Redneck Lupine, has blue pea-like flowers and glaucous trifoliate leaves.  Asparagus-like buds emerge from the ground in early spring and grow to form a dense bushy long-lived perennial.  Baptisia australis blooms in May and June and is frequented by bees and butterflies.  After flowering deep purple seed pods develop adding interest and sound to the garden.  All Baptisia have deep tap roots and spend the first year or two developing them so site them carefully and expect the real flower show in the third year.  Also Baptisias are very roadside salt and dry site tolerant. 2010 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    PRN Preferred:  Easy to grow and does not grow too big.

    Height: 40 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The yellow pea-shaped flower spikes of Baptisia sphaerocarpa appear in mid summer over disease resistant green foliage. Clump is long lived and increases in size every year.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘American Goldfinch’ False Indigo is a large floriferous Baptisia, with bright yellow spikes of pea-shaped flowers for a prolonged period in late spring and early summer. The flower spikes are followed by large round seed pods which are held above the neat green foliage throughout the summer. Baptisia ‘American Goldfinch’ is a large, problem-free perennial with a very long lifespan, so give it plenty of room when planting. Another great introduction from Walters Gardens.

    Height: 40 Inches
    Spread: 60 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Blue Bubbly’ False Indigo is part of Hans Hansen’s Decadence® Deluxe series. Baptisia ‘Blue Bubbly’ produces 18” spikes of purple blue pea-shaped flowers starting in late spring. Baptisias make large long-lived clumps which tolerate a wide range of soils and conditions. Plant them in the back of sunny perennial beds and don’t plan to move them unless you have a backhoe.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 40 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Blueberry Sundae’ False Indigo is part of the Decadence® Deluxe Series from Walters Gardens. The flower spikes are a deep indigo blue and are produced for an extended period from late spring to early summer. The blue green foliage is clean and attractive, and Baptisia ‘Blueberry Sundae’ displays large black seedpods in the fall. Baptisias are deer resistant and long-lived.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Cherries Jubilee’ False Indigo is one of the Decadence® series from Proven Winners. The peashaped flowers emerge as maroon buds on sturdy spikes in late spring, opening to a combination of maroon and yellow. As the blooms mature, they take on more yellow tones. Baptisia Decadence® ‘Cherries Jubilee’ is relatively compact, and has bluish green clean foliage which has the added advantage of deer resistance.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Dark Chocolate’ False Indigo blooms for an extended period in late spring. The flower spikes are covered with dark brown to purple pea-shaped flowers, crowning the compact habit of Baptisia x ‘Dark Chocolate’. The showy blooms are followed by dark round seedpods in the summer. ‘Dark Chocolate’ False Indigo is another long-lived perennial from the breeding work done by Hans Hansen of Walters Gardens.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Decedence® 'Lemon Meringue' ('CPBR5097') is a new introduction from Hans Hansen's extensive breeding program.  The lemon yellow pea-shaped flowers are held on tall charcoal colored stems above bluish green foliage.  A tough, long lived native perennial, Baptisia 'Lemon Meringue' is a colorful addition to the back of perennial borders as well as an excellent candidate for prairie gardens and dry meadows.  Decadence® Lemon Meringue is drought tolerant, deer resistant and long blooming.   

    PRN Preferred: Attractive contrast between the bright yellow flowers and the charcoal stems.

    Height: 46 Inches
    Spread: 48 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Pink Truffles’ False Indigo is in the exciting Decadence® Deluxe series from Hans Hansen and Walters Gardens. The soft pink pea-shaped flowers emerge in late spring and cover the tall green spikes. They age to a soft lavender and the green summer seed capsules turn black in the fall. Bees and pollinators love Baptisia ‘Pink Truffles’, which is extremely long lived like its siblings.  

    Height: 54 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Sparkling Sapphires’ False Indigo is another great new Baptisia cross from the amazing work of Hans Hansen. Baptisia ‘Sparkling Sapphires’ produces violet blue flower spikes in late spring through early summer, attracting butterflies and pollinators. The habit is somewhat compact for a Baptisia. Large black seed pods follow the flower display in summer, adding another interesting visual note.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Decadence® 'Vanilla Cream' False Indigo has 10" spikes of vanilla pea-shaped flowers in May and June.  The petioles are dark gray, making an attractive contrast to the opening flowers.  The clean disease free foliage matures to grayish green in summer, making a wide clump topped by dark charcoal round seedheads.  Baptisias are very long lived perennials and are useful in the back of mixed borders as well as in meadows.  From Hans Hansen's Decadence® series.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 42 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Pink Lemonade’ False Indigo is an unusual bicolor Baptisia from the extraordinary work of Hans Hansen. The peashaped buds of the flower spikes emerge a soft yellow in late spring. As the flowers mature, they take on hues of raspberry pink, set off by charcoal stems. Since the spikes continue to produce flowers for an extended time, both colors are on display simultaneously. Baptisia ‘Pink Lemonade’ is part of Proven Winners’ Decadence® Deluxe series.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 48 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Begonia grandis, commonly referred to as Hardy Begonia with its hardiness zone of 6-9, is the only Begonia capable of surviving through Mid-Atlantic winters. Drooping clusters of fragrant, pink inflorescences attract pollinators from July to October. Hardy Begonia is a great consideration for woodland sites with Black Walnut trees due to this plant’s resistance to the allelopathic properties and its capability of handling partial to heavy shade. Begonia grandis prefers moist, well-drained, organic soils, and will reproduce by small bulblets as well as by self-seeding in ideal conditions. Plants will do best if given winter protection.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 6

    ‘Freckle Face’ Blackberry Lily has several seasons of interests, with flowers in late summer followed by seedheads in fall and early winter. The 2” showy flowers are produced in quantity, displaying bright orange petals with lots of red dots. The seedheads emerge in fall and look like blackberries because of the shiny black berry clusters. Belamcanda chinensis ‘Freckle Face’ is an improvement on the pale orange species, and comes from Walters Gardens in Michigan.

    Height: 20 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Hello Yellow’ Blackberry Lily makes for a very bright splash of color in late summer when most other perennials are praying for reprieve from the heat and humidity. This Iris relative also boasts wonderful seedheads that I remember, fondly, playing with as a child like little maracas.

    Height: 20 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 4
    Bergenia x 'Bressingham White' has white flowers in April and May over shiny green leaves which turn bronze in the fall. It is evergreen. Hybridized by Alan Bloom of England.
    Height: 15 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Bergenia x DRAGONFLY ‘Sakura’ is a versatile, evergreen groundcover that is great for adding color to borders, pathways and mass plantings with part or close to full shade. Upright clusters of semi-double, hot pink flowers reminiscent of cherry blossoms appear from mid-March to early May, and make excellent cut flowers when used in fresh arrangements. Likewise, the foliage, a dark greenish-purple that turns a deep blackish, reddish purple in winter, is also an excellent addition to floral arrangements. The common name of this plant, Pig Squeak (which is arguably the greatest common name ever), refers to the sound the leaves make when rubbed together due in part to the thick, rubbery, foliage texture.

    Height: 10 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Dura-Heat® ('BNMTF') River Birch has lighter bark than Heritage® Birch, showing lovely whitish tan exfoliating bark at a young age.  Since it hails from Georgia, its heat tolerance is excellent, with the result that its compact dark green leaves are retained all summer.  The fall color is yellow, and its striking bark makes it a particularly welcome addition to the winter landscape.  Like all River Birches, Dura-Heat® is very tolerant of wet sites and resistant to typical Birch diseases.

    Height: 40 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Heritage® ('Cully') Riverbirch is one of the best Birches for the Northeast.  Discovered in a St. Louis suburb and tested and introduced by the extraordinary plantsman Earl Cully. Noted for it's cold hardiness, beautiful creamy exfoliating bark, disease and borer resistant, wet site tolerant, fast growth habit, we could go on and on...

    Height: 50 Feet
    Spread: 30 Feet
    Zone: 3

    ‘Dragon Lady’ Crossvine produces showy salmon red trumpet-shaped flowers in early to mid summer. Bignonia ‘Dragon Lady’ is vigorous and fast growing, so it does well on strong tall trellises. The semi-evergreen dark green foliage turns shades of bronze and purple in fall. ‘Dragon Lady’ should be pruned vigorously just after blooming to keep it neat and tidy.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Hardy Orchid has rosy purple flowers in May, like miniature Cattleyas.  It is a native of the grassy slopes of central and southern Japan and the cool mountain slopes of China.  Over time is will naturalize and slowly spread.  Bletilla striata prefers moist, well drained soil but will handle some dryness once established. Best planted in spring or early summer.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Side-oats Grama blooms in late summer and early fall, producing interesting side bracts (‘spikelets’) which hang down on one side of the stems. As the seeds mature, they dry to an attractive tan which looks like oats moving in the breeze. Bouteloua curtipendula is a Tall Grass Prairie Plant, growing vigorously in warm weather. It is a larval host for several skipper butterflies and moths, and the mature seedheads feed a multitude of birds and small mammals.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 3

    It’s no surprise that the specific epithet of Bouteloua gracilis means “graceful” – ­­the gentle sway of peculiar-looking seedheads in a warm summer breeze certainly brings a sense of grace to the garden. Highly tolerant of nutrient-poor, dry soils and drought once established, Blue Gramma grass is naturally adapted to prairie conditions and can be found growing throughout the Great Plains of North America. Bouteloua gracilis is a warm-season native grass that explodes with color in autumn, following the arrival of the bronzy purple eyebrow-shaped inflorescences between June and August. These inflorescences, which are situated to one side of the stem, persist throughout autumn and often into winter, changing from a warm purply overtone to a sandy-colored seedhead appearance that is perfect for adding to dried arrangements. Blue Gramma grass can be used as a lawn alternative, and is capable of handling some light foot traffic as well as occasional mowing.

    Height: 14 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Blonde Ambition' Blue Grama is a lovely low maintenance native grass which has unusually shaped inflorescences. The orange to straw colored flowers are held horizontally off the stems, so that they look like tiny feathers.  'Blonde Ambition' produces chartreuse flowers (instead of purple for the species) on taller flowering stems.  This is especially lovely when back lit by afternoon sun. When planted in mass, Bouteloua 'Blonde Ambition' can serve as an infrequently mowed lawn, since it does best in full sun. It was introduced by David Salman of High Country Gardens, and brought to our attention by Steve Castorani of North Creek Nurseries.

    PRN Preferred:  A fun whimsy appeal, what other grass has horizontal seedhead that last well into the winter?

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The beautiful seed heads of Quaking Grass start appearing in June and are a wonderful addition to cut and dry flower arrangements. Seed heads make a lovely sound in the wind. Prefers a dry, well drained site.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Heartleaf Brunnera blue forget-me-not-like flowers which appear over heart-shaped leaves for eight to ten weeks starting in early to mid-spring through June.  Due to the rough texture of the leaves, deer and rabbits tend to leave Brunnera macrophylla alone.  A native to several regions of Eastern Europe and Asia, it must have a moist spot and part to full shade. A slow spreader and will also self-seed.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3
    'Jack Frost' Heartleaf Brunnera has blue flowers in mid to late spring. The green foliage has a showy silver overlay. Cool shady conditions are best. 2012 Perennial Plant of the Year, introduced by Walters Gardens.
    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Silver Heart' Heartleaf Brunnera blooms in April and May, with cobalt blue flowers held over stunning silver and green heart-shaped leaves.  The leaves are similar to the other new silver-laced cultivars but Brunnera 'Silver Heart' has thicker, more pubescent foliage, so it tolerates our hot East Coast summers better.  All Brunneras perform best with moderate but consistent moisture, and the effect of the large blue flowers over the silver foliage is spectacular in the spring.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Black Knight' Butterfly Bush boasts fragrant purplish violet flowers starting in late June. This Buddleia has a vigorous and large habit, and blooms all summer into fall.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Miss Molly' Butterfly Bush starts blooming in July and continues all summer without deadheading.  The fragrant flowers are pinkish rub red and plentiful.  Buddleia davidii 'Miss Molly' is a midsized Butterfly Bush, so it works well in the back of perennial beds as well as a low hedge.  Butterflies and hummingbirds consume the nectar all summer.  Another beauty from Dr Dennis Werner of NC State, who crossed 'Miss Ruby' with 'Attraction' to produce 'Miss Molly'.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5
    'Miss Ruby' Butterfly Bush is about as close to red as a Buddleia gets. Since it results from a cross with B. 'White Ball', its habit is more compact than its other parent, B. 'Attraction'. Developed by Dr. Dennis Werner of the JC Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh, North Carolina.
    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Flutterby Petite® 'Blue Heaven' ('Podaras #8') Butterfly Bush is a new introduction to the groundcover Buddleia world, with blue fragrant flowers all summer over low growing silvery foliage. It is largely sterile, and is a great nectar source for hummingbirds, butterflies and other insects. A Ball Ornamentals introduction from hybridizing work by Peter Podaras.

    PRN Preferred: Although quite compact in habit, Petite® ‘Blue Heaven’ is a very heavy bloomer all summer and shows better cold tolerance than many other ‘dwarf’ Buddleias. 

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Lo & Behold Ruby Chip® (‘SMNBDD’) Butterfly Bush has the same shocking pink blooms as Buddleia ‘Miss Molly’, but on a dense compact habit. The flowers start in June and are produced all summer, especially if occasionally deadheaded. The green deer resistant foliage is dense and tight, so Buddleia Ruby Chip® makes a great addition to sunny perennial borders. Megan Mathey of Spring Meadows Nursery is the breeder of this dwarf beauty.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 6
    'Blue Chip' Butterfly Bush carries short bright blue fragrant flowers on a very neat, compact plant. It blooms throughout the summer without the need for deadheading or trimming, which makes it particularly useful in perennial plantings. From Dr. Dennis Werner at the JC Raulston Arboretum.
    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 6

    'Purple Haze' Butterfly Bush is an exciting new groundcover Buddleia with a low mounding habit and an all summer display of bluish purple fragrant flowers. The foliage is green, the flowering branches are arching, and the flowers are sterile. Another breakthrough from Dr. Dennis Werner of NCSU.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Pugster Blue® ('SMNBDBT') Butterfly Bush blooms throughout the summer and into the fall, producing large blue flowers on sturdy short stems. The growth habit of Buddleia x Pugster Blue® is very compact, making this a good candidate for containers and perennial borders. The blooms are fragrant, and attract butterflies and other pollinators all summer. The Pugster® series from Spring Meadow shows better winter cold tolerance than other dwarf Buddleias.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Pugster Pinker® (‘SMNBDB’) Butterfly Bush has large deep pink fragrant flower spikes on a compact, sturdy plant all summer. The Pugster® series shows good cold tolerance and does not require pruning because of the neat compact habit. Megan Mathey is the breeder and Spring Meadow Nurseries is the introducer through the Proven Winners® program.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Pugster White® (‘SMNBDW’) Butterfly Bush is a compact but sturdy Buddleia, with large fragrant white flowers. The short stature means that the Buddleia x Pugster White® does not need the pruning that earlier large cultivars have required. Also, the Pugster® series is somewhat more cold tolerant than several earlier Buddleia cultivars. This would make a good potted plant for sunny patios in summer.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Pugster® Amethyst ('SMNBDL') Butterfly Bush is a more cold tolerant compact Buddleia, with large lavender purple blooms on short sturdy stems.  Pugster® Amethyst starts blooming in June and keeps on flowering until early fall.  A Spring Meadows introduction, this Buddleia is recommended for use in rock gardens, perennial beds and tighter sites than most Buddleia can handle.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    NewGen™ Freedom® (‘SB300’) Boxwood comes from years of testing by Saunders Brothers Nursery of Virginia, in their Boxwood Blight resistance trials. Freedom® and Independence® are both highly resistant to both Blight and Boxwood Leafminer. Buxus NewGen™ Freedom® is the taller of the two, with a rounded but vigorous habit. It makes a beautiful green hedge or foundation planning, and benefits from a light yearly pruning to maintain the tight shape.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    New Gen™ Independence (‘SB108’) Boxwood was found as a chance seedling near Williamsburg, VA. The Boxwood Kings of Saunders Brothers selected it after years of observing Independence® because of its proven excellent resistance to both Boxwood Blight and Boxwood Leafminer. Buxus New Gen™ Independence® is the best replacement for English Boxwood in size and shape. The evergreen foliage maintains its deep green color well in the winter.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Little Missy' Little Leaf Boxwood is an excellent substitute for Buxus 'Justin Brouwers' is areas where Boxwood Blight is increasingly a problem.  The Buxus microphylla cultivars are much more resistant to the effects of the blight, and 'Little Missy', with it's compact mounding habit and diminutive size works well where really small Boxwoods are needed.  The leaves are lustrous dark green and tolerate sun well.  Buxus 'Little Missy' does well with trimming, so it can be used to make knot gardens and short formal hedges.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Baby Gem™ ('Gregem') Little Leaf Boxwood is a sport of Buxus 'Winter Gem' with a tighter habit and neater foliage.  Although Buxus Baby Gem™ eventually reaches the size of its parent, it is slower growing and needs little pruning.  The summer color is a good dark green, and Baby Gem™ does not bronze in winter.  An introduction from Greenleaf Nursery of Oklahoma.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Jim Stauffer' Little Leaf Boxwood is a vigorous and formal microphylla cross, with good cold tolerance.  Buxus microphylla var. japonica 'Jim Stauffer' maintains a neat rounded habit with little pruning, and makes an attractive foundation plant or tight hedge.  This Boxwood has shown good resistance to both Boxwood Blight and Leaf miner.  

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Dee Runk' Common Boxwood has glossy dark green foliage that makes its conical shape a standout. It is evergreen, disease resistant and slow growing and is an exciting newcomer to the Boxwood scene.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Fastigiate Common Boxwood has dark green foliage which often has a bluish cast to the evergreen leaves.  The habit is a neat upright cone, somewhat wider at the base than B. 'Dee Runk'.  Buxus s. 'Fastigiata' shows minimal bronzing in the winter, and makes an impressive formal specimen.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Vardar Valley' Common Boxwood is an unusually tough Buxus sempervirens, with excellent insect and disease resistance coupled with attractive green foliage that has a distinctive bluish cast.  It was found by Edgar Anderson of the Arnold Arboretum and Missouri Botanical Garden in 1945, along a river in Macedonia.  After years of observation it was named and released by the Arnold Arboretum because of its proven excellence.  Slow growing and compact, it forms an excellent low maintenance shrub for shady locations.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    If you’re looking for a roundy-moundy, compact Boxwood, look no further than the reliable Buxus ‘Green Mound’. Basically, this Boxwood has all of the classic qualities that are constantly sought after in this particular plant: year-round, glossy evergreen foliage, an incredibly round, dense, compact habit that doesn’t require much re-shaping, and natural deer resistance that keeps Buxus ‘Green Mound’ a tidy, immaculate specimen throughout the seasons that gets about as wide as it does tall, between 2-3’ all over. Some foliar bronzing may occur during the cooler months, although ‘Green Mound’ boxwood tends to hold on to its glossy green color in winter better than other Boxwood varieties.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 4

    A cross between B. sinica var. insularis and B. sempervirens, 'Green Gem' Boxwood is a slow growing round evergreen that combines excellent hardiness with good winter color. An introduction by Sheridan Nurseries of Ontario, Canada.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 4
    'Green Mountain' Little Leaf Boxwood has a pyramidal shape and small evergreen leaves that show some bronzing in winter. Buxus x 'Green Mountain' is from selections made at Sheridan Nurseries of Ontario.
    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Green Velvet' Boxwood is a very hardy selection from Sheridan Nurseries in Canada. Glossy evergreen foliage on a round maintenance free shrub.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Korean Feather Reed Grass has beautiful airy pinkish inflorescences in September, above strong green foliage. It is shade and moist site tolerant and blooms much later than other Feather Reed Grasses.  Calamagrostis brachytricha does sometimes self-seed but is manageable.

    PRN Preferred:  Unsurpassed inflorescenses in the shade, combines with other perennials in mass for a striking impact.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Calamagrostis x acutiflora 'Karl Foerster' has tan seedheads, is early blooming and has an upright habit; it starts blooming in mid June. A 2001 Perennial Plant of the Year, 'Karl Foerster' Feather Reed Grass was named after our friend Tim Foerster's cousin, the great German nurseryman. The blooms have a wheat-like appearance and are a good cut flower.  Winter foliage is a pale tan, and 'Karl Foerster' shows excellent salt tolerance.  Karl Foerster found this lovely spontaneous cross at the Hamburg Botanical Gardens.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Overdam' Feather Reed Grass has green and white foliage and tan upright inflorescences. Thriving in both sun and shade, this is one of our favorite grasses. Winter color is a whitish tan.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The pale blue flowers of Calamintha nepeta 'Blue Cloud' appear during the summer over delicate, fragrant foliage. It reblooms well if cut back after initial blooming. Dry site tolerant. Bees, butterflies and insects love the flowers and we lovethe minty fragrance of the foliage.  Calamintha makes a great filler in the garden and can also be used as an edging.  Native to Europe and the Mediterranean region.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5
    'White Cloud' Calamint has lots of white flowers from June to October above fragrant oregano-like leaves. A dry site tolerant plant. From Canyon Creek Nursery in California. A great food source for bees and insects.
    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Calamint is a tough informal-looking groundcover that is covered with small fragrant white to lilac flowers from mid summer to early fall. The grayish-green delicate foliage has a minty fragrance which makes it deer and rabbit resistant. Leaves may be dried for potpourris or sachets. Pollinators flock to the blooms. Calamintha nepeta subsp. nepeta is a good addition to walls and rock gardens.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 5

    American Beautyberry has pinkish lavender flowers in June and July that produce magenta violet fruit along the stems for a spectacular fall show.  It is best to remove old canes for rejuvenation of the shrub because the flowers and fruits appear on new shoots.   Best fruiting is in full sun but plants will tolerate light shade.  Callicarpa americana berries are a good food source for songbirds and small mammals.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 7

    'Early Amethyst' Beautyberry abounds with large quantities of small lilac fruits in the fall. Originally from Brookside Gardens in Maryland.  This is the same plant as C. 'Issai', per Barry Yinger.  Purple beautyberry is easy to grow and low maintenance and once established are quite drought tolerant.  Planting in mass improves cross-pollination and fruit production.  Small mammals and birds eat the fruit.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Wine Cups or Purple Poppymallow is a native groundcover which forms a wide sprawling mat of green dissected leaves. The large magenta-purple cup-shaped flowers appear from late spring through summer, and are especially showy on sunny days. Callirhoe involucrata produces a deep tap roof, which makes it tolerant of dry conditions but difficult to move.  Will flourish in hot, sunny west facing beds and slopes or spilling over walls.  Host plant for Gray Hairstreak. The sprawling habit would make Wine Cups a good candidate rock gardens.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Calycanthus floridus has dark maroon flowers in May and June that are often fragrant.  Plants will vary from no scent to highly fragrant; the flower fragrance has been described as a combination of melon, pineapple, strawberry, and banana.  Sweetshrub is wet site and dry shade tolerant and the fall color is yellow.  Sweetshrub is also referred to as Carolina Allspice and is native from Virginia to Florida.  Sweetshrub's leaves are aromatic when bruised and the shrub will sucker and often forms colonies in the wild.  Calycanthus is distantly related to Magnolias.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Athens' ('Katherine') Sweetshrub has yellow flowers in May and June that are consistently fragrant. A great introduction from Dr. Michael Dirr in Athens, Georgia; originally provided to him by Mrs. Symmes.  It was named after his daughter Katherine. It is wet site tolerant.  Cut branches can be brought inside to provide strong fragrance.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Michael Lindsey' Sweetshrub has reddish brown flowers that are consistently, gorgeously fragrant, blooming for a prolonged period in April and May over dark, lustrous green foliage. Fall color of is clear yellow to gold. Selected by Allen Bush of Holbrook Farm & Nursery in North Carolina and named after the young son of one of his staff members. Per Dr. Michael Dirr, “Calycanthus floridus 'Michael Lindsey' is the standard by which other introduction will be measured." It is also wet site tolerant. Extremely verticillium resistant per Rick Darke.

    PRN Preferred:  Heavy bloomer, fragrant flowers, lustrous foliage with good fall color.  Reblooms sporadically throughout the summer.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Burgundy Spice' Sweetshrub represents a radical color change in Calycanthus foliage, with lustrous deep burgundy leaves throughout the summer.  We selected for darker foliage over a number of years, coming up with 2 beautiful purple colored sports.  We chose the best one to name Calycanthus floridus var purpureus 'Burgundy Spice'.  The maroon flowers appear in May and June, and have the classic mango and pineapple fragrance of good Sweetshrub selections.  The fall foliage adds another season of enjoyment, turning attractive shades of yellow and amber.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Hartlage Wine' Sweetshrub has amazing reddish maroon flowers with yellow centers starting in May and continuing to fall. A very exciting Sweetshrub named after an extraordinary plantsman, Dr. J.C. Raulston, developed by Richard Hartlage and the JC Raulston Arboretum. It used to sport my favorite plant name, xSinocalycalycanthus x raulstonii.

    PRN Preferred: The showy red and yellow flowers are produced throughout the summer.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5
    Camellia japonica 'Greensboro Red' has semi-double, trumpet-shaped light red flowers on an upright plant in April and May. The original plant came from England in the early 1800's and was such a favorite in Greensboro, NC, that it was named the 'City Flower'. 'Greensboro Red' Camellia is evergreen and a spring bloomer.
    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Korean Fire' Camellia has bright red single flowers on an upright plant. A very cold-hardy Camellia, considered one of the best of the C. japonica cultivars.  Introduction found by Barry Yinger in Korea. Blooms in April and May and is evergreen.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Camellia ‘Victory White’ is a spring blooming japonica selection which produces large white anemone-form flowers in April and May. ‘Victory White’ Camellia was introduced from Japan by K Sawada in the 1930s. The habit is vigorous and upright, with lustrous evergreen foliage. The semi-double white flowers have bright yellow stamens crowning the centers.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 6

    ‘Kanjiro’ Camellia blooms in late fall and early winter, producing masses of semi-double cerise pink flowers. The evergreen foliage is lustrous and dark green. Camellia sasanqua ‘Kanjiro’ is a zone 7 Camellia, so it needs to be planted in a protected location, avoiding exposure to afternoon sunlight and winter winds. The reward for siting it correctly will be lots and lots of flowers.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 7

    ‘Yuletide’ Camellia blooms in late fall and early winter (hence the cultivar name). The single red flowers have showy yellow stamens in the centers of the flowers. Camellia sasanqua ‘Yuletide’ has an upright but compact habit, with lustrous dark green evergreen leaves. Since ‘Yuletide’ is a zone 7 Camellia, it should be planted in a sheltered spot and protected from winter winds and afternoon sun.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 7

    Camellia x 'April Blush' has semi-double blush pink flowers with yellow anthers in April and May. An introduction from Dr. Clifford Parks, 'April Blush' is an evergreen spring blooming Camellia.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Camellia x 'April Kiss' has rosy red formal double flowers and an upright habit and heavy bud set. 'April Kiss' is a Dr. Clifford Parks selection that blooms in April and May and is evergreen.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'April Remembered' Camellia is an early spring blooming evergreen, at its peak in April.  The large semi-double flowers are a creamy soft pink, with yellow stamens accenting the centers.  This is another zone 6 beauty from Dr. Clifford Parks and Camellia Forest Nursery, and it is equally useful as a specimen or as a hedge.  Just make sure it has wind and sun protection in the winter.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Camellia x 'April Rose' has double rosy pink formal flowers and blooms in April and May. 'April Rose' Camellia is an introduction from Dr. Clifford Parks and is evergreen.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Camellia x 'April Snow' has white rose-form flowers and blooms in April and May. 'April Snow' Camellia is an introduction from Dr. Clifford Parks and is evergreen.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Camellia x 'April Tryst' has showy red anemone-form flowers, and is an introduction from Dr. Clifford Parks. It is spring blooming and evergreen.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Arctic Rose' Camellia has rosy red formal double flowers displayed on an upright plant. It is evergreen and blooms in April and May.  From Dr. Ackerman's breeding work.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    ‘Ashton’s Pride’ Camellia is one of the hardier fall blooming Camellias, producing semi-double soft pink flowers in November and December. Pollinators take advantage of the pollen producing yellow stamens. Camellia x ‘Ashton’s Pride’ is a cross between Camellia japonica and Camellia oleifera, hybridized by Dr. William Ackerman at his farm in Ashton, Maryland. Protect from winter sun and wind for best results.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6

    ‘Londontowne Blush’ Camellia is a hardy C. oleifera cross with C. japonica, and produces single soft pink blooms in November and December. The shiny evergreen foliage is displayed on a rounded compact habit. Camellia x ‘Londontowne Blush’ is another cold tolerant hybrid from Dr. Ackerman and the National Arboretum.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Camellia x 'Long Island Pink' has single pink flowers that bloom in the fall and a nice compact habit. 'Long Island Pink' Camellia was found on Long Island, NY and is evergreen.

    PRN Preferred:  A compact neat form, very cold tolerant.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Northern Exposure' Camellia blooms for an extended period in late fall and early winter.  The pale pink flower buds open to large white blooms set off by bright yellow stamens.  'Northern Exposure' always sets multiple buds, and since they open progressively over several months, the flower display is a very showy addition to the late fall garden.  Like all Camellias, 'Northern Exposure' has lustrous green evergreen leaves and prefers shade and protection from winter winds.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6
    'Pink Icicle' Camellia blooms in April and May, with large clear pink semi-double flowers. It is upright and evergreen; yet another beautiful hybrid from Dr. William Ackerman.
    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Snow Flurry' Camellia produces a large quantity of double and semi-double white flowers in late fall and early winter.  Resulting from a complex series of crosses by Dr. William Ackerman and the National Arboretum, 'Snow Flurry' has shown excellent cold tolerance.  The habit is somewhat floppy when young, and periodic pruning before the emergence of new growth would help with that.  Evergreen and shade loving, Camellia x 'Snow Flurry' is a great addition to the winter garden.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Camellia x 'Spring's Promise' has single reddish salmon flowers in spring, with some blooms opening consistently in the fall. It has glossy evergreen foliage.

    PRN Preferred:  Blooms in both spring and fall.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Survivor' Camellia blooms in early fall, with large single white fragrant flowers that start out tipped by soft pink on the ends of the petals. It is evergreen and upright in habit. Its name indicates its excellent cold hardiness, and it results from a C. sasanqua and C. oleifera cross made by Dr. Clifford Parks.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Camellia x 'Winter's Joy' has a semi-double fuchsia pink flower on a narrow upright form. Makes a good hedge in shady locations. From Dr. William Ackerman, Camellia x 'Winter's Joy' is fall blooming and evergreen.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6

    The flowers of 'Winter's Snowman' Camellia are a white, semi-double anemone-form. From Dr. William Ackerman, Camellia x 'Winter's Snowman' is fall blooming and evergreen with a narrow upright habit.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Winter's Star' Camella has light pinkish lavender single flowers starting in October on an open habit. From Dr. William Ackerman, Camellia x 'Winter's Star' is fall blooming and evergreen. Makes an excellent hedge for shady locations.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6

    ‘Winter's Star White’ Camellia comes from the prolific work of Dr. William Ackerman of Maryland fame. Camellia x ‘Winter’s Star White’ is a cross between Camellia oleifera and Camellia hiemalis, which gives it excellent cold tolerance. The flowers appear in late fall and early winter, crowning the lustrous evergreen foliage. They are single white blooms, and they bloom earlier than Camellia japonicas, so they tend not to be affected by winter freezes.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6

    ‘Rapido Blue’ Carpathian Bellflower blooms from late spring into early summer, producing a cloud of violet blue bell-shaped flowers over a mat of ground hugging green foliage. Campanula carpatica ‘Rapido Blue’ is an earlier bloomer than older cultivars of Carpathian Bellflowers, and produces very uniform growth. Because of its excellent tolerance, ‘Rapido Blue’ would be a beautiful addition to shady green roofs.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 8 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Rapido White’ Carpathian Bellflower is covered with white bell-shaped flowers starting in late spring. Campanula carpatica ‘Rapido White’ is a good summer rebloomer if deadheaded after the initial heavy flowering. ‘Rapido White’ makes a refined groundcover and is a good addition to rock gardens and mixed containers for sunny locations.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 8 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Adriatic Bellflower forms a mat of bright yellow foliage topped by clusters of star-shaped light blue flowers in late spring. The species was discovered growing at the base of Italy’s Mt. Gargano in 1827.  Campanula garganica ‘Dickson’s Gold’ performs best when protected by light shade. The habit is vigorous, spreads indefinitely by prostrate to decumbent stems to make a low golden mat eventually.   

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Freya' Clustered Bellflower is covered with lilac purple star-shaped flowers in May and June. The foliage is green and somewhat pubescent, and flowers for almost 4 weeks.  Campanula glomerata 'Freya' is more floriferous than the straight species, with its flower stems comprising about 2/3 of the height of the plant.  An introduction from Arie Blom of the Netherlands.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Amongst some of the most popular perennials are the Bellflowers with their nodding, indigo-purple, cup-shaped flowers. A wonderful choice for edges, borders and container plantings, the trailing habit of Campanula portenschlagiana ‘Birch Hybrid’ makes an adaptable groundcover and can be used for planting in wall crevices. This low-growing dwarf hybrid produces vigorous blooms throughout the summer into the fall, from June to September, and will undergo an extended bloom period if spent flowers are removed. Considered to be evergreen in mild winter climates, and prefers part shade in warmer summer climates.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Harebell or Bluebell is found in many locations, particularly in Scotland (as well as the Midwest). The fine green foliage clumps produce delicate stems that are topped by light blue nodding flowers in clumps in early summer. If deadheaded, Campanula rotundifolia will rebloom, especially in cooler climates. Harebells are a good choice for naturalizing, as they seed themselves well in woodland edges.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Iridescent Bells' ('Irbella') Bellflower blooms in June and July, with fragrant light lavender bell-shaped flowers which emerge from eggplant purple buds.  Visited by bees and hummingbirds, 'Iridescent Bells' is the perfect addition to cottage gardens and the perennial boarder; a good cut flower.  The green foliage is clean and Campanula 'Iridescent Bells' has an upright habit, displaying the hanging flowers nicely.  If deadheaded after blooming this Bellflower reblooms in the late summer and early fall.  A Burpee Introduction which has been praised by the Royal Horticultural Society.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Kent Belle' Canterbury Bells is a long blooming beautiful perennial which produces 2" violet blue hanging bells from June through August. The flowers are produced in quantity, bending the stems over with their weight at times. Campanula x 'Kent Belle' spreads slowly to make a good sized clump, and is very attractive in both sunny and shady mixed perennial beds. The long stems make lovely cut flowers. An introduction from England.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Pink Octopus' Bellflower has very unusually shaped blooms which actually look like pink Octopuses.  The hanging bright pink petals are very narrow and long, and are carried above fuzzy dissected leaves.  Campanula x 'Pink Octopus' spreads rapidly in average soil, making a showy groundcover when in bloom in June and July.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Sarastro' Bellflower is a hybrid from Sarastro Nursery in Austria, producing a neat green clump with beautiful dark purple downward facing bells held on 18" spikes.  Campanula x 'Sarastro' is a cross between C. punctata and C. trachelium, hybridized by Christian Kress.  Most Campanulas need cool summer temperatures to thrive, but 'Sarastro' Bellfloower is much more heat tolerant, which makes it a good candidate for mid Atlantic perennial gardens.  Use as a slow groundcover, or naturalized on the edge of the woods.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Morning Calm' Chinese Trumpetcreeper has huge open-faced flowers that are orange, apricot and yellow.  Flowers are very attractive to hummingbirds.  Slower growing and more woody, Campsis grandiflora 'Morning Calm' knows its place in the landscape better than the native form. The species is native to eastern and southeastern China.  'Morning Calm' was introduced by the JC Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh, NC in the mid 1980s.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Stromboli' Trumpet Vine has very large open-faced deep red flowers that start appearing in mid July.  The bloom period is into August, and 'Stromboli' produces a quantity of 3" trumpets throughout its blooming season.  This native vine is an important summer food source for hummingbirds.

    Height: 40 Feet
    Zone: 5

    White-tinged Sedge is a native clump-forming Carex with arching thread-like foliage. The fine texture of Carex albicans makes it an excellent lawn substitute for shady locations with dry to moist soil conditions. The insignificant scaly flower spikes emerge in May and are interesting but not showy. Since Carex albicans self-seeds, it can make an effective groundcover for erosion control. Intermingle with other shade loving flowering perennials.

    Height: 20 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Eastern Narrowleaf sedge is an attractive green fine bladed native which thrives in both moist and dry shady sites.  The habit is somewhat upright and Carex amphiloba forms a compact evergreen clump.  This shiny green sedge makes an excellent substitute for Liriope; especially in gardens where "Native" is the choice.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Appalachian Sedge is a fine-textured green clump-forming Carex that performs really well in very shady dry woodlands. The habit is arching, like a green fountain, so Appalachian Sedge is particularly attractive in mixed shade containers.  This cool-season sedge looks its best in the spring and fall, and its leaves that turn a nice straw color during the winter.  Grows well on slopes and is a host plant for several caterpillars. The very fine texture makes it a great filler plant.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Cherokee Sedge is an increasingly rare native that tolerates a wide range of conditions throughout the Southeast. The fine green foliage is fountain-like in habit, and the clumps slowly widen to make a natural looking groundcover. It tolerates dry conditions but is happiest in moist sites. Since it is deer resistant as well as at home in both sun and shade, this Carex deserves more usage.  Avoid hard cutback.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Carex divulsa or Grassland Sedge has fine green arching leaves emerging gracefully from the central clumps.  Carex divulsa makes an attractive substitute for grass in areas where there is tree cover, and spreads to make a neat green groundcover in areas of sun or shade.  It is evergreen in warmer winters, and low maintenance at all times.  The small interesting flower stalks or culms emerge from the foliage in April, turning bronze as they mature.

    Height: 15 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Rare and endangered in its natural habitat, Carex eburnea is a gem of a native sedge that provides fine, delicate texture to the shady, dry landscape. In areas with partial to full shade and rocky or sandy soils, Bristle-leaf Sedge can be used as a lawn alternative, although it is most commonly used as a soft textural accent to the front or edge of the rock garden or dry shade border. Carex eburnea makes a lovely groundcover when allowed to naturalize, and if left to its own devices in a large space, may colonize by rhizome. Deer tend to ignore Bristle-leaf Sedge, leaving its elegant foliage intact, although this particular species requires partial shade in order to thrive.

    Height: 8 Inches
    Spread: 8 Inches
    Zone: 2

    'Blue Zinger' Glaucous Sedge has beautiful grayish blue foliage that is similar in color to Festuca 'Elijah Blue', but 'Blue Zinger' is much more tolerant of different sites, going from shade to full sun. Carex flacca 'Blue Zinger' spreads rapidly to make a good tight groundcover.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Gray's Sedge is a tall Carex which thrives in wet and shady locations.  The light green semi-evergreen foliage grows 2', and is topped by 3' flower stems.  The blooms rapidly turn to fascinating 1" spiky stars which are attractive in flower arrangements, fresh or dried.  Carex grayi thrives in moist to wet conditions, so it naturally occurs along stream banks and edges of ponds.  It is a striking addition to rain gardens and bioswales, and tolerates full sun if kept moist.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Bunny Blue® ('Hobb') Glaucous Woodland Sedge has steel blue evergreen foliage produced by a neat, easily divisible clump. Carex Blue Bunny® prefers a woodland location, but will tolerate sun if the moisture is good. Because of its bright color and neat habit, it looks particularly attractive when colonizing a shady site (both moist and dry). A selection by Bob and Lisa Head of GardenDebut.com.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Everglow’ Japanese Grass Sedge is a new introduction in the EverColor® series from Irish hybridizer Pat Fitzgerald. ‘Everglow’ is a morrowii selection, but unlike Carex ‘Ice Dance’, this sedge has multicolored, fine evergreen blades with stripes of green, white and soft orange. The orange color intensifies in cooler fall temperatures, so Carex ‘Everglow’ is a great choice for winter containers. Like its siblings, ‘Everglow’ is a clumper.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 6

    'Ice Dance' Japanese Grass Sedge has green and white striped foliage. 'Ice Dance' is a great evergreen groundcover that can cover a large, shady area rapidly and easily. 'Ice Dance' spreads slowly to fill in and unlike other sedges, does not form clumps.  The small flowers appear above the foliage in May.  Native to Japan and introduced to the US by Barry Yinger.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Everillo' Weeping Sedge starts the summer season with lime green mounding foliage that rapidly turns a vivid yellowish gold. Like its relatives, 'Evergold', and 'Everest', 'Everillo' is evergreen, so it lights up the garden throughout the year. Carex 'Everillo' was found by Pat Fitzgerald of Ireland, as a naturally occurring sport of 'Evergold'. The graceful, flowing habit of the narrow leaves makes this sedge an excellent addition to mixed containers.

    PRN Preferred: Bright gold evergreen foliage lights up the garden all season long.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 6

    'Everest' ('CarFit01') Weeping Sedge is a lovely sport of Carex 'Evergold', with ivory white margins bordering the dark green evergreen leaves.  The soft flowing foliage does well in woodland settings and in mixed shade containers, as its bright white stripes make a showy display.  The habit is clumping.  Found in 2006 by Pat Fitzgerald of Ireland.

    Height: 10 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Evergold' Golden Sedge has yellow and green striped evergreen foliage. It is stunning as a container plant. This sedge looks good virtually year-round, and Bruce Crawford of the Rutgers Gardens has found that it is tolerant of full sun and poor soils as well. Wow!  This species is native to dry woods and rocky slopes throughout Honshu Island, Japan.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Pennsylvania Sedge has fine green leaves which are semi-evergreen, spreading slowly by rhizomes to form a tough groundcover in shady areas.  Plants are monoecious, male flowers appear in spiklets above the female flowers.   Most effective if planted in mass. It can be used instead of grass in the shade. Tolerant of foot traffic as well; mow infrequently.  Carex pensylvanica is native to thickets and dry woodland areas in North America providing nesting material and shelter for wild birds.  Pennsylvania Sedge supports dozens of butterfly and moth species.

    PRN Preferred: Makes a really good grass substitute for shady locations.

    Height: 8 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Seersucker Sedge lives up to its common name with its wide green leaves that are "puckered like Christmas ribbon", as those articulate folks at North Creek Nurseries say.  Carex plantaginea is native to eastern North America.  It tolerates moist locations and adds winter interest because this Carex is evergreen.  Plants slowly colonize from short rhizomes and by producing occasional seedlings.  The seeds are a food source for woodland birds including wild turkey.  It’s very quick to establish in rain gardens and on wooded slopes.

    PRN Preferred:  We love the unique, seersucker texture of the foliage and the purplish inflorescences.

    Height: 10 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Low Woodland Sedge is a rhizomatous Carex which produces long narrow arching green leaves. The semi-evergreen foliage is soft and flowing, looking like a green wave in woodland locations. Carex socialis thrives in wet sites and makes an attractive setting for taller flowering shade perennials. ‘Carex King’ James Brown of New Moon Nursery points out that it “looks like Nasella but likes moist soil and part shade.” Bruce Crawford says “it’s like hair on the face of the forest.”

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Prairie Fire' Orange New Zealand Sedge has thin upright long green blades in summer that take on shades of bronze, orange and red in fall and winter. Evergreen and of striking winter interest. Do not cut back old foliage until May or later. Good drainage is critical for this plant.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 7

    One of the most common and widespread sedge species in North America, Carex vulpinoidea, known commonly as Fox Sedge for its bushy fox-tail-like inflorescences, is a native obligate wetland species that can often be found along moist streambanks, pond edges, and low-lying meadows. Fox Sedge is a wonderful naturalizer, and is a prime groundcover candidate for wetland restoration and bioremediation projects. Narrow, finely textured blades can reach lengths of 1-3’, often cascading over and creating a windswept visual when planted in large swaths. Carex vulpinoidea is a host plant for various Skipper butterfly species, and the long, thin blades also create a protective shelter and habitat for songbirds, small mammals, and insects.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 3

    European Hornbeam has been used often and very effectively as a tightly pruned hedge or screen in formal settings in Europe, and this application is being used increasingly here in the US. Carpinus betulus is a tough, fine twigged tree which takes pruning very well and tolerates a wide variety of soil conditions. We are growing it as a low branched shrub for hedging and screening. Examples of this use can be found at Brooklyn Botanical Garden and also on Eastern Long Island.

    Height: 40 Feet
    Spread: 30 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Emerald Avenue® (‘JFS-KWICB’) European Hornbeam is another great tree from Keith Warren’s tireless work at J Frank Schmidt and Son Nursery. Carpinus betulus Emerald Avenue® has a tight habit of ascending branches around a strong central leader. The dark green leaves are small and disease-free in summer, making this a good choice for street plantings. The fall color is an attractive yellow. Emerald Avenue® tolerates a wide range of soil conditions.

    Height: 40 Feet
    Spread: 28 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Fastigate European Hornbeam is an excellent tree for urban or formal sites because of its tight, extremely regular form and excellent disease resistance. When young, Carpinus betulus 'Fastigiata' is narrow and very upright, but it broadens into a dense tight pyramidal oval as it matures. The leaves are neat and relatively small, and since the form never needs pruning, Carpinus is a maintenance-free tree. Even without foliage, the dense branching makes this an excellent screening tree in winter.

    Height: 40 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Frans Fontaine' European Hornbeam is more columnar than Carpinus betulus 'Fastigiata', but is equally resilient in urban and suburban conditions.  The narrower habit makes Carpinus 'Frans Fontaine' a good candidate for narrower spaces or street tree applications.  The fall color of the tidy foliage is a clear yellow, and winter interest is provided by the upright, densely branched form.  Since all Carpinus varieties are a fall digging hazard, container production makes the planting season much longer.

    Height: 40 Feet
    Spread: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5

    American Hornbeam is a tough, beautiful native tree which performs well in a wide variety of site conditions. Its green veined leaves and habit look somewhat like American Beech trees, and its interesting 2" hanging winged seed bracts add to its appeal in summer. It performs very well when transplanted from containers, and can be used in full sun or shade locations as well as sites which are periodically flooded.  Native to the US, Carpinus caroliniana can handle full shade and is often found as an understory plant in forests and along rivers.  The fall color is attractive, varying from yellow through orange to reddish purple hues. It can be pruned to make a good tight hedge, like its European cousin, C. betulus. 2020 PHS Gold Medal Plant!

    Height: 35 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 3

    Rising Fire® (‘Uxbridge’) American Hornbeam originated in Ontario and was introduced by J Frank Schmidt and Sons. Carpinus Rising Fire® has all the great attributes of Carpinus caroliniana, but the habit is columnar and tight. Its neat green summer leaves take on shades of orange and red in fall, and its 2” hanging seed bracts provide food for wildlife in the fall and winter. American Hornbeam is a very adaptable tree which will thrive in both woodland and urban sites.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Beyond Midnight® Bluebeard ('CT-9-12') produces abundant deep cobalt blue flowers in late summer to early fall.  The foliage is lustrous and disease resistant, growing on a compact habit.  Caryopteris Proven Winners® Color Choice® Beyond Midnight® need excellent drainage to thrive, and should not be cut back until spring.  The foliage has an attractive minty fragrance, which may be why deer and rabbits leave it alone.  A good plant for full sun containers.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Dark Knight' Bluebeard has deep blue-purple flowers in mid summer and grayish green aromatic foliage. It has consistently shown good disease resistance.   Clandonensis hybrids were discovered as an accidental cross between C. incana and C. mongholica. The flowers are very attractive to butterflies, bees and other beneficial insects.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Longwood Blue' Bluebeard has bluish violet flowers and grayish green aromatic foliage. 'Longwood Blue' blooms later than other Caryopteris, in mid to late summer. Dry site tolerant, crowns may rot in wet, poorly-drained soilsA selection from Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    New Jersey Tea is a tough, adaptable native shrub with pretty white fluffy lilac-shaped flowers in June and July. The flowers have a lovely delicate fragrance.  The fruits of Ceanothus americanus are subtle but interesting 3-sided capsules and the seeds are consumed by turkeys and quail.  It does very well in seashore settings and dry sites.  The name New Jersey Tea was coined during the American Revolution because its leaves were used as a substitute for imported tea.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Prairie Sentinel® (‘JFS-KSU1’) Common Hackberry is a member of the Elm family which has excellent tolerance of all kinds of soil conditions and temperature challenges. Prairie Sentinel® was found in Kansas by Kansas State University and introduced by J. Frank Schmidt Nursery of Oregon. It was selected for its tightly columnar habit, which makes it an excellent street tree option. The green coarse foliage is disease free, and the operative word to use about Celtis Prairie Sentinel® is “tough”, according to Dr. Michael Dirr.

    Height: 45 Feet
    Spread: 12 Feet
    Zone: 3

    Fringed, thistle-like flowers emerge from scaled buds above silvery gray foliage from May to July, attracting bees and butterflies to the cottage garden or mixed border. Centaurea montana ‘Amethyst Dream’ is a showy, herbaceous perennial that offers striking contrast between the shaggy, royal purple blooms and the soft gray foliage that make great additions to containers and cut flower arrangements. Spent flowers can be deadheaded to prolong bloom period. An introduction by Blooms of Bressingham, and a ‘RHS Plants for Pollinators’ selection by the Royal Horticultural Society.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Centaurea montana ‘Amethyst in Snow’ is a very cold hardy perennial known by many common names: Bachelor’s Button, Mountain Bluet, Mountain Cornflower, and Knapweed, to name a few. ‘Amethyst in Snow’ Bachelor’s Button features bi-colored flowers with white outer petals and purple-indigo centers that appear first between mid-May and early June and will often rebloom sporadically throughout summer and into the fall when the weather begins to cool. This showy mountain-dweller’s white-and-purple blooms have given this plant notoriety as the first two-toned Centaurea montana introduced and marketed to the green industry. It has also been revered for its vigorous, outward-growth habit that is capable of naturalizing in a small, spready mound of soft, silvery-green foliage and flamboyant white-and-purple blooms over time, and will perform well even under poor, dry soil conditions.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    The rosy red flower spikes of Red Valerian bloom for an extended period in early to mid-summer. This plant prefers sterile, limey soils and does well in rock gardens and walls.  Freely self-seeds in optimum growing conditions, to prevent self-seeding and to encourage additional bloom, remove spent flower stems.  Centranthus ruber var. coccineus is more compact in size and has darker red flowers than the straight species.  An old-fashioned, easy perennial. 

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Sugar Shack® ('SMCOSS') Buttonbush is a more compact version of our interesting native Cephalanthus.  The white puffball flowers appear in mid to late summer, attracting butterflies and other pollinators.  The blooms are followed by red mace shaped fruit and burgundy foliage in the fall, providing food for wildlife as well as visual interest.  Buttonbush is a host plant for titan sphinx moths and hydrangea sphinx moth caterpillars.  Cephalanthus is very wet site tolerant (we first saw it while canoeing as little children), so it is an excellent bog, bioswale or rain garden shrub.  2024 PHS Gold Medal Plant.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Cephalotaxus harringtonia 'Duke Gardens' has dark evergreen foliage and a tight, compact form. 'Duke Gardens' Plum Yew is excellent in shade but will tolerate sun as well. Originally found at The Sarah P. Duke Gardens  in North Carolina by Richard Fillmore in the late 1950s, as a branch sport of C. 'Fastigiata'.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Cephalotaxus harringtonia 'Fastigiata' has evergreen foliage and a wide columnar habit. It makes a good pillar-like conifer for foundation and formal plantings. Easily pruned and maintained as columnar specimens.  Fastigiate Plum Yew is a slow growing alternative to upright Taxus in deer country.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Cephalotaxus harringtonia 'Prostrata' has dark evergreen foliage and looks like Taxus baccata 'Repandens' on steroids. Its long shoots can  gracefully cascade over stone walls.  Prostrate Plum Yew loves shady, dry locations. Best substitute for low growing Taxus in deer situations.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Ceratostigma plumbaginoides is a Leadwort or Plumbago native to the foothills of China with cobalt blue flowers from late summer till frost.  Flowers resemble those of woodland phlox.  This plant spreads by underground rhizomes and slowly expands to form an effective groundcover.  The green foliage turns a reddish purple in the fall. The new foliage appears late in the spring.  Per NC State Extension "It produces chemicals that inhibit the growth of weeds and other unwanted plants, which makes it an excellent choice as a ground cover. "  Ceratostigma is attractive to pollinators, especially the hawk moth.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Cercis canadensis is a classic harbinger of spring, with pinkish lavender pea-shaped flowers covering its branches in April ("cauliflory"). The green heart-shaped leaves of this Eastern Redbud turn yellow in the fall, and the zigzag branching habit in the winter adds to the appeal of this large shrub or small tree.  Per Dr. Michael Dirr "A native tree with a touch of class."  The flowers are actually edible, so they make an attractive addition to spring salads.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Ace of Hearts' Eastern Redbud is a long-awaited dwarf form of Cercis canadensis with magenta pink flowers in April and May.  More shrub-like, typically half the size of the straight species.  The form is similar to the ace in a deck of cards.  It was found and introduced by Paul Woody of Morganton, North Carolina. 

    Height: 12 Feet
    Spread: 10 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Alley Cat' Eastern Redbud has foliage liberally splashed with white, and its striking variegation is stable and scorch resistant.  The dark pink pea-shaped flowers emerge in April just before the leaves begin to show in shades of copper pink and soft green.  As the foliage matures, the white emerges and makes a lovely contrast to the green.  Alan Bush found Cercis 'Alley Cat' in an alley near his home in Kentucky, and gave it to Harald Neubauer of Hidden Hollow Nursery to introduce.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Appalachia' Red Eastern Redbud has deep reddish purple buds that open to bright neon pink flowers in April and May. Cercis canadensis 'Appalachia' is more vibrant than the straight species and very eye-catching.  It was found growing along a roadside in Maryland by Dr. Max Byrkit.  2021 PHS Gold Medal Plant.

    PRN Preferred: The bloom color is more brilliance than others in this genus.  Very striking.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Burgundy Hearts® ('Greswan') Eastern Redbud is a refinement of the 'Forest Pansy' theme, with pinkish lavender April flowers followed by reddish purple lustrous foliage. The heart-shaped leaves hold their dark color longer in the summer, taking on reddish wine tones towards the fall. Introduced by Greenleaf Nurseries from a selection of over 3,000 seedlings.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Carolina Sweetheart® ('NCCC1') Eastern Redbud is an unusual new Cercis, from NCSU in partnership with the North Carolina nurserymen.  The heart-shaped leaves emerge in April, in shades of bronzy purple with vivid pink and white margins.  The tri-color effect is striking, and since it follows the classic lavender purple flower display, Cercis Carolina Sweetheart® is a dramatic standout in the landscape for a long period.  By mid summer the foliage is primarily bronze green, but the new growth continues to be colorful.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Flame Thrower® (‘NC2016-2’) Eastern Redbud came from JC Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh, NC. They’re onto something new and different, as the leaves emerge reddish burgundy and rapidly mature to yellow and green, giving a multicolor effect. The pink pea-shaped blooms appear on the bare stems before the foliage emerges. A really striking small specimen tree, especially in late spring and early summer.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Forest Pansy' Eastern Redbud has rose purple flowers and reddish purple foliage in April and May changing to bronze by fall. The foliage is strikingly beautiful in spring and early summer.  Originally found in a seedling block at Forest Nursery in McMinnville, TN in 1947.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 18 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Golden Falls® (‘NC2015-12’) Eastern Redbud is an introduction from the JC Raulston Arboretum. The large heart-shaped leaves appear in spring in shades of chartreuse and yellow. They follow the display of pink pea-shaped flowers which cover the weeping branches. Cercis canadensis Golden Falls® tolerates summer sun without scorching as much as other yellow Cercis do, so the foliage is showy all summer. The strong weeping habit makes Golden Falls® a good candidate for tight locations.

    Height: 12 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5
    'Hearts of Gold' Eastern Redbud, is a new selection from Jon Roethling with bright yellow new growth all summer, (the older leaves turn green). The flowers of 'Hearts of Gold' are lavender and appear in April and May. It keeps its color best in cooler climates.
    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 18 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Lavender Twist™ ('Covey') Eastern Redbud has purplish rose flowers in April and May on an umbrella-shaped crown. Lavender Twist™ is a great introduction from Tim Brotsman, found by him in New York State in the garden of Mrs. Covey.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Royal White' Eastern Redbud is a classic white flowering Cercis which was selected by the late great Dr. JC McDaniel of the University of Illinois. He chose it for the large, plentiful pea-shaped flowers produced abundantly in April. Since the parent tree was found in Bluffs, Illinois, the cold tolerance is excellent. 'Royal White' is vigorous and faster growing than other white forms, and we're glad to be able to keep this tried-and-true selection in circulation.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Ruby Falls' Redbud is a weeping form of 'Forest Pansy', long awaited by avid plantsmen and brought to us by Dr. Dennis Werner of NCSU. The velvety purple foliage is displayed on graceful weeping branches, making a spectacular show in spring and early summer before it ages to greenish bronze. Its rosy purple flowers emerge before the leaves unfold. The name was chosen by 5 year old Porter Neubauer of Tennessee, undoubtedly a great future nurseryman.

    PRN Preferred: A great combination of habit (weeping) with color (deep velvety purple).

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Summer's Tower™ ('JN7') Eastern Redbud was found by Ray Jackson of Belvidere, Tennessee as a chance seedling on his nursery.  The habit is upright rather than broad, so its vase-shaped form works well in confined spaces.  The lavender pink pea-shaped flowers cover 'Summer's Tower' in April and May, when the green heart-shaped leaves are first emerging.  The upright shape in maturity is almost reminiscent of Zelkova 'Mushashino', but Cercis 'Summer's Tower' is of course much smaller at maturity.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 5

    The Rising Sun™ ('JN2') Redbud is one of the most stunning plants we have ever seen, with foliage that starts as peachy apricot, maturing through chartreuse-yellow to a final deep green. Since all three color phases are present at the same time in late spring and summer, the effect is spectacular. The blooms are the classic Redbud lavender in April and May.  It was found and introduced by Ray Jackson of Belvidere, Tennessee.

    Height: 15 Feet
    Spread: 12 Feet
    Zone: 5

    The stems of White Chinese Redbud are covered in white flowers in April, followed by attractive heart-shaped leaves. Cercis chinensis 'Alba' ('Shirobana') is a hard-to-find Chinese Redbud.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Cercis chinensis 'Don Egolf' has branches that are absolutely covered with pinkish lavender flowers in April, followed by heart-shaped neat glossy foliage.  'Don Egolf' does not bear seed pods like the other cultivars, which makes it a very sought after cultivar.  Due to is compact size and slower growth rate it is very suitable for containers. 'Don Egolf' Chinese Redbud is a wonderful plant named after one of the world's greatest plantsmen, Dr. Don Egolf, who is much missed in the plant world.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Kay's Early Hope' Chinese Redbud was named after NC State's wonderful Women's Basketball Coach Kay Yow, because its pinkish lavender flowers appear at the same time as NC State's basketball tournaments.  Upright and vase-shaped in habit, 'Kay's Early Hope' is covered with blooms for a longer period than most Cercis chinensis cultivars.  It was introduced by the JC Raulston Arboretum from a plant grown in their extensive collection for many years.

    Height: 15 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Oklahoma' Redbud has rosy magenta flowers in April and May, followed by leathery green heart-shaped leaves.  Coming originally from Oklahoma and Texas, it shows better heat and wind tolerance than other Cercis.  Warren and Son Nursery first found this tough plant in the mountains of Oklahoma, which may explain its greater hardiness than other texensis varieties of Redbud.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 18 Feet
    Zone: 6
    'Merlot' Redbud is a very exciting cross of 'Forest Pansy' and texensis 'Texas White', made by Dr. Dennis Werner of NCSU (he is clearly a very busy plantsman). The texensis genes enable Cercis x 'Merlot' to resist heat better, resulting in more lustrous, deeper purple foliage. The rose-purple flowers appear in April and May; finishing just as the leaves are emerging.
    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 18 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Pink Pom Poms' Redbud is another beautiful introduction from the work of Dr Dennis Werner of NCSU and Alex Neubauer of Hidden Hollow Nursery.  The double flowered Cercis c. 'Flame' was crossed with Cercis r. Oklahoma, resulting in much bigger, showier double dark pink to purple flowers.  When in  bloom in April and May, 'Pink Pom Poms' is absolutely breath taking, and the huge flower display is not followed by seedpods because the blooms are completely sterile.  The green heart-shaped leaves appear after the blooms, and are glossy and attractive.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 5

    The Double Take® Orange Floweringquince series comes from the work of Dr. Tom Ranney of NCSU's Mountain Research Station in Ashville, N.C. It has very large bright orange double flowers on compact thornless plants. The blooms appear in April for an extended period, with some sporadic reblooming in summer.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Double Take® Pink Floweringquince is another beauty from Dr. Tom Ranney, with very large double deep pink flowers in April. The blooms resemble Camellias in their size and color intensity. The compact plants are thornless, and their branches make lovely cut flowers to bring inside in early spring.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Double Take® Scarlet Floweringquince is the third release from Dr. Tom Ranney's team in Ashville, NC, with very large dark red double flowers. The thornless plants bloom for an extended time in April, sporadically reblooming in summer.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Northern Sea Oats has showy oat-like seedheads in August over green foliage. An excellent choice for planting under the light shade of tall trees and especially showy when planted in mass.  Great for dried grass arrangements.  Chasmanthium latifolium is a larval host to caterpillars of Northern Pearly Eye Butterfly and several species of Skippers.  In addition, birds and woodland animals love the seeds especially in winter. It seeds itself readily so site correctly or deadhead seed pods before they ripen.  

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Our native Turtlehead is a wonderful plant for wet sites and rain gardens. In late summer Chelone glabra produces tall spikes of white flowers which are thought to look like the heads of turtles (use your imagination).  The upper lip serves as a protective hood and the lower lip is a landing strip for pollinators.   Best grown in part shade but survives well in full sun given enough moisture.  The green foliage is clean and disease-resistant. Butterflies love its flowers, especially the Baltimore Checkerspot Butterfly.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Black Ace’ Turtlehead does extremely well in moist and wet locations, as it is usually found in swampy sites. The white flower spikes look like clusters of snapdragons, carried on dark green to blackish stems and leaves. The blooms appear in mid to late summer, and are an important nectar source for butterflies and other pollinators. Since Chelone glabra ‘Black Ace’ spreads by stolons, it eventually makes a large clump and can be used to stabilize pond and stream edges. Selected by Craig Moretz.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Hot Lips' Turtlehead has clear pink flowers in July, shiny green foliage, and is wet site tolerant. It spreads slowly to make a large patch eventually, so it can be used as a tall groundcover.  Chelone lyonii 'Hot Lips' differs from the straight species because it has darker green foliage, red stems and stronger pink flowers.  This is a wonderful introduction selected by Native Plant guru Dale Hendricks, which he named after a co-worker as a nickname.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Tiny Toruga' ('Armtipp02') Turtlehead is a compact descendant of 'Hot Lips', with the same deep pink flowers which resemble Snapdragon buds.  The leaves emerge in the spring in shades of bronze and turn to deep green as the flowers emerge in July and August.  Chelone 'Tiny Tortuga' colonizes slowly and loves moist to wet areas.  If you studied Spanish in school, you'll recognize 'Tortuga' as 'Turtle', and get the name pun.

    PRN Preferred:  All the great attributes of "Hot Lips" but a more compact form.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4
    Chionanthus retusus 'Tokyo Tower' becomes covered with white panicles in May and June. This Chinese Fringetree is a shiny leaved fastigiate form, with beautiful tan and gold exfoliating bark. Harald Neubauer of Hidden Hollow Nursery in Tennessee brought it back from Japan, under the original name of 'Ivory Tower'.
    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    White Fringetree has intensely fragrant, fluffy white panicle flowers in May, followed by bird attracting bluish purple fruit if plant is female (dioecious). Although fruit only appears on the female plants, the flowers on the male plants are showier due to their longer petals.  The foliage hosts many butterfly and moth caterpillars, including several sphinxes.  Fall color ranges from a yellowish green to to a bright golden yellow.  Chionanthus virginicus is also wet site tolerant.

    Height: 15 Feet
    Spread: 10 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Spring Fleecing' White Fringetree has fragrant white flowers in large fluffy panicles on an upright plant with dark green narrow leaves. Male, so it blooms consistently and heavily every year.  Chionanthus virginicus 'Spring Fleecing' is a selection by Sam Allen of Tarheel Native Trees. It is also wet site tolerant.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 10 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Hillside Sheffield Pink' Hardy Mum flowers have apricot to shell pink petals with yellow centers and bloom for an extended period in late summer and early fall over aromatic foliage. This tough perennial has been re-introduced by Fred McGourty of Hillside Gardens. The clumps will get bigger every year and works as an effective groundcover and weed suppressor. One of the last hurrahs of the northern garden. 

    PRN Preferred:  Tons of blooms on a very late blooming perennial. 

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Chrysanthemum Mammoth™ ‘Coral Daisy’ is a Hardy Mum variety that produces large, semi-double, coral-colored flowers with bright yellow centers consistently throughout the fall, from August to November. A member of the Mammoth™ series, no pinching or pruning is required to ensure a long bloom season, and its tall mounding habit makes this Mum is a great addition as the seasonal backdrop to smaller fall-blooming species. Aromatic, dark green foliage tends to deter deer. Best when planted in spring so that root production can establish prior to winter. The Mammoth™ series was previously published under My Favorite™ and Maxi-Mums, all cultivated as shrub cushion growth habit varieties by the University of Minnesota – so you know they are cold hardy!

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Chrysanthemum Mammoth™ ‘Dark Bronze Daisy’ is a Hardy Mum variety that produces dense displays of daisy-like flowers with bright yellow centers surrounded by petals of rich, autumnal hues consistently throughout the fall, from August to November. A member of the Mammoth™ series, no pinching or pruning is required to ensure a long bloom season, and its tall mounding habit makes this Mum is a great addition as the seasonal backdrop to smaller fall-blooming species. Aromatic, dark green foliage tends to deter deer. Best when planted in spring so that root production can establish prior to winter. The Mammoth™ series was previously published under My Favorite™ and Maxi-Mums, all cultivated as shrub cushion growth habit varieties by the University of Minnesota – so you know they are cold hardy!

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 3

    A fall favorite of butterflies, Chrysanthemum Mammoth™ ‘Lavender Daisy’ is a Hardy Mum variety that produces large, semi-double pinkish lavender flowers from August to November. A member of the Mammoth™ series, no pinching or pruning is required to ensure a long bloom season, and its tall mounding habit makes this Mum is a great addition as the seasonal backdrop to smaller fall-blooming species. Aromatic, dark green foliage tends to deter deer. Best when planted in spring so that root production can establish prior to winter. The Mammoth™ series was previously published under My Favorite™ and Maxi-Mums, all cultivated as shrub cushion growth habit varieties by the University of Minnesota – so you know they are cold hardy!

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 3

    A prolific fall bloomer, Chrysanthemum Mammoth™ ‘Red Daisy’ is a Hardy Mum variety that produces large, deep red, semi-double flowers from August to November. A member of the Mammoth™ series, no pinching or pruning is required to ensure a long bloom season, and its tall mounding habit makes this Mum is a great addition as the seasonal backdrop to smaller fall-blooming species. Aromatic, dark green foliage tends to deter deer. Best when planted in spring so that root production can establish prior to winter. The Mammoth™ series was previously published under My Favorite™ and Maxi-Mums, all cultivated as shrub cushion growth habit varieties by the University of Minnesota – so you know they are cold hardy!

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Mammoth™ ‘Yellow Quill’ Hardy Mum comes from the hybridizing work of the University of Minnesota, so you know it’s really cold tolerant. The long yellow petals are quilled with spoon-shaped tips. The growth habit of Chrysanthemum Mammoth™ ‘Yellow Quill’ is mounding with clean green foliage all summer, topped with the large yellow daisies all fall.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 48 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Rustic Glow' Hardy Mum is one of the Global Warning Mum™ introductions.  Like the other excellent Sinclair Adam Jr hybrid Chrysanthemums, it blooms in mid to late fall, adding not only vivid color to the garden, but also much needed food for pollinators.  The daisy-like flowers are bright orange yellow, with multiple blooms per stem.  The foliage is a clean green all summer, and the patch grows wider over time.  We were introduced to this delicate beauty by our friend Nora Sirbaugh, a great and passionate NJ gardener.

    Height: 20 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Superstar' Golden Star makes a lovely delicate green carpet in shady and sunny locations. The slightly fuzzy green foliage is studded with lots of bright yellow simple flowers in mid to late spring, with some reblooming when moisture is adequate. Originally named after the American Rock Garden Society's Norman Singer, this native groundcover is both deer resistant and very easy to grow. 'Superstar' was renamed to reflect the fact that the foliage is significantly cleaner and more vigorous, remaining attractive long after the vivid flower display finishes. James Brown, the Carex King of New Moon Nursery, says it's his favorite Chrysogonum.

    Height: 5 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    American Yellowwood is a beautiful native tree that should be used in more landscapes. The flowers are very fragrant, with lovely white pea-shaped flowers appearing in May and June on long pendulous panicles. They provide excellent food for bees and other insects, and they resemble a more refined Wisteria flower. The foliage emerges in spring as a chartreuse green during the summer, finishing up as a bright yellow in fall. The bark is an attractive grayish brown, very smooth textured and closely resembling Beech bark. Cladrastis kentukea tolerates both acidic and alkaline soils, and prefers adequate moisture.

    Height: 40 Feet
    Spread: 40 Feet
    Zone: 4

    We are often asked questions about pruning Clematis, and cultivars are often divided into groupings (1, 2 and 3) which are guides for optimal pruning.  Based on our own experience at Pleasant Run Nursery (and to simplify things), we have designated our Clematis into Group A and Group B.  

    Group A:  Cultivars which benefit from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    Group B:  Species and Cultivars which tend to be more vigorous growers.  They preform best with a yearly hard pruning in late winter or early spring.  Always remove dead stems, and cut the Group B plants back to 1' to 2'. 

    Avant-Garde™ ('Evipo 033') Clematis comes from the Evison/Poulson hybridizing program. The 3" flowers are a showy combination of red surrounding pink petaloid stamens, making the blooms look almost double. The bloom period is July to September. Since Avant-Garde™ is a heavy bloomer, the show is very eye catching.

    Group B:  Species and Cultivars which tend to be more vigorous growers.  They preform best with a yearly hard pruning in late winter or early spring.  Always remove dead stems, and cut the Group B plants back to 1' to 2'. 

    Height: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Bourbon™ ('Evipo 018'(N)) Clematis is another exciting introduction from the Evison/Poulson breeding program.  The large (5") flowers are a bright red, set off by bright yellow anthers.  Although shorter than many Clematis, the flower display is impressive.  Bourbon™ blooms June to August and would make an interesting addition to large mixed containers.

    Group A:  Benefits from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Duchess of Edinburgh' Clematis is a very showy vine, with quantities of double white flowers in May and June. Blooms are large and long lasting.

    Group A:  Benefits from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'General Sikorski' Clematis is a vigorous climbing vine with large lavender blue flowers set off by soft yellow stamens.  Clematis 'General Sikorski' starts blooming in late spring and continues throughout June.  Like a number of other Clematis, 'General Sikorski' will often rebloom in late summer and early fall.  This vigorous vine needs something to cling to, so plant it with a trellis or beside a shrub which it can grow up through. 

    Group A:  Benefits from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5
    Clematis 'Gillian Blades' has large white flowers that have ruffled edges and yellow anthers. Starts blooming in May and June, reblooming intermittently through the summer.
    Height: 12 Feet
    Zone: 5

    The rich pink ruffled flowers of Clematis 'Hagley Hybrid' bloom from June to July. The blooms are large and very showy.

    Group A:  Benefits from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Clematis 'Henryi' has large white flowers with brown anthers. Blooms June to August.  We love this Clematis for the brilliant whiteness of its flower.

    Group A:  Benefits from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    Height: 15 Feet
    Zone: 5

    The large velvet purple flowers of Clematis 'Jackmanii Superba' bloom in June to September and will rebloom dependably. The classic large purple Clematis.

    Group A:  Benefits from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Clematis 'Multi-Blue' has large dark blue to purple flowers which are double, made even showier by the frilly white tipped stamenoids. Blooms for an extended time starting in June and the flowers persist longer because they're double and therefore sterile.

    Group A:  Benefits from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    PRN Preferred:  Large long blooming flowers.  Once the petals fall the anthers remain for added interest.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5

    The bicolor pink flowers of Clematis 'Nelly Moser' have a darker pink stripe on each petal. Blooms May to June and again in September. Blooms are large and striking.

    Group A:  Benefits from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Clematis 'Niobe' has large magenta flowers with yellow anthers. Blooms May to June and again in September. The color makes the flower look velvety.

    Group A:  Benefits from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Nubia™ (‘Evipo079’) Clematis is a beautiful introduction from Raymond Evision. The large flowers are a deep crimson red, on a somewhat compact vine. Clematis Nubia™ is part of the Boulevard® series, and performs well on trellises and fences. A very cool use for Clematis is in combination with shrubs, where the plants can support the vine and display the flowers. Nubia™ should be pruned in late winter or early spring.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Clematis 'Ramona' has large lavender blue flowers with dark anthers. Blooms June to August. This is one of our favorite blue Clematis.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Clematis 'Rhapsody' has large sapphire blue flowers set off by yellow anthers. Blooms July to August. We have been very impressed with the flower color and length of bloom time.

    Group A:  Benefits from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Zone: 5

    The deep blue bell-like flowers of Clematis 'Rooguchi' have lighter, upward-curving interiors. A scrambler, not a climber (needs to be fastened to support). Blooms June to September, and one of our favorite vines.

    Group B:  Species and Cultivars which tend to be more vigorous growers.  They preform best with a yearly hard pruning in late winter or early spring.  Always remove dead stems, and cut the Group B plants back to 1' to 2'. 

    Height: 6 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Sapphire Indigo™ Clematis ('Cleminov 51') is a short non-clinging vine with gorgeous purple-blue flowers in June and July.  It can be used as a loose open groundcover, but it works even better if allowed to twine up through small shrubs and sturdy perennials.  The 4" blooms open as an open-faced purple and mature to a beautiful sapphire blue.  Hybridized by INRA in France and introduced into the US by Conard Pyle Nurseries.

    Group B:  Species and Cultivars which tend to be more vigorous growers.  They preform best with a yearly hard pruning in late winter or early spring.  Always remove dead stems, and cut the Group B plants back to 1' to 2'. 

    PRN Preferred:  A long blooming sprawler, excellent when used in mixed borders.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Clematis 'The President' has large deep purple flowers. Blooms from June to September. A dependable rebloomer, and a striking vine to run up through shrubs and small trees.

    Group A:  Benefits from a light pruning in late winter or early spring, followed by a light pruning after the summer bloom period.  The second pruning encourages the large flowered cultivars to rebloom in late summer.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Clematis durandii has deep blue flowers of 4 petals with creamy, showy anthers, on a non-clinging, scrambling vine. Blooms July and August. Unusual and very striking.

    Group B:  Species and Cultivars which tend to be more vigorous growers.  They preform best with a yearly hard pruning in late winter or early spring.  Always remove dead stems, and cut the Group B plants back to 1' to 2'. 

    Height: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Golden Clematis has yellow pendant flowers in June through August produced on a vigorous climbing vine.  The bell-shaped flowers of 4 petals appear for an extended period, followed by attractive silky seedheads.  Although Clematis tangutica has been in the US since the late 1800s, it is not easily found in commerce.  If not run up a trellis, Clematis tangutica can also be used as a rather rampant groundcover.

    Height: 12 Feet
    Zone: 5

    The white fragrant flowers of Sweet Autumn Clematis are prolific. This Clematis grows very rapidly to a large size. Blooms September and October, with small star-like white flowers.

    Height: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Princess Diana' Scarlet Clematis has beautiful tulip-shaped flowers in June and July, with fairly consistent reblooming in early fall. The up-facing blooms are soft pink on the outsides and dark-rose pink on the insides, making a lovely two-toned effect. The habit is scrambling, and needs some support.

    Group B:  Species and Cultivars which tend to be more vigorous growers.  They preform best with a yearly hard pruning in late winter or early spring.  Always remove dead stems, and cut the Group B plants back to 1' to 2'. 

    PRN Preferred:  Unique tulip-shaped deep pink flowers followed by silky seed heads.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Duchess of Albany' Scarlet Clematis has clear pink bell shaped flower which have a deep rose bar in the centers of petals for a lovely bi-colored effect. Blooms prolifically starting in July through September. Shows more heat tolerance than many Clematis.

    Group B:  Species and Cultivars which tend to be more vigorous growers.  They preform best with a yearly hard pruning in late winter or early spring.  Always remove dead stems, and cut the Group B plants back to 1' to 2'. 

    Height: 15 Feet
    Zone: 6

    North American native Clematis virginiana is a fragrant, autumn-blooming vine with a rapid growth habit. It typically occurs in woodlands, thickets, and other low-lying areas, and scrambles up other vertical plants or structures for support. Without support, this prolific grower will sprawl in a dense, tangled mat along the ground. Small, fragrant white flowers cover the vine from August to October, at which point fluffy seedheads will begin to display. Woodbine is known to be an aggressive self-seeder and can be quick to establish by suckers, making it a great selection for quickly covering trellises, vertical supports, or acting as a native groundcover in areas with moist, rich, well-drained soil. Flowers are attractive to pollinators including hummingbirds and the foliage is often used as nesting habitat for many songbirds.

    Height: 16 Feet
    Zone: 3

    The sky-blue bell-like flowers of 'Betty Corning' Italian Clematis bloom July to September. The habit is vigorous and it covers a trellis rapidly. All C. viticellas are highly resistant to Clematis wilt.

    Group B:  Species and Cultivars which tend to be more vigorous growers.  They preform best with a yearly hard pruning in late winter or early spring.  Always remove dead stems, and cut the Group B plants back to 1' to 2'. 

    Height: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Etoile Violette' Italian Clematis has multiple small deep purple flowers. Blooms heavily from July to September on a fast growing vine.

    Group B:  Species and Cultivars which tend to be more vigorous growers.  They preform best with a yearly hard pruning in late winter or early spring.  Always remove dead stems, and cut the Group B plants back to 1' to 2'. 

    Height: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Madame Julia Correvon' Italian Clematis blooms for a prolonged period from late June to September, producing a large quantity of 3" bright reddish wine flowers with yellow stamens. The viticella Clematis types flower on new growth, so they do well with a hard pruning in late winter to early spring. As a self-clinging vine, 'Madame Julia Correvon' does very well growing up trellises or winding up small trees or through large shrubs. The roots are happiest in cool shade and the tops prefer full sun.

    Group B:  Species and Cultivars which tend to be more vigorous growers.  They preform best with a yearly hard pruning in late winter or early spring.  Always remove dead stems, and cut the Group B plants back to 1' to 2'. 

    Height: 12 Feet
    Zone: 4

    The large violet flowers of 'Venosa Violacea' Italian Clematis have vivid white centers running down each petal, giving it a bi-color effect. Blooms July to September.

    Group B:  Species and Cultivars which tend to be more vigorous growers.  They preform best with a yearly hard pruning in late winter or early spring.  Always remove dead stems, and cut the Group B plants back to 1' to 2'. 

    Height: 15 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Tom's Compact' Summersweet is the most compact we have seen of the Summersweets. This fragrant white flowered beauty was found and introduced by a great nurseryman of our area, Tom Dilatush. We've been waiting a long time to get our hands on Clethra alnifolia 'Compacta' and to top it off, it is wet site and salt tolerant.  The tight branching structure provided excellent shelter for birds throughout the year.

    PRN Preferred:  Compact dense habit, never needs pruning.  Loved by pollinators.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Hummingbird' Summersweet has very fragrant white flowers that cover the plant in June and July. This selection is a compact form that is both wet site and salt tolerant. It spreads vigorously by rhizomes to form colonies.  The leaves are narrower than the species and the fall color is lovely shades of golden yellow.  Clethra alnifolia 'Hummingbird' is an introduction from Calloway Gardens, Pine Mountain, GA where it was planted along Humminbird Lake, hence the name.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Ruby Spice' Summersweet has very fragrant dark pink flowers in June and July. It is both wet site and salt tolerant. Clethra alnifolia 'Ruby Spice' was found by Andy Brand formerly of Broken Arrow Nursery in Connecticut.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Sherry Sue' Summersweet has very fragrant white flower spikes which are displayed on pinkish red new growth stems.  Clethra alnifolia 'Sherry Sue' blooms in July and August, providing nectar for a number of pollinators.  It is found naturally in boggy areas throughout the Northeast, and is particularly useful because of its deer resistance and suckering habit.  Introduced by the JC Raulston Arboretum in North Carolina.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Sixteen Candles' Summersweet has very fragrant white flowers in June and July.  It is both wet site and salt tolerant. Clethra alnifolia 'Sixteen Candles' was introduced by Dr. Michael Dirr and has an improved upright growth habit and is compact in size.  Per Michael Dirr "white flowers are held upright like candles on a birthday cake".

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Summer Sparkler, formerly Einstein® ('Novacleein') Summersweet blooms in July and August, producing 12" white flower spikes.  The blooms are fragrant and somewhat curly because of their unusual length.  Clethra alnifolia Summer Sparkler is a compact form of Summersweet, making a good deer resistant shrub groundcover.  Introduced by Star Roses in 2015.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Sweetfern is a small but widely suckering shrub that energetically colonizes dry, acidic, sterile areas. Hair catkins crown the ends of the stems in late April and early May.  Foliage is green and fragrant (it's in the Bayberry family), with a fern-like texture. It prefers more acid soil and is a nitrogen-fixing species.  The semi-evergreen leaves of Comptonia peregrina turn bronzy green in late fall.  It is an important host for butterfly and moth larvae, including several Sphinx moth species and the Gray Hairstreak butterfly.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 2

    Lily of the Valley has white extremely fragrant bell-like flowers in late April and May. Convallaria is a good groundcover for tough shady sites and a popular cut flower.  If planted in optimum growing conditions, it will spread rapidly by rhizomes to form dense colonies in the landscape so site appropriately.  Some orange fruit may appear in fall.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 2
    'Bordeaux' Lily of the Valley has white extremely fragrant flowers in May that are bigger than the species and are displayed more prominently above the foliage. Some production of orange berries in late summer and fall.
    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 2

    The semi-double yellow flowers of 'Early Sunrise' Tickseed have orange centers. Coreopsis grandiflora 'Early Sunrise' is a compact form that thrives in heat and sun.  It blooms for an extended period in June and July. Deadheading prolongs the flower display.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    A favorite native perennial of more than twenty bee species, Coreopsis lanceolata is as beloved by wildlife as it is by gardeners. Commonly, it’s known as Lanceleaf Coreopsis for its slender, slightly pubescent linear-elliptic foliage, large golden yellow flowers with brighter yellow ray petals and warmer orange interior disk petals. Flowers are borne on wiry, stiff stems from late June to early August. The delicate, fluffy seedheads are enjoyed by songbirds from late summer to the end of the growing season, and any remaining seeds easily intersperse themselves throughout the garden, making for a broad and cohesive display the following year. Its low maintenance attitude, ability to tolerate dry soils and periodic drought, and its prolific bloom period make Coreopsis lanceolata a lovely addition to the full sun perennial border, or to the naturalized pollinator garden. Lanceleaf Coreopsis is a host plant for the larvae of the Wavy-lined Emerald moth to boot.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Pink Threadleaf Tickseed produces pink daisy-like flowers all summer, especially when trimmed after the first bloom period. Coreopsis rosea tolerates a wide range of sites, from moist soils to dry and sandy sites. The yellow centers are a good source of food for pollinators and the seeds are consumed by songbirds in late summer. Coreopsis rosea forms a mat through rhizomes, and self-seeds well, so this is a good candidate for naturalizing.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Gold standard’ Tall Tickseed blooms in mid summer and is covered with bright yellow daisy-like flowers with black cones. This selection was introduced by the Mt. Cuba Center in 2015, when its performance topped their Coreopsis trials for habit, disease resistance and long bloom period. Per Timothy Tilghman at Untermyer Garden in Yonkers, NY, this cultivar is also less likely to flop.  Coreopsis ‘Gold Standard’ came from seed collected in Alabama, and was named by Mt. Cuba. Since ‘Gold Standard’ spreads by rhizomes, this very tall perennial performs well as a wild looking groundcover or as an addition to tall meadows.

    Height: 62 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Moonbeam' Threadleaf Tickseed has pale yellow flowers and is an excellent repeat bloomer. For best performance, deadhead after first flush of blooms. Great in rock gardens and gardens with poor soil.  1992 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Zagreb' Threadleaf Tickseed has gold flowers, an upright habit, and forms a large vigorous mat eventually. Blooms June to August, especially if deadheaded.  The cultivar originated in the Department of Ornamental Plants and Landscape Architecture at the University of Zagreb in Zagreb, Croatia.  2020 PHS Gold Medal Plant!

    PRN Preferred:  Very disease resistant foliage, does not flop.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Mercury Rising’ Tickseed is another exciting result of hybridizer Darrell Probst’s work, with wine red daisy like flowers on a cold-hardy plant. A cross between C. grandiflora and C. verticillata, ‘Mercury Rising’ blooms throughout the summer on a broad mounding habit. The yellow centers are particularly striking in the surrounding velvety petals. Deadheading after the first flush of flowers makes the rebloom showier.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    The deep yellow petals of 'Jethro Tull' Tickseed are fluted like little tubes, providing a long blooming summer show.  It is a hybrid cross of Coreopsis auriculata 'Zamfir' (female parent) and Coreopsis lanceolata 'Early Sunrise' (male parent). Another winner from the people who brought you the Big Sky™ series of Coneflowers.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Ivory Halo™ ('Bailhalo') Tatarian Dogwood has brightly variegated leaves that emerge in spring with green centers surrounded by large ivory white margins. The flat topped creamy flowers in May and June are followed by white summer fruit. The fall color is pink and reddish purple, and the winter stem color is dark red and showy. Prune out older canes in the spring to maintain the winter stem show.  An introduction from Bailey Nurseries.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Pagoda Dogwood is a lovely, subtle woodland native tree with attractively layered horizontal branching. The flat fluffy ivory flowers appear in late May to early June and are powerfully fragrant. They are followed by bluish black fruit in August which are attractive to birds. The fall color of Cornus alternifolia is often a mild reddish purple, followed by a winter interest element provided by the purplish horizontal twigs and branches.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 3

    The beautiful white flowers of 'Appalachian Joy' Flowering Dogwood appear in April and May, and have extra bracts to add to their uniqueness. The foliage is highly resistant to powdery mildew. The bright red fall fruit and reddish purple leaves add to its seasonal interest. A long awaited introduction from the University of Tennessee.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Appalachian Spring' Flowering Dogwood has white flowers in April and May and good red fall foliage. 'Appalachian Spring' is resistant to Dogwood Anthracnose! Introduced by the University of Tennessee. Blooms heavily at a young age, but is a slow starter as a young tree.  The parent plant was found in the wild in Maryland, where all the surrounding C. floridas were dead of Anthracnose.

    PRN Preferred:  A more disease resistant native Dogwood cultivar.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Cherokee Brave™ ('Comco No. 1') Flowering Dogwood blooms in mid to late spring, producing dark pink bracts with white centers.  The leaves emerge in shades of burgundy in early spring and mature to green in summer.  The fall color is attractive shades of maroon and red, accented by the bright red fall fruit, much prized by wildlife.  Cornus florida Cherokee Brave™ shows good resistance to mildew, which is one of the reasons why Commercial Nurseries of Tennessee selected it.  Cornus florida fruit is an important food source for migrating birds.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5
    'Cherokee Chief' Flowering Dogwood has ruby red flowers and reddish new growth in April and May. Cornus florida 'Cherokee Chief' has good resistance to Dogwood Anthracnose. Introduced by Hawkersmith Nursery in Tennessee.
    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Cherokee Princess' Flowering Dogwood is a vigorous disease resistant selection which has large white flowers followed by bright red bird-attracting fruit. The fall color is a good red, and plantsman Don Shadow says that it is his favorite classic white Dogwood because of its beauty and ease of growth. Introduced by J C Higden of Kentucky.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    ‘Cloud 9’ Flowering Dogwood is a showy example of one of our most beautiful native trees. The flat flowers, consisting of 4 white overlapping 2” bracts, appear in quantity in April. The white flowers complement both Cercis and Prunus which bloom at the same time. The habit is somewhat ‘Japanese’ because the branching appears in tiers, like ‘cloud pruned’ trees. The green summer leaves are followed by reddish purple fall color and shiny red fruit (an important food source for wildlife). Cornus florida ‘Cloud 9’ was patented in 1961 by Chase Nursery of Alabama.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5

    ‘Dixie Colonade’ Flowering Dogwood was found by Don Shadow in Alabama. The flower parts are surrounded by the classic white bracts, but Cornus florida ‘Dixie Colonade’ is unusual in that its habit is distinctly columnar. The red fruit in fall is complimented by reddish foliage. This is a Cornus florida for small gardens and tight spaces.

    Height: 12 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 5

    ‘Erica’s Appalachian Sunrise’ Flowering Dogwood is another good selection from the Tennessee Agricultural Experimental Station’s breeding work. Cornus florida ‘Appalachian Sunrise’ produces deep pink bracts which have white centers surrounding the actual flowers. The foliage emerges in spring in shades of burgundy, maturing to green in summer and red in fall. The wildlife-friendly red fruit in fall is also showy. Cornus ‘Erica’s Appalachian Sunrise’ is mildew resistant, so it is a good grower in the Northeast.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 5
    'Jean's Appalachian Snow' Flowering Dogwood has large bright white flowers in April and May that are very showy because their bracts overlap. 'Jean's Appalachian Snow' is one of the best recent introductions from the Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station for powdery mildew resistance. Good red fall color, and blooms at a young age.
    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    There have been a number of Flowering Dogwoods in the trade that have bloomed with multiple bracts, but this particular selection is one of the best.  The white flowers are sterile, and are composed of 17 to 24 large bracts which make the extremely showy.  The habit is slow growing and compact (probably because Cornus florida 'Plena' puts so much energy into blooming), so this classic Dogwood fits into small gardens as well as along the edges of woods.  The fall color is an attractive reddish purple.

    Height: 12 Feet
    Spread: 12 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Pumpkin Patch' Flowering Dogwood was found by nurseryman Don Shadow as a chance seedling.  The dark pink flowering Dogwood sports a combination of light green (almost yellow) foliage crowned by burgundy new growth.  What caught his eye in particular was the fall color, which is brilliant orange (hence "Pumpkin Patch"), followed by orange twigs in winter.  'Pumpkin Patch' has shown some susceptibility to mildew in hot humid weather, but it is still a very rare, cool collector's plant.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Greensleeves' Kousa Dogwood has dark green leaves with prominent veins, and is a heavy flowering rapid grower, with excellent red fall color. 'Greensleeves' is a selection by Polly Wakefield of Milton, Mass. A very heavy fruiting Dogwood, and wildlife love the fruit, as do our Labrador Retrievers.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    ‘Little Poncho’ Kousa Dogwood is a compact Korean Dogwood which blooms heavily in spite of its small size. The showy white bracts surround the actual flower parts in May and June. These are followed by large red fruits in fall which look like little hanging Christmas ornaments. The clean disease-resistant green foliage turns attractive shades of red and purple in the fall. This is a good Dogwood for smaller gardens and spaces.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Scarlet Fire® ('Rutpink') Kousa Dogwood is a lovely new introduction from Dr Tom Molnar's work at Rutgers University. The bracts, appearing in June, are a dark strong pink which hold up well in our hot summer weather and often are showy for up to 8 weeks. Cornus kousa Scarlet Fire® is a juvenile bloomer and vigorous grower, with clean disease resistant foliage. The classic red hanging fruit follows the flowers and the fall foliage color is also shades of red. This is the most pink, heaviest flowering Kousa Dogwood we know.

    PRN Preferred:  Plentiful dark pink flowers, heavy bloomer at an early age.  The best pink we have seen.

    Height: 25 Feet
    Spread: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Snow Tower' Korean Dogwood is an upright form of Cornus kousa, which makes it ideal for a tight space.  The large white flowers (bracts) emerge in late May and June, a little later than most Korean Dogwoods.  The very showy flower display is followed by round red fruit in late summer which are very attractive to birds and mammals.  'Snow Tower' Dogwood has reddish purple fall color, and would make an excellent small street tree with several seasons of interest.  Found by Gary Handy of Handy Nursery in Oregon.

    Height: 15 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Wolf Eyes' Kousa Dogwood has white flowers in June and variegated white and green foliage with striking red and pink fall color. It is a Manor View Farms selection. Although its leaves are less susceptible to burning than most other variegated cultivars, Cornus kousa 'Wolf Eyes' still prefers a shady location.  This is Richard Hesselein's favorite variegated Dogwood.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5
    Cornus kousa var. chinensis becomes covered with white flowers in June, followed by showy pendulous red fruit that attracts birds. Fall color is a showy deep red, and exfoliating bark on mature plants adds to winter interest.
    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Venus® ('KN30-8') Hybrid Dogwood has huge white sterile flowers in May and June, and is resistant to Dogwood Anthracnose and powdery mildew. Another winner from Dr. Elwin Orton (the Jersey Star® series). Its claim to fame is that Venus® has the largest, pure white flowers ever observed in the breeding program, reaching 6-8" across.  Venus® is also one of the latest blooming Dogwoods per Bruce Crawford.

    Height: 25 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Cornus mas 'Golden Glory' has bright yellow flowers in March, followed by cherry red showy drupes in summer. Birds love the fruit and the exfoliating bark adds to the winter interest. Introduced by Synnesvedt Nursery of Illinois.  'Golden Glory' Corneliancherry is more upright than other forms, so it makes an attractive early spring tree.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Kintoki' Japanese Cornel Dogwood has small brilliant yellow flowers in March, interesting multi-colored bark, and vivid red fruit in fall. It blooms 2 weeks earlier than Cornus mas and was selected in Japan as an excellent cut flower plant. 'Kintoki' was introduced into the US by Barry Yinger through Brookside Gardens.

    PRN Preferred:  Very showy early yellow blooms, exfoliating bark and brilliant fall color and bright red fruit, a true multi-season plant.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Cornus sanguinea Proven Winners® Color Choice® Arctic Sun® ('Cato') is a variety of Bloodtwig Dogwood that has great winter interest because twigs are bright yellow at base flushing to blood red. Leaves are a good bright yellow in fall. From Andre van Nijnatten, who also brought us 'Winter Flame'.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 3

    Arctic Fire® Red (‘Farrow’) Redosier Dogwood is a beautiful native shrub which lights up the winter landscape with bright red twigs (great for winter containers). Cornus Arctic Fire® 'Red' has green ovate leaves in spring which are topped with flat ivory flower clusters (cymes) in May and June. Ornamental white berries (good food for birds) and deep red leaves follow in the fall. Redosier Dogwoods should be pruned back hard every 1 to 2 years, because the new growth provides the winter color.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 3

    The compact version of ‘Flaviramea’, Cornus stolonifera Arctic Fire® 'Yellow' (SMNCSBD') is the gardener’s answer to a Yellow-Twigged Dogwood with all of the bells and whistles of its parent plant without the aggressive, densely spreading growth habit. This compact cultivar of the Mid-Atlantic native species exhibits spectacular garden performance, with its attractive clusters of white blooms from May to June inviting the attention of bees and butterflies. Following its bloom period, unique, white-to-pale yellow fruits appear, resembling berries, which are enjoyed by birds from the end of summer into early fall. Arctic Fire® 'Yellow' Yellow-Twigged Dogwood is a low-maintenance, multi-seasonal star, capable of tolerating a wide range of conditions including partial to full shade. In late fall and early winter, bright yellow stems stand out in the barren landscape, adding a delightful contrast to the winter garden or to the cut-flower garden, where its attractive twigs can be used in seasonal arrangements for added texture.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 3

    Cornus sericea 'Baileyi' has white flowers followed by bluish fruit. Excellent red fall foliage defoliates to expose reddish purple twigs for winter interest. 'Bailey' Redosier Dogwood is a Bailey Nurseries introduction. It is a rapid grower and relatively salt tolerant. Excellent massed or as a specimen.  Cut the old wood back frequently to maintain the best winter color.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 2

    The light green disease-resistant summer foliage of 'Cardinal' Redosier Dogwood is followed by vivid, cherry red stems in winter.  Tiny white flat topped flower cluster appear in late spring changing to whitish drupes by summer which are eaten by birsds.  Most effective if the old wood is cut back yearly. It is relatively salt tolerant.  Developed by Dr. Pellet and the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, so you know it's tough. 

    PRN Preferred: The color of the twigs starts as a light orange in fall and matures to a bright red in winter on a very rigorous, healthy plant. 

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 3

    Kelsey’s Dwarf Redosier Dogwood is a dwarf Cornus sericea, with an attractive rounded habit and the characteristic red twigs in the winter. The small white flowers (cymes) appear in late spring and are followed in late summer by white berries (drupes) which are attractive to birds. Cornus sericea ‘Kelseyi’ has attractive yellow fall foliage, and with its short rounded habit makes a good foundation plant as well as a short winter interest hedge.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Buttercup Winterhazel has delicate mildly fragrant yellow panicles in March and April.  Native to western Japan and Taiwan, the habit of Corylopsis pauciflora is broad but delicate, with small, neat leaves.  Winterhazel provides late winter to early spring blooms in the landscape before the common Forsythia.

    PRN Preferred:  A smaller neater habit.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Spike Winterhazel has long yellow, very fragrant panicles in March and April. It blooms on racemes before the leaves unfold; plants have many racemes and each raceme has from 6 to 12 flowers.  Corylopsis spicata makes a wonderful cut flower branch to bring inside in the late winter.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Veitch Winterhazel is a showy, fragrant addition to the winter garden with primrose yellow, 3" pendant flowers set off by reddish anthers. Corylopsis veitchiana blooms in March on bare branches and then produces foliage that starts out bronzy and turns to green, with glabrous undersides.  Corylopsis are closely related to Witchhazels and should be sited in a place protected from late spring frosts.

     

     

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Golden Spirit™ ('Ancot') Smokebush has smoky purple-gray flowers in June and July. Bronze new growth turns to chartreuse yellow leaves in summer. Golden Spirit™ has pinkish red and orange fall foliage. From Boskoop, Holland.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Royal Purple' Smokebush has pink smoke-like flowers in June and July which are highlighted by brilliant purple leaves, which turn a reddish purple in fall.  Prune in late winter, cutting back hard will result in new shoots with deeper color and larger leaves but no flowers.  Cotinus coggygria is native from southern Europe to central China and 'Royal Purple' was introduced to the US in 1953 and originated from Lombarts Nursery in Boskoop, Holland.

     

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 4

    The Velvet Fog® (‘SMNCCPP3’) Smokebush combines beautiful blue green foliage with a large production of reddish pink smoke-like flowers in mid summer. Cotinus The Velvet Fog® is an introduction from Tim Wood’s work at Spring Meadow™, chosen for its prolific, long-blooming qualities as well as its showy clean foliage. With its dense growth habit, the Velvet Fog® makes a good deer resistant hedge as well as an attractive specimen.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Winecraft Black® Smokebush ('NCCO1') produces deep purple velvety leaves in spring which are topped by dark pink smoke-like inflorescences in June.  The contrast between the flowers and foliage is striking.  After blooming, Cotinus Winecraft Black® does not fade as many other purple leaf plants do, retaining its dark purple color until fall, when the leaves turn beautiful shades of yellow, orange and red.  All Cotinus benefit from a periodic pruning to promote new growth.

    PRN Preferred: A showy combination of long lasting purple foliage and a compact habit.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Winecraft Gold® (‘MINCOJAU3’) Smokebush was bred in France by Corinne Liquiere. The neat round leaves emerge in orange to chartreuse shades, maturing to lime green by mid summer. Cotinus coggygria Winecraft Gold® is crowned with greenish pink smoke-like inflorescences in early summer on old growth, so do not prune in spring. The habit is compact and the fall foliage is a clean yellow. Winecraft Gold® is more scorch resistant than earlier yellow cultivars.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    American Smoketree bluish to dark green leaves and unique greenish smoke-like flowers in July.  The fall color is spectacular, with shades of yellow, red and purple hues.  The bark is also a beautiful gray and mature trunks become scaly for additional winter interest.   Native to rocky mountain soils and limestone glades from Kentucky, Tennessee, northern Alabama westward to Oklahoma.  American Smokebush was almost lost during the Civil War because it was harvested and used to make yellow dye.  Cotinus obovatus makes a very large shrub or an attractive small tree.

    PRN Preferred:  As noted by Dr. Dirr "may be the best of the all American shrub/trees for intensity of (fall) color." and we agree.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Grace' Smoketree has pink flowers in June and July with bronze new foliage which turns to purple. Cotinus x 'Grace' has luminous reddish purple to orange fall foliage and is a cross from C. coggygria 'Velvet Cloak and C. obovatus. Cotinus is in the same family as and closely related to Rhus (Sumac).  From Peter Dummer, formerly at Hillier Nurseries in England and named after his wife.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Winter King' Green Hawthorn has white flowers in late spring, brilliant red fruit well into the winter, and silver bark. Fruit are larger than the straight species and eaten by many birds including cedar waxwings. Crataegus viridis 'Winter King' has a lovely rounded habit, is more disease resistant and is largely spinless (with only occasional small thorns to 1.5" long).  One of our favorite multi-season small trees.  Introduced by Simpson Nursery, Vincennes, IN in 1955.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 25 Feet
    Zone: 4

    ‘Emily McKenzie’ Montbretia is a wonderful iris relative with striking coral-orange flowers with red banding along its throat. As with all other Crocosmia, 'Emily McKenzie' should be planted deeper than typical or protected by extra mulch due to its winter hardiness, or lack thereof. Well worth the effort, your garden will be rewarded with wonderful bright oranges and reds from late spring through August.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 5

    The bright red flowers of 'Lucifer' Montbretia appear on long arching stems in July. Blooms for an extended time above broad, Gladiolus-like foliage. Excellent cut flower and a hummingbird magnet. The genus name comes from the Greek language and means "saffron smell," which reportedly can be detected when dried flowers are steeped in warm water. Native to South Africa, Crocosmia 'Lucifer' needs good drainage and will naturalize in time.  An exotic-looking plant, hard to believe it is hardy in our area, but it certainly is. An Alan Bloom hybrid.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    The blackish green evergreen foliage of 'Black Dragon' Japanese Cedar has an interesting irregular texture on an upright plant. Cryptomeria japonica 'Black Dragon' is much slower and smaller than C. 'Yoshino', so excellent for smaller spaces.  'Black Dragon' gets its name from its dark green needles that, in shade, almost look black.  This cultivar originated as a seedling selected in the mid-1980s by Iseli Nursery, Boring, Oregon.  It is also salt tolerant.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Dwarf Globe Japanese Cedar is a dense rounded evergreen which adds a lot of color to the year-round landscape. The tight needles are a vivid bright green in the summer. In the fall and winter, they turn bluish purple with shades of rust. Since it is both pest resistant and compact, 'Globosa Nana' works well as a foundation evergreen, especially where deer are a problem. Pruning will probably never be needed to keep its neat habit.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Radicans' Japanese Cedar is very similar to Cryptomeria 'Yoshino' in texture, habit and hardiness, but its habit is tighter with foliage for emerald green.  It is also more resistance to winter leader problems.  Untermyer Gardens in Yonkers, NY has a large planting of Cryptomeria japonica 'Radicans' flanking the stairs of the Vista Garden leading down to the Hudson River.  Head gardener, Timothy Tilghman finds 'Radicans' to be very wind resistant with less browning in the interior branches than 'Yoshino'.   A very useful and rewarding conifer. It is also salt tolerant.

    Height: 40 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Yoshino' Japanese Cedar has dark green foliage and an upright habit. It is surprisingly shade and salt tolerant. It makes a large hedge very rapidly.

    Height: 40 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Leyland Cypress is a very fast growing, uniform evergreen conifer which makes a clean green hedge in a hurry. xCupressocyparis leylandii is best from containers because the root system seems to be slower growing than the top, and thus difficult to dig and transplant.

    Height: 60 Feet
    Spread: 10 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Cyrtomium falcatum ‘Rochfordianum’ is a hardy, evergreen fern with attractive pinnate fronds, capable of handling both partial to full shade as well as dry to moist but well-drained soils. The graceful, arching form and vase-shaped habit of the 2’ long fronds make quite a statement in the woodland garden, with its stiff, leathery pinnae acting as a textural contrast amongst the dreary winter landscape, and its dark green year-round color adding a layer of mystique amongst container plantings and shade gardens alike. Rochford’s Holly Fern not only makes a fantastic addition to the outdoor landscape, but it can also be used to jazz up the interior landscape as a dutiful houseplant.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 6
    The large shiny evergreen leaves of False Daphne give a tropical effect, often augmented by distinct reddish color on the petioles and young stems. Also known by the colorful common name of 'Redneck Rhododendron' in the South because the foliage looks similar to Rhododendron maximum, only more showy. Plants are dioecious, so you need several plants to get the glaucous blue summer fruit.
    Height: 15 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Indian Rhubarb is an unusual dramatic foliage perennial which also has attractive pink flower clusters in April. The delicate flower clusters emerge on hairy stems before the leaves emerge, and are retained for a long period. The round lobe leaves are very large and broad, and have been likened to inside-out umbrellas. Darmera peltata has a thick rhizomaceous root system, and since it thrives in very wet sites, it works well as a stream stabilizer. The fall color of the foliage is often red. This is one of Jerry Fritz's favorite plants for its dramatic appeal. Umbrella Plant is a West Coast native. It will tolerate full sun if planted in a wet site.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Cooper Hardy Ice Plant has magenta flowers over silvery evergreen succulent foliage. Delosperma cooperi needs full sun and a dry site and is perfect for the xeriscape landscape. We are impresses with its cold hardiness in our display beds, and it blooms throughout the summer starting in late June into fall. Avoid planting in heavy soils or soils with poor drainage. 

    Height: 4 Inches
    Spread: 8 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Fire Spinner™ Ice Plant has truly amazing flowers, with multiple flat petals that start orange at the outer edges and end up magenta at the base.  Starting in early June, Fire Spinner™ blooms for a month on every sunny day over the attractive fleshy green succulent foliage.  Found at high altitudes in southern South Africa, Delosperma dyeri Fire Spinner™ was brought to the US by Panayoti Kelaidis of the Denver Botanic Garden.  Rock gardens and green roofs are great places to use this eye opener.

    Height: 2 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Tall Blue Larkspur is a Delphinium that actually thrives on the East Coast!  This native woodland plant blooms in mid summer, with tall spikes of deep bluish purple flowers which are an important source of nectar for hummingbirds.  Rich, well drained soil and partial shade are what Delphinium exaltatum likes best, and deer will leave it alone.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Hay-scented Fern has lacy green foliage that will take somewhat dry, relatively sunny sites. Dennstaedtia punctilobula is a deciduous spreader that can handle poor soils well. When the fronds are brushed against, they release the smell of fresh cut hay.  Native to open woods and wooded banks in the eastern and midwestern US. 

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 3
    Deschampsia cespitosa has delicate green foliage topped by airy panicles in fall. Shade and wet site tolerant, clump-forming, semi-evergreen.
    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Goldtau' Tufted Hairgrass is a compact form of this lovely cool season native grass.  The name 'Godtau' means 'Golden Dew', which refers to the airy quality of the yellow inflorescences appearing in July to September.  The dark green blades are semi-evergreen and happy in shady locations.   Deschampsia 'Goldtau' is beautiful in mass plantings or mixed with ferns and other woodland perennials.  The fall color of the seedheads is bronze.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Nikko' Slender Deutzia has delicate white flowers in April and May. The low growing neat green leaves turn purple in fall. Deutzia gracilis 'Nikko' makes an excellent flowering groundcover or foundation plant for sun and shade. A wonderful National Arboretum introduction.  The cultivar name 'Nikko' appears to have been coined by British nurseryman C.G. Hollett of Greenbank Nursery, Cumbria, England. 

    PRN Preferred:  A three season groundcover shrub, a real garden workhorse.  Continues to perform year after year.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Yuki Cherry Blossom® (‘NCDX2’) Slender Deutzia is a color breakthrough by Dr. Tom Ranney of NCSU. Normally a white flowered groundcover shrub, Yuki Cherry Blossom® is covered with delicate soft pink flowers in April and May. The small green leaves are borne on graceful arching branches which root where they touch the ground, making Deutzia x Yuki Cherry Blossom® an excellent low maintenance groundcover. The fall color is bronzy purple, which adds another season of beauty.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Yuki Snowflake® ('NCDX1') Deutzia blooms heavily in April and May, covering this low mounding shrub with a multitude of bell-like white flowers.  The delicate green leaves are held on arching branches which root when touching the soil making Deutzia x Yuki Snowflake® an attractive shade tolerant groundcover.  The foliage turns shades of burgundy in fall and is most colorful when grown in full sud.  A lovely hybrid from the work of Dr Tom Ranney of NC State.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Nikko Blush' Slender Deutzia is a cross made by the US National Arboretum between Deutzia gracilis 'Nikko' and Deutzia x rosea 'Carminea'. The result is a plant long sought by plant lovers, with bright pink buds opening in April and May to abundant soft pink flowers on arching low growing branches. Like 'Nikko', 'Nikko Blush' makes an excellent groundcover, and would be particularly attractive growing down a wall. The fall color is shades of burgundy.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Clusterhead Pinks is a Dianthus oddity hailing from the alpine regions of central and southeastern Europe.  Like all Dianthus, D. carthusianorum prefers soil with sharp drainage but the brilliant pink flowers of this gem stand 2-3 feet above the foliage, not unlike one of our favorites Verbena bonariensis. Equally at home in a prairie or rock garden, this exciting Dianthus species deserves much more attention that it currently gets in the trade.  It probably owes its name to the Catholic order of the Carthusians, who cultivated it early on in their monastery gardens and as medicinal plant.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Firewitch' ('Feuerhexe') Cheddar Pinks has shocking pink fragrant flowers, low growing blue foliage, and is an excellent repeat bloomer. The fragrance is wonderful, like so many of the Carnation family.  Developed in Germany, 'Firewitch' is more tolerant of heat and varying soil conditions, and is one of the longest flowering.  Native to Cheddar Gorge, England, hense the common name.  2006 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 8 Inches
    Zone: 5

    A selection by Darwin Perennials, Dianthus hybrida Mountain Frost™ ‘Red Garnet’ (‘KonD1335K1’), is chosen for its striking, deep red blooms that first appear in late spring around early June and continually bloom through summer and fall, as late as mid-November and early December in mild winters. Tidy, mounding habit exhibits silvery, blue-green foliage and makes a wonderful accent to the pathway or pollinator garden. Once established, this plant can tolerate periods of drought and dry conditions.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 5

    A selection of the Mountain Frost™ series by Darwin Perennials, Dianthus hybrida Mountain Frost™ ‘Ruby Glitter’ (‘KonD1400K6’) is an eye-popping variety of bi-colored Cheddar Pinks that is sure to add visual interest to the sunny border or rock garden. Deep red petals with splotches of light pink rebloom continuously from June to November over top a tidy mound of silvery blue-green foliage. Capable of handling wet and rainy conditions as well as drought once established.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Dianthus hybrida Mountain Frost™ ‘Ruby Snow’ (‘KonD1400K6’), a selection by Darwin Perennials, is a unique and versatile variety of Pinks that features creamy white petals with ruby red eyes in the centers. Like the rest of the Mountain Frost™ series, these Alpine Pinks are known for their consistent mounding habits and long reblooming period from June to November. Characteristic silvery gray-blue foliage contrasts nicely in the rock garden or sunny border.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Kahori, meaning fragrant in Japanese, is a Cheddar Pinks that has been around for several years without the attention it truly deserves. A repeat bloomer from late spring through summer this Dianthus boasts deep pink flowers that just never know when to quit. Oh yeah, it’s also fragrant in case you were wondering! Low mounding, medium green foliage stays clean when other lesser Dianthus start to look ratty in the heat.

    Height: 10 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Fringed Bleeding Heart combines pink heart-shaped pendant flowers held on arching stems with attractive dissected gray green leaves. Dicentra eximia starts flowering in late spring and continues blooming well into the summer, especially if the weather is cool.  A native wildflower of the eastern United States that typically occurs on forest floors, rocky woods and ledges in the Appalachian Mountains. The ferny foliage is attractive all summer, unlike Dicentra spectabilis. Under moist conditions Fringed Bleeding Heart will often rebloom into late summer, especially if deadheaded.  It spreads by self-seeding and seed dispersal by ants.  It grows best in well drained shady locations.  Visited by hummingbirds and long tongued native bees.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    The pink and white flowers of Bleeding Heart have a long bloom period in late spring. The entire stems can be used for cut flowers, lasting up to 2 weeks in a vase.  Foliage fades away by late summer. This is the classic Bleeding Heart we all remember from our childhoods.  Native to eastern Asia (northern China, Korea and Japan). New name is Lamprocapnos spectabilis.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    White Bleeding Heart has white flowers for a long bloom period in late spring. The large pendant flowering stems light up shade gardens beautifully. Foliage fades away by late summer.  New name is Lamprocapnos spectabilis 'Alba'.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Gold Heart' Bleeding Heart has the classic pink and white heart-shaped pendant flowers, but they hang from pink stems which rise from electric yellow foliage in the spring. The leaves light up the shade garden beautifully. By mid summer the foliage matures to chartreuse green. Introduced by Nori Pope of England.

    PRN Preferred: The contrast between the classic pink and white flowers and the vivid chartreuse foliage in spring is really amazing. 

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Ruby Gold’ Bleeding Heart has the beautiful yellow foliage of Dicentra ‘Gold Heart,’ but the plant is topped by red “bleeding heart” flowers on reddish stems in late spring. Dicentra spectabilis ‘Ruby Gold’ needs shady sites with reliable moisture and good drainage. All Dicentra spectabilis cultivars tend to go dormant in the hot summers, but the foliage will sometimes reemerge as the weather cools down. The new name is Lamprocapnos spectabilis ‘Ruby Gold.’

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    A wonderful improvement over the typical species, 'Valentine' Bleeding Heart produces deep red flowers as opposed to the soft pink of straight Dicentra spectabilis. The foliage is beautifully and deeply dissected and is accompanied by arching stems of stunning red flowers in late spring. Like the species, expect Dicentra spectabilis 'Valentine' to look like it has seen better days as the summer progresses so be sure to plant material around it that can mask its tired appearance.

    Height: 26 Inches
    Spread: 26 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘White Gold’ Bleeding Hearts combines the vivid yellow foliage of Dicentra ‘Gold Heart’ with the classic pendant heart-shaped flowers, in white. Dicentra spectabilis ‘White Gold’ appeared as a spontaneous seedling in the garden of Margaret Dalton in New York. It is an excellent addition to spring shade gardens, as the combination of chartreuse foliage and arching stems of white flowers in April and May really light up the landscape. Like other Dicentra spectabilis cultivars, the foliage of ‘White Gold’ tends to become dormant in hot weather. New name is Lamprocapnos.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Burning Hearts' Fringed Bleeding Heart has very deep colored flowers, with dark rosy red hanging hearts that have a lovely white edge to the petals. The foliage is a delicate, lacy grayish blue and persists all summer, as does the bloom period which begins in May. Dicentra x 'Burning Hearts' performs best in moist but well drained shade.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Fire Island' Fringed Bleeding Heart is a beautiful cross by Akira Shiozoki, the breeder of D. x 'Burning Hearts'. The flowers are an even deeper red than its sibling, with purple tips to the heart-shaped pendant blooms. The foliage is a delicate dissected bluish green setting for the summer long flower display. Performs best in dry shade.

    Height: 15 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'King of Hearts' Fringed Bleeding Heart has red flowers in May over attractive bluish green foliage. It blooms for a long period, and has a neat compact habit. Prefers a well-drained site.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Luxuriant' Bleeding Heart has cherry red flowers in late spring over green lacy foliage. It reblooms well throughout the summer, and does best in a site with good drainage.

    PRN Preferred: This Bleeding Heart blooms almost all summer, and the lacy green foliage is vigorous and long lasting.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Pink Diamonds’ Fern-leaved Bleeding Heart is an introduction from Walters Gardens with both showy flowers and foliage. The fern-like leaves are steely blue, and the two-toned pink heart-shaped flowers bloom from late spring through most of the summer. Dicentra x ‘Pink Diamonds’ thrives in sunny locations with good drainage, as well as partial shade sites. Since ‘Pink Diamonds’ comes from alpine Dicentras, it is very cold tolerant, and should be a good addition to roof gardens.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Gas Plant is a beautiful long-lived perennial for well-drained sites; sporting many showy, mauve pink flowers on tall spikes in June for an extended show. Dictamnus is slow to become established, but once started it becomes a large mound which puts out increasing numbers of flower-topped shoots every year. It has zero tolerance for transplanting, so pick your site well. The common name refers to the theory that it contains enough volatile oils to be lit by matches; but, as Dr. Alan Armitage so eloquently comments, this is not an achievable activity.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Copper' Bush Honeysuckle has sulfur yellow flowers in July, over copper colored new foliage. The fall color is shades of bronze, orange and red.  It is a  It is a suckering, densely-branched, shrub that when in bloom is loved by butterflies.  Diervilla lonicera 'Copper' is a very tough, maintenance-free plant, and tolerates dry shade well. Insects love the flowers.

    PRN Preferred:  A true multi-seasonal plant plus it is native and deer resistant.  That's impressive.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 3

    'Butterfly' Southern Bush-honeysuckle has delicate bright yellow flowers June to July over green, disease-free foliage. The fall color of Diervilla sessifolia 'Butterfly' is shades of purple. It does well in dry, shady sites. A selection from Pieter Zwijnenburg of Holland.

    PRN Preferred: Bright sulfer yellow summer flowers are followed by reddish purple fall foliage.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Kodiak® Orange ('G2X88544') Bush-honeysuckle puts out vivid orange new growth in he spring and summer.  Mature leaves are green, and are topped with bright sulfer yellow flowers throughout the summer, attracting butterflies, pollinators and hummingbirds.  Diervilla is a wonderful native for its compact neat habit and its showy orange red fall color.  Kodiak® Orange is also very versitile, as it does well in sun and shade, average and dry soils, and areas with deer pressure.

    PRN Preferred: Attractive orange colored new growth in summer is followed by beautiful orange red fall color.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Kodiak® Red ('G2X885411') Bush-honeysuckle is a multi-purpose small shrub.  The new growth emerges in shades or red and bronze in spring and summer.  The spreading branches are tipped with sulfur yellow trumpet shaped flowers for an extended period, attracting butterflies, hummingbirds and other pollinators.  Then in the fall, Diervilla Kodiak® Red puts on an extraordinary show as its leaves turn bright red.  Use as a specimen or a low hedge.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Foxy' Common Foxglove has white, cream and dark pink speckled tubular flowers in June and July.  Best known as a popular bouquet flower and for its ability to attract hummingbirds.  Biennial, but will self-seed.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Strawberry Foxglove is a true perennial Foxglove, with strawberry pink spikes of tubular spotted flowers in June. It is a  is a cross between D. purpurea and D. grandiflora. Individual flowers resemble the snipped off fingers of a glove, hence the common name of foxglove.  Needs good drainage.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Brilliance™ Autumn Fern was selected for its striking new fronds which emerge throughout the spring and summer in shades of salmon, copper and orange.  The semi-evergreen fronds then mature to glossy medium green, adding a bright note to woodland settings.  Since Autumn Ferns spread slowly by rhizomes, they make a good groundcover in shady sites.  Consistent moisture is needed to promote new frond production.

    PRN Preferred:  Bronze new growth all spring and summer.  Looks good throughout most of the winter.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Robust Male Fern has dark green foliage, and does well in deep shade, as well as in sun. Dryopteris filix-mas is a deciduous clump. Highly adaptable because it is relatively sun tolerant.  Dryopteris filix-mas is refered to as Male Fern because it was thought to be the male version of Athyrium filix-femina (Lady Fern).

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Evergreen Wood Fern has dark green, leathery foliage and tolerates relatively dry sites and deep shade. Dryopteris marginalis is an evergreen clump that performs well on forest edges.  The foliage remains green through much of the winter, dying back in early spring as new fiddleheads emerge.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 2

    ‘Jurassic Gold’ (‘Hollasic’) Wallich’s Wood Fern has amazing spring fronds in shades of yellow, gold and orange. The semi-evergreen foliage matures to bright green in summer, forming an attractive clump that lights up shady locations. Dryopteris ‘Jurassic Gold’ is named for is named for the Jurassic Coast in Southern England, but I assume that is also a nod to the fact that Ferns are a very ancient plant group. The very striking fronds make ‘Jurassic Gold’ a good container candidate for shady locations.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Dixie Wood Fern has shiny green foliage which is large and dramatic. It is a vigorous cross between the Log Fern and the Southern Wood Fern. A large, semi-evergreen clump.  Dryopteris x australis has a clumping fern with a tall upright arching appearance.  2021 PHS Gold Medal Plant.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    North American native Echinacea angustifolia is a drought-tolerant perennial common to meadows, prairies, and grassland areas throughout the United States. Raspberry-pink, daisy-like flowers with globular chestnut brown centers begin to appear in June and often continue blooming into August, followed by upright seedheads that are enjoyed by songbirds, especially American Goldfinches. Known commonly as Narrow-leaf Coneflower for its narrow, lanceolate foliage, the hairy leaves are basal in nature, with the wiry, stiff stems of the inflorescences protruding upright. Long-revered for its use in Native American medicine, Echinacea angustifolia makes for a colorful addition to the medicinal garden, or to the pollinator garden where its nectar is sure to be enjoyed by a variety of native bees and butterflies. Narrow-leaf coneflower benefits from well-drained soils and full sun conditions, and it is capable of handling difficult growing conditions such as drought, clay, and shallow, rocky soils.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    A tall drink of water for the meadow garden! North American prairie and grassland native, Echinacea pallida is ready to take over the full sun perennial garden as an incredibly low-maintenance, easily spreading, drought-tolerant Jack-of-all-trades. Echinacea pallida boasts slender, pale pink ray petals, held together by central chestnut-magenta disk-petals, like delicate pink daisies from June to August. Pale Purple Coneflower’s showy blooms are a favorite of both gardeners and pollinators alike – hummingbirds, various native bee species, skippers, butterflies, and moths are known to visit Echinacea pallida throughout its bloom period, while its foliage is a larval host for the Silvery Checkerspot Butterfly. Echinacea pallida is known for having high nutritive and medicinal value, acting as both a nourishing food source for livestock as well as having a long history of being used in traditional Native American medicine to treat respiratory illnesses and promote immunity. Despite its delectability to livestock, deer tend not to bother this plant too much. Visually similar to its cousin, Echinacea simulata, in many ways, Echinacea pallida can be differentiated by its narrow, slightly hairier foliage, white pollen, and earlier bloom time.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Yellow coneflower has large daisy-like flowers with drooping petals surrounding brownish prominent cones. Echinacea paradoxa starts blooming in mid-June and keeps producing lots of flowers on long green stems through July, especially if deadheaded. Yellow Coneflowers prefer good drainage, and can self-seed if the seedheads are left to ripen. They provide a valuable seed source for finches in  fall, but the plants will over-winter better if most of the flowers are removed when spent. The long leaves are smooth and lance shaped.  Echinacea paradoxa has a deep tap root that helps it survive drought conditions. 

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Purple Coneflower produces pink to light purple daisy-like flowers throughout the summer. Since Echinacea purpurea is propagated by seed, there is a wide variation in height and flower color, so this is a great candidate for naturalistic settings like meadows and wildflower gardens. The cones should be left on the plants after blooming when possible, as Echinacea purpurea is a significant fall and winter food source for songbirds.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Introduced by Kieft-Pro Seeds in 2002, Echinacea purpurea ‘Cheyenne Spirit’ boasts a beautiful, uniquely mixed palette of red, pink, yellow, orange, cream, white and purple flowers with brown centers. Full bloom occurs from June to August, with sporadic blooms occurring into September and October. If spent flowers are not deadheaded, blackened Coneflower seeds make a nutritious food source for Goldfinches and other songbirds in winter. Winner of the All-American Selections® award in 2013, and Europe’s FleuroSelect Gold Medal award for its performance in the garden. This selection is great for attracting hummingbirds and butterflies to the pollinator garden, and can used in fresh and dried cut flower arrangements. Echinacea purpurea types are host plants for the larval stage of Chloryne nyceteis, the silvery checkerspot butterfly caterpillar.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Fiery Meadow Mama’ Coneflower is an unusual Echinacea, with yellow drooping petals that flush to red at the cone. The petals are topped by deeper red cones, which provide important food for the birds when ripe. Echinacea ‘Fiery Meadow Mama’ has a prolonged bloom period, from late June into August. This color breakthrough looks wonderful with grasses and other prairie plants.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Intense Orange’ (‘TNECK10’) Coneflower is one of the Kismet® series from Terra Nova Nurseries’ breeding program. The large fragrant deep orange flowers appear in late June and are produced for an extended period through the summer. The cones in the centers of the horizontal petals are a darker orange, and provide an important food source for native birds when ripe. Pollinators also benefit from the food provided by this showy native.

    PRN Preferred: Very showy orange flowers are an unusual color for Echinaceas.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Raspberry (‘TNECHKR’) Coneflower has deep raspberry red horizontal flowers held on strong short stems. Echinacea Kismet® ‘Raspberry’ is a compact version of the Kismet® series from Terra Nova, and is notable for its long bloom period, with individual flowers holding their color for several weeks. This Coneflower is a great addition to perennial borders because of its short stature and the great number of flowers on each plant.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Kismet® 'Red' (‘TNECHKRD’) Coneflower has a beautiful combination of bright red flowers on dark bronze stems. The daisy shaped coneflowers have showy flat petals surrounding orange red prominent cones, and Echinacea Kismet® 'Red' keeps blooming for a long time in mid summer, producing a number of short sturdy blooms. The compact stature makes this Echinacea a good front-of-the-border perennial for sunny well-drained sites. From the Terra Nova® Kismet® series of Echinaceas.

    Height: 20 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Yellow’ (‘TNECHY’) Coneflower is a butter yellow compact Echinacea of the Kismet® series from Terra Nova. The horizontal bright yellow petals surround a greenish cone and are held on sturdy short stems. Kismet® 'Yellow' Coneflower blooms heavily from late June through August, and the individual flowers retain their color for several weeks. Deadheading prolongs the bloom period but the seed heads are an important source of winter food for small birds.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4
    'Magnus' Purple Coneflower has pink flowers in June and July. The dried seeds feed Goldfinches in the fall. From the Jelitto Seed Company. 1998 Perennial Plant of the Year.
    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Mellow Yellows’ Coneflower is a seed selection from Jelitto Perennial Seeds that produces yellow flowers in a range of color shades. Echinacea purpurea ‘Mellow Yellows’ blooms in its first year and shows good winter survival. Pollinators get nectar from the orange cones in summer and finches (particularly Goldfinches) depend on the seeds for needed food in the fall.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Pow WowWhite’ Coneflower is a compact, heavily flowering selection with flat white petals surrounding the round orange cones. Since the ‘PowWow’ series does not require vernalization, ‘PowWow White’ and ‘PowWow Wildberry’ start blooming early in summer and keep going well into August. The compact habit and sturdy stems makes this Coneflower an excellent choice for the front of perennial beds and rock gardens. Insects and song birds use Echinacea significantly as a food source.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘PowWow Wildberry’ Coneflower blooms for a very long period starting in June and continuing into August. The vivid rose pink flowers have flat petals surrounding the orange cone and are held up on thick sturdy stems. The ‘PowWow’ series of Echinaceas are from seed, but their compact habit and clear colors are consistent, unlike many seed strains. Introduced by PanAm seeds, and reliably hardy in sunny dry sites in the Northeast.

    PRN Preferred:  Compact habit, overwinters very well.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3
    'White Swan' Purple Coneflower has large white flowers for an extended time in summer. Deadheading after the first flowering will help it rebloom, but if you leave them on, birds will enjoy the seeds in the fall.
    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    A showy summertime standout for the native perennial garden! Echinacea simulata, known commonly as the Glade Coneflower or the Ozark Coneflower for its preferred prairie-grassland habitat, is a North American native known as much for its attractive qualities as it is for being highly adaptable to a variety of site conditions. Echinacea simulata is highly tolerant of rocky, shallow soils, and is capable of handling partial shade as long as it has well-drained soil. The pale pink blooms with coppery-orange centers appear from June to July, often reblooming sporadically into August. Various pollinators are known to visit Glade Coneflowers, collecting the yellow pollen as they forage for nectar. Following its summertime bloom period, persistent seedheads remain upright over narrow, medium-green foliage, and often remain throughout fall and into winter when they are harvested by hungry Goldfinches.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Rocky Top' Tennessee Coneflower is a nursery-grown selection of the rare native which is on the Endangered Species list for wild plants.  Echinacea 'Rocky Top' was selected from a seed grown population because of its greater vigor and larger pink coneflowers.  The blooms appear above the long narrow leaves in June and July.  It grows best in sunny, well-drained sites.  This rare Southeastern native is a good source of food for both Goldfinches (seed) and butterflies (nectar).

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Paper Bush has amazingly fragrant clumps of little yellow tubular flowers (it's in the Daphne family!) on the tips of branches from January to March. Long tropical-looking deciduous green leaves, must be in a very protected site (and keep mulch away from the base of the plant) but the winter fragrance of Edgeworthia chrysantha flowers on a warm day makes it worth it.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6

    The beautiful violet flowers of 'Lilafee' Barrenwort are large in size, over neat, delicate foliage in April. Epimediums thrive in dry shade and 'Lilafee' is semi-evergreen. An interesting fact about Epimediums is that they are in the Barberry family (hence deer resistant).

    Height: 10 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Purple Pixie' Barrenwort was found by Dr Richard Lighty in his own garden, as a surprising sport of Epimedium grandiflorum 'Alba'.  The delicate flowers are a deep violet purple with extended white spurs, and they hover over the fine green foliage in April.  'Purple Pixie' makes an excellent semi-evergreen clump in shady dry locations, and the refined, heart-shaped leaves emerge in the spring in shades of burgundy and purple.  'Purple Pixie' performed very well in the Chicago Botanic Garden's Epimedium trials.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Red Beauty' Barrenwort has large rosy red flowers held above the semi-evergreen foliage in April. It spreads slowly to make an excellent groundcover for dry shady sites. This is a hard-to-find Epimedium, but worth the hunt since its long spurred blooms are very showy.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Epimedium grandiflorum 'Rose Queen' has rosy pink flowers of large size in April, making it a very showy Barrenwort. It thrives in dry shade and is semi-evergreen. The flowers look like miniature Columbines hovering above the leaves.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Bandit’ Barrenwort is a beautiful new Epimedium with ethereal clusters of white flowers over delicate green leaves accented with burgundy borders. The showy borders and hovering flowers appear in early spring, and the neat foliage matures in summer to shades of green. Epimedium grandiflorus var. higoense ‘Bandit’ makes a perfect groundcover for dry shady sites because of its tolerance to deer, rabbits and dry conditions. It was brought to the US by We Du Nursery years ago, but selected and named by Darrell Probst for its gorgeous foliage.

    Height: 8 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Spine Tingler’ Barrenwort was found by Darrell Probst (the Epimedium King) on a cliff in China. The evergreen foliage is attractively narrow, spiny and a dark leathery green. The delicate pale yellow flowers hover above the leaves in April and May, looking somewhat like tiny yellow moths. Epimedium ‘Spine Tingler’ makes a slow growing but excellent dry shade groundcover because deer and rabbits ignore it and it keeps attractive foliage throughout the winter. Another name for it is ‘Fairy Wings.’

    Height: 8 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Wudang Star’ Barrenwort was collected by Roy Lancaster on Wudang mountain in China. The evergreen foliage has bronze flecks in spring, and is topped in April by delicate white flowers displayed on 18” fine stems. Epimedium stellulatum ‘Wudang Star’ is appropriately named because the blooms hover like tiny stars above the clump of foliage. A great choice for rocky sites with good shade.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Caramel’ Wushan Barrenwort was introduced from China by the great Japanese plantsman Mikinori Ogisu. The delicate yellow to light orange flowers hover over burgundy colored emerging foliage in early spring. The narrow leaves have spiny serrations along their edges, and turn from burgundy in the spring to shades of green by mid summer. This is a great dry shade deer resistant groundcover.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 6

    ‘Sandy Claws’ Barrenwort (also called ‘Fairy Wings’) is an obscure Chinese find by Darrell Probst. The foliage is really unusual: spiny evergreen leaves emerge in spring with chocolate coloring, making a striking setting for the white and yellow flower panicles. Unlike other E. wushanense selections, Epimedium ‘Sandy Claws’ is both compact and spreading, so it makes a good dry shade groundcover. The maroon spring foliage color matures to dark green from summer through fall and winter.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 6
    'Amber Queen' Barrenwort is a beautiful new addition to this wonderful group of plants, with prolific yellow spider-like flowers tipped with orange in April and May. The foliage is semi-evergreen and emerges red, to mature to green in summer. Epimedium x 'Amber Queen' is a dry site introduction from Robin White in England.
    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Domino' Barrenwort comes from the prolific hybridizing work of Darrell Probost, the 'Epimedium King'.  Epimedium x 'Domino' is a very heavy bloomer in April and May, producing a multitude of airy flowers displayed on burgundy stems.  The blooms have long white spurs which end in rose purple cupped centers.  The spikes emerge from toothed evergreen leaves which are mottled with large burgundy spots.  This is one of Tony Avent's favorite 'Fairy Wings' because of its heavy reliable flower production.

    PRN Preferred: We agree with Tony, we love this Epimedium. A very heavy bloomer with dark stems supporting the delicate flowers.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Mandarin Star' Barrenwort is a new introduction from China with unusual floral coloration.  The tepals ("spurs") are long and white, and the petals are yellow.  The delicate blooms float above the heart-shaped leaves in April.  Epimedium x 'Mandarin Star' delicate beauty is making this Barrenwort increasingly in demand.  The foliage is semi-evergreen and attractively dentate, with bronze new growth emerging with the flowers in April.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 20 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Pink Champagne' Barrenwort blooms heavily in April, producing many long graceful panicles covered with delicate hovering blooms.  The spurs are long and white, surrounding deep pink cups.  The mottled evergreen foliage continues the show after the bloom period with dark purple splotches decorating the fine green leaves.  Another striking contribution from the prolific breeding work of Darrell Probost.  Like all Epimediums, this makes an excellent long lived groundcover for dry shade.

    PRN Preferred: Airy pink and white flowers hover above attractive mottled foliage.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Pink Elf' Barrenwort blooms in April, with lots of delicate pink flowers hovering over the fine evergreen foliage.  The spurs are pale pink and the cups are a darker bronzy pink.  The leaves are heart shaped, and new growth in the spring starts out with attractive pinkish flecks.  This interspecies hybrid comes from Robin White and makes an excellent compact groundcover for shady areas.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Pink Panther’ Barrenwort is an introduction from Thierry Delabroye, the great French Heuchera breeder. Epimedium x ‘Pink Panther’ produces delicate lavender pink flowers on arching stems above spiny evergreen foliage in April. The leaves are dark green and leathery, making an interesting addition to shade gardens even when not in bloom.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Frohnleiten' Barrenwort has butter yellow flowers with good strong color in April and May. It does well in dry shade and is semi-evergreen. The new leaves have red veining in spring, which shows up again in the fall.

    Height: 10 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3
    Red Barrenwort has red flowers in April over red-tinged green leaves. It is a vigorous shade groundcover and semi-evergreen. The flowers are relatively large for a Barrenwort.
    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Sulfur Barrenwort has yellow flowers in April over large green leaves. It is a vigorous shade groundcover that is semi-evergreen and covers an area more rapidly than most Barrenworts.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Ellen Willmott' Barronwort comes from the English garden of Warley Place and is named after its former owner.  A hybrid of E. alpinum and E. pinnatum ssp colchicum, 'Ellen Willmott' produces a multitude of delicate orange and yellow flowers in early spring.  They are displayed above heart shaped green leaves which emerge in shades of light purple and turn to green.  Epimedium x 'Ellen Willmott' is semi-evergreen and extremely tolerant of dry shade, deer and rabbit, making it an excellent long term groundcover.

    'Orange Queen' ('Orangekoningin') Barrenwort has pale orange flowers that float above the red-tinged newly emerging leaves. The foliage matures to green in the summer, with reddish tones in the fall. Semi-evergreen and dry site tolerant.  The species name warleyense indicates that this lovely Barrenwort's parents originated in the English garden Warley Place, belonging to Miss Ellen Willmott, but the actual cross was the work of the German plantsman Ernst Pagels.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Merlin’ Young’s Barrenwort starts blooming in early spring, producing delicate lavender purple nodding flowers that resemble tiny Columbines. The small heart-shaped leaves also emerge in early spring in shades of wine and purple, turning green in early summer. Epimedium x youngianum ‘Merlin’ was found as a chance seedling in the garden of Amy Doncaster in England. ‘Merlin’ is slow growing but forms a tough, pest resistant mat in time.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4
    The white flowers of Young's White Barrenwort appear over small delicate foliage in May. Newly emerging leaves are purple, turning to green as they mature. It is semi-evergreen and slow growing.
    Height: 10 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Despite being a North American native, Equisetum hyemale brings a unique vertical quality to the landscape with its starkly upright, cylindrical aerial parts. Dating back to prehistoric eras as one of the first vascular plant species according to the fossil record, Equisetum hyemale, known commonly as scouring rush and horsetail, rides the line between fern-relative and perennial-relative. Small, fertile, terminal cones produce spores typically in mid-summer, encouraging a healthy reproduction of the species not only by environmental factors but by prolific rhizomatous growth as well.  Although it may become somewhat aggressive in wet, poorly drained areas, horsetail remains evergreen throughout the winter and adds an interesting textural component to the rain, wetland, or a low-lying spot in the medicinal garden. 

    Height: 42 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Purple Lovegrass is a short warm season grass which is best planted in mass.  The effect is stunning when Eragrostis spectabilis comes into bloom in August and September.  The airy panicles are bright shades of reddish purple, making a showy carpet over sandy, dry and infertile soils.  In the fall the foliage takes on shades of reddish bronze.  This tough native provides good erosion control and a good choice for green roofs.  It is a good choice for roadside planting as it can handle infertile, road salt and polluted soils adjacent to the pavement.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Erica x darleyensis 'Mediterranean Pink' is a Heath that has pink flowers in March and April. It has a low mounded habit and is salt tolerant and evergreen.  It prefers a well-drained site.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Erica x darleyensis 'Mediterranean White' is a Heath that has white flowers in March and April. It has a low mounded habit and is salt tolerant and evergreen.  Does not tolerate "wet feet".

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 6

    A dutiful, no-fuss native perennial great for naturalizing in less-than-ideal conditions! Erigeron pulchellus var. pulchellus ‘Lynnhaven Carpet’ is full-shade tolerant, able to form a dense mat of grey-green foliage topped by showy whitish-pink blooms with yellow centers in mid-May that are great for attracting springtime pollinators. However, it is not the flowers that make ‘Lynnhaven Carpet’ Robin’s plantain the favorite of Mid-Atlantic gardeners: it is, instead, its ability to spread as a low-growing, texturally interesting groundcover over notoriously difficult terrain. And that’s no exaggeration – naturally found in conditions ranging from grassy woodlands with shallow, rocky soils, to streambanks with medium soil moisture, Erigeron pulchellus var. pulchellus ‘Lynnhaven Carpet’ is highly adaptable to a wide variety of habitats. ‘Lynnhaven Carpet’ Robin’s plantain was discovered growing at a private residence near Virginia Beach, VA, named by horticulturist Charles Cresson for its location to the nearby Lynnhaven River.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Big Blue’ Sea Holly is an amazingly different color addition to the well-drained garden. It has silvery green thistle-like foliage which is topped by glowing blue stems and flowers. The blooms in June look like tiny blue artichokes, and are held well above the leaves. The more sun this plant recieves the more intensely colored the blue flowers will be.  Eryngium ‘Big Blue’ withstands salty, coastal winds and sandy soil so a very good choice for seaside plantings. 

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Blue Cap' ('Blaukappe') Sea Holly blooms in July and August, producing silvery blue spiky flowers in abundance.  The unusual cone-shaped blooms are held on thistle-like silvery foliage and are attractive to butterflies and other pollinators.  The flowers dry well and are used for floral arrangements.  Eryngium 'Blue Cap' performs well in hot dry areas and is salt tolerant, so seashore locations are a perfect place for this unusual perennial.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Blue Hobbit' Sea Holly produces silvery blue spiky globe flowers on short stems in summer. The blooms are a very unusual shape and color, emerging from a low mound of green basal foliage. All the Eryngiums must have excellent drainage and do best in dry sites. 'Blue Hobbit' is much more compact than other Eryngiums, so it would work well in the front of a perennial border and also rock gardens. Butterflies love the odd flowers, and happily, deer do not.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Rattlesnake Master is an interesting oddity for unusual perennials borders, with grayish green spiny leaves from which spring its very tall flower spikes in July and August. The blooms are a pale silvery blue and look somewhat like round thistles. Tolerant of both dry and moist conditions, this dramatic looking native got its name from the formerly held theory that its sap cured rattle snake bites. As Dr. Alan Armitage says so succinctly, "Fat chance". Butterflies love it.

    PRN Preferred: The blooms provide a striking architectural note in the landscape, towering over the silvery basal foliage. Very attractive to many pollinators.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Tropical look on zone 6 plant, yes please! 'African Night' Pineapple Lily is a South African native with thick basal foliage and erect flower stems reminiscent of its namesake. Think of Kniphofia on steroids. Eucomis camosa 'African Night' breaks dormancy late spring with near black foliage that ages to a dark green as summer progresses and blooms rosy pink in color late summer into fall. As a result of its heritage, it definitely needs to be planted deep and have a good layer of mulch on top of it through winter.

    Height: 32 Inches
    Spread: 32 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Mistflower is a long blooming native which blooms heavily from August to frost.  Eupatorium coelestinum looks like an Ageratum, as it is crowned with delicate clouds of violet blue flowers.  This is not a plant for the faint-of-heart, as it spreads vigorously to make a good groundcover mat for shady and sunny locations.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Eupatorium 'Baby Joe' is the shortest of the Joe Pye Weeds we've seen so far and the beautiful, profuse clusters of mauve pink flowers show that it has not sacrificed flower-power for reduced height. It performs well in both wet and regular sites, and blooms from July through August. Introduced by Future Plants. Eupatorium dubium has now been renamed 'Eutrochium' by botanists.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The mauve pink flower clusters of 'Little Joe' Joe Pye Weed appear in July and August. Selected by Steve Lighty and introduced by Conard-Pyle Company of Pennsylvania. It is also wet site tolerant, and a great butterfly attractant.  (New genus name is Eutrochium)

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Hyssop-leaved Thoroughwort first came to our attention on visiting the High Line Park in NYC in August where its clouds of delicate flat-topped white flowers were truly amazing amongst the fall grasses and other blooms. Most effective when used in masses, it tolerates dry and sandy conditions well. Seeds vigorously. 

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Phantom' Joe Pye Weed was hybridized by Herbert Oudshoorn of Holland to produce a compact but heavily flowering Eupatorium.  The flower clumps emerge wine red in July, and mature to a strong pink.  The shorter size produces stronger stems supporting the showy compound flowers, which are an attractive addition to a cut flower arrangement.  This tough native is a great butterfly attractant in mid to late summer, and it also is deer resistant. (New genus name is Eutrochium)

    PRN Preferred:  All the great attributes of a Joe Pye Weed but a more compact form.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    ‘Golden Glory’ Wood Spurge produces brilliant chartreuse flower clumps in April. The foliage of Euphorbia ‘Golden Glory’ starts as a bronzy reddish purple before the flowers emerge, and the contrast with the chartreuse is amazing. The leaves become bronze during the summer, and then take on fall colors of red, bronze and purple. Since the sap of Euphorbias is highly caustic, ‘Golden Glory’ is completely deer and pest resistant.

    Height: 20 Inches
    Spread: 14 Inches
    Zone: 6

    'Mrs. Robb's Bonnet' Wood Spurge has chartreuse yellow flower bracts in May and green evergreen foliage. Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae is stoloniferous, producing new plants from runners.  Native to woodland margins in Europe, western Asia and the Mediterranean.  It was discovered by botanist Mary Ann Robb near Istanbul, Turkey.  Mrs. Robb brought cuttings and seeds back to her garden in Liphook, Hampshire in a hat box in the late 1800's; hence to common name.  The Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College uses this extensively in dry shade.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Bonfire' Cushion Spurge offers beautiful foliage in addition to the electric, chrome-yellow spring flower bracts. The leaves of this Euphorbia have a combination of orange, red and purple when planted in full sun and the red shades are intensified in the fall.  A compact and mounding habit, 'Bonfire' needs a dry site.  Bred by Mary Ann Faria of Limerock Plant Farm from two unnamed Euphorbia plants, it was introduced by Blooms of Bressingham®.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Cushion Spurge is stunning when in bloom, producing cymes of sulfur yellow bracts at the tips of the stems in April and May. The green foliage is neat and completely pest free, since all Euphorbs have toxic sap that no animal eats. Euphorbia polychroma’s habit is cushion or dome shaped, particularly in full sun. It forms a taproot which helps it handle drought and rocky soils well. The fall color is attractive shades of red. Prune spent flower heads to discourage self-seeding.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Ascot Rainbow’ Martin’s Spurge has semi-evergreen foliage which has yellow and green variegation. In the spring, new foliage emerges with a reddish flush.  Euphorbia x ‘Ascot Rainbow’ produces interesting yellowish green bracts with small red eyes in the actual flowers’ centers in April and May. Since the white sap of Euphorbias is quite toxic, ‘Ascot Rainbow’ makes a good choice for deer issues as long as the drainage is good, and it also has attractive red to orange fall color.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 6

    Euscaphis japonica is called the Korean Sweetheart Tree because of its rose red fruit pods which look like little hearts as they open.  The broad ivory yellow flower panicles appear in June, and are followed by the showy fruit displayed August through September.  When the red pods open, they are made even more showy by revealing large shiny blue-black seeds.  The bark is also attractive, with white striations on the purplish brown coloration.  This was one of Dr JC Raulston's favorite exotic tree introductions.

    Height: 25 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 6

    American Beech is one of our most stately native trees, and also one of the most problematic ones to transplant B&B. As a result, we are growing it in containers so everyone can have a chance to marvel at its beauty in their own landscape. The bark is beautiful all year, maintaining its silver-gray color throughout its lifespan. The summer leaves are a large and glossy dark green, often turning an attractive golden bronze in the fall. The juvenile beeches usually retain their foliage throughout the winter, turning to a soft whitish-tan after the fall. When Fagus grandifolia is mature enough to bear fertile nuts, it is a very important food source for birds and mammals.

    Height: 60 Feet
    Spread: 40 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Narrow green leaves emerge from tan culms in late spring, adding to previous season's foliage.  Vase-shaped, clumping, deer resistant and semi-evergreen.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Elijah Blue' Blue Fescue has short powder blue foliage. It prefers cool weather and shady locations. Seedheads of Festuca glauca 'Elijah Blue' are airy and beautiful. Not usually a long-lived grass, but stunning in the right location.  Native to France, this cold-hardy cultivar was found at the Plantage Nursery on Long Island.

    Height: 10 Inches
    Spread: 10 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Chicago Hardy' Fig has proven to be reliable as far north as Chicago with some protection, so it is an excellent choice for the Mid-Atlantic area.  It is thought to be originally named 'Bensonhurst Purple', and the fruit is sweet and green with a light brownish-purple blush.  Without any protection it will periodically die to the ground but will come back reliably.  With winter protection, you get fruit production much earlier in the summer.  The foliage is large, dramatic and subtly fragrant.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 6

    The bright pink, Astilbe-like flowers of Queen of the Prairie bloom on tall stems in June and July. Filipendula ‘Venusta’ loves wet spots and will colonize a large area slowly. Commonly found in wet meadows throughout North America, its large, attractive foliage makes a textural impact and following its bloom period, attractive brown seedheads are produced and remain showy throughout the end of summer and into fall. A prolific self-seeder, seedheads should be removed if spread is unwanted.