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Pleasant Run Nursery Plant Library - (WHOLESALE ONLY)

Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
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    'Red Midget' Mexican Hat Plant has unusual flowers with drooping orange red petals surrounding the 2" elongated green brown central cones.  The habit is open and airy, with fine green leaves.  The bloom period is mid to late summer, blooming often into fall.  Butterflies love Ratibida, and it is especially effective planted in masses. 'Red Midget' is dry site tolerant and occurs naturally in prairies and meadows.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Prairie Coneflower is a very versatile prairie native, thriving in a wide variety of soil types and moisture levels.  Ratibida pinnata blooms from July to September, producing a wealth of deep yellow coneflowers with reflexed petals and prominent brown cones.  The mature seeds are an excellent food source for finches, so leave the tall stalks standing into fall.  This is a hard working perennial for the back of mixed borders or for massing in meadows.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Meadow Beauty, also known as Handsome Harry, is in the same family as tropical Tibouchina, but it is a hardy native of the Northeast. The bright rose-pink flowers bloom from July to September, held in clumps above the hairy interesting leaves. Rhexia performs best in moist and wet locations, which is where we first saw this on the High Line in NYC. Patrick Cullina first showed it to us.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 12 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Blaauw's Pink' Azalea becomes covered with large salmon-pink hose-in-hose flowers in late spring. A very hardy standby for Northern gardens. A Gable Hybrid and evergreen.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Conversation Piece' Azalea produces very large pink flowers with splotches of red and white coloring over compact evergreen foliage in mid to late May. Its dwarf habit is combined with excellent cold hardiness. Bred by Robert Gartrell at his New Jersey home named 'Robin Hill', from whence come many fine compact Azaleas.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Encore® Autumn Amethyst® (‘Conlee’) Hybrid Azalea blooms in both late spring and early fall, producing large showy flowers in shades of rosy purple. The dark green foliage is evergreen taking on purplish shades in winter. Rhododendron Encore® Autumn Amethyst® should be protected from harsh winter winds, and comes from the Encore® Series hybridized by Robert Lee and Flowerwood Nursery of Mobile, Alabama.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Autumn EmbersHybrid Azalea ('Conleb') is one of the hardiest of this exciting group of fall blooming evergreen Azaleas. The flowers start in July and continue through the fall. The large blooms are a deep orange-red in both single and semi-double forms. The habit is low growing and tight, with dark green disease-resistant leaves. From the breeding work of Robert Lee and introduced by Flowerwood Nursery of Mobile, Alabama.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Autumn Rouge® (‘Conlea’) Hybrid Azalea blooms in both late spring and early fall. The large semi-double flowers are a deep reddish pink. The evergreen foliage is attractive all year, taking on darker shades in winter. Rhododendron Encore® Autumn Rouge® comes from the hybridizing work of Robert E. Lee, introduced and promoted by Flowerwood Nursery in Alabama. Dr. Michael Dirr says that Autumn Rouge® is one of the hardiest Encore® Azaleas.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Autumn Royalty® Hybrid Azalea ('Conlec') produces enormous magenta-purple booms from July through fall. The habit is tight but upright, with dark green evergreen foliage. Rhododendron Encore® Autumn Royalty® was voted “Azalea of the Year” by the American Rhododendron Society.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6
    Rhododendron 'Gibraltar' produces large trusses of brilliant orange flowers in May. The large ruffled flowers have a faint fragrance, and are breathtakingly vivid. A deciduous Knap Hill Azalea hybrid.
    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Girard Crimson' Azalea blooms in May, with 2 1/2" crimson flowers over compact dark green evergreen foliage.  Its leaves take on shades of burgundy in winter, adding another season to its beauty.  From the extensive breeding work by Girard Nurseries in Geneva, Ohio.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5
    'Pleasant White' Azalea has large bright white flowers over deep green evergreen foliage. The flowers open in late spring and cover the plant. Hybridized in Ohio by Girard Nurseries, the producer of so many beautiful and hardy Azaleas and Rhododendrons.
    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 5

    ‘Renee Michelle’ Azalea comes from the prolific hybridizing work of Girard Nurseries in Ohio, and is a beautiful compact evergreen Azalea. The flowers are large and a good clean pink in late spring, over glossy dark green foliage. An added beauty is the fall and winter color, when leaves take on shades of reddish-purple. The winter hardiness is excellent, as Dr. Michael Dirr found in his Illinois winter garden.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Gumpo Pink' Azalea has large soft salmon pink flowers in June over tiny green foliage. The flowers look much bigger than you would expect for the leaf size.  A Satsuki hybrid from Japan. Evergreen.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'Gumpo White' Azalea has large white flowers in June over tiny green foliage. When in bloom, the foliage is obscured by the white blooms.  A Satsuki hybrid from Japan. Evergreen.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 2 Feet
    Zone: 6
    Single crimson-red flowers in May over compact, shiny green foliage which turns an attractive bronze in winter. 'Hino-Crimson' Azalea is a Kurume hybrid. Evergreen.
    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 6

    ‘Klondyke’ Azalea produces large deep yellow flower trusses in May on the ends of the upright branches. The new foliage starts in shades of bronze, turning rapidly to a medium green. The habit of ‘Klondyke’ Azalea is upright and compact. It originated as one of the Knap Hill hybrids.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Hose-in-hose soft pink blooms appear on 'Nancy of Robin Hill' Azalea in mid-May. Foliage is evergreen and dense. This Azalea stays in bloom for an extended period.  Hybridized by Robert Gartrell of New Jersey.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Rhododendron 'PJM' has bronze foliage that turns to purple in fall and winter. Lavender flowers appear in April. A classic small evergreen Rhododendron, found at Weston Nurseries in Massachusetts and named for Peter J Mezitt.  There are also many great cultivars of the original 'PJM', which we also carry when possible.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 4
    One of the best Dexter hybrids, with medium pink flowers with yellow throats blooming in May. Compact habit and excellent sun and wind tolerance make Rhododendron 'Scintillation' one of the finest broadleaf evergreens.
    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    ‘Weston’s Innocence’ Swamp Azalea is a pure white Rhododendron viscosum introduced by Weston’s Nursery in Massachusetts. The graceful white flowers are fragrant and showy, appearing above the deciduous green leaves in May and June. The foliage is mildew resistant and turns shades of reddish burgundy in fall. Birds and pollinators are drawn to this lovely cold tolerant native. Rhododendron ‘Weston’s Innocence’ will light up moist woodland sites in late spring.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 4
    Sweet Azalea has light pink to white fragrant flowers from May through June, displayed over lustrous green leaves. The fall color is shades of red, and often showy. It prefers moist sites and does well along stream banks. Rhododendron arborescens is one of our most hardy native Azaleas.
    Height: 15 Feet
    Spread: 10 Feet
    Zone: 4
    'Marydel' Coast Azalea is a selection of the native Coast Azalea made by the wonderful plantswoman Polly Hill of Massachusetts. Its fragrant flowers are deep pink in bud maturing to a pink-tinged white in April. It is wet site tolerant and deciduous.
    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    ‘Choptank Rose’ Azalea is a lovely combination of both its Native Azalea parents. The fragrant flowers are a combination of rose, white and yellow and make a show in late May and June. ‘Choptank Rose’ does well in moist to wet sites, and naturalizes well in woodland settings. The great plantswoman Polly Hill found it naturally occurring along the banks of the Choptank River in Maryland and Delaware.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5

    As its common and species name imply, Rhododendron atlanticum is a deciduous Azalea that is native to the coastal plain regions of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and along the Eastern seaboard as far south as Georgia. A small-to-medium sized shrub that typically ranges from 2-3’ but can occasionally reach 6’ in height, Coastal Azaleas are also sometimes considered to be Dwarf Azaleas due to their short stature. Light pink to white blooms appear in terminal clusters from April to May and produce a somewhat musky fragrance – in fact, the potent aroma of Rhododendron atlanticum is a sought-after trait for many Azalea breeding programs, and is often used to help cultivate sweet-smelling Azalea varieties. Flowers attract various pollinators including hummingbirds, butterflies and bees. The Azalea Society of America lists this species as one of the seven in the “White Group” category, the majority of which are native to the Eastern United States.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 6

    'My Mary' deciduous Azalea blooms in May, producing clusters of fragrant deep yellow blooms.  The habit is loosely upright, and 'My Mary' lights up woodland settings when in bloom.  This is a complex hybrid, combining excellent qualities from all three parents (austrinum, atlanticum and periclymenoides).  Produced by the late George plantsman George Beasley who named it for his wife.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Choice Cream' deciduous Azalea blooms in May and June.  It is covered with extremely fragrant creamy-yellow flowers which are set off by pink tubes.  This has long been a favorite of our dear friend Steven Kristoph, and has been a show-stopper at The Rutgers Gardens plant sale year after year.  

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Rhododendron austrinum, known commonly as the Florida Azalea or Florida Flame Azalea, is a native woodland shrub that produces clusters of gorgeous, fragrant blooms from April to May which give this plant its namesake. An explosion of yellows, peaches, and orange-reds appear in terminal clusters on top of loose, rangy branches, attracting hummingbirds and butterflies. It is also possible to grow this species as a houseplant. Deciduous foliage takes on a range of yellow and bronze-orange in the fall. Florida Azalea is a Winner of the American Rhododendron Society’s Rhododendron of the Year Award for 2011.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 6

    ‘Millie Mac’ Florida Azalea blooms in May, producing extremely fragrant yellow to orange flowers in delicate clumps. The blooms appear before Rhododendron x ‘Millie Mac’ is fully leafed out, making the plants very showy in semi-shaded areas. This deciduous native Azalea was found in Alabama, and tolerates heat and humidity well, as well as mid Atlantic winters. Enjoy this heavenly fragrance in the May garden.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 5
    Flame Azalea has yellow to orange flowers in May and June, followed by yellow to orange fall color. Rhododendron calendulaceum is great for a mass planting. Deciduous.
    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Camilla's Blush' Piedmont Azalea becomes a large shrub which is covered with fragrant pink tubular flowers in clusters in early May.  Piedmont Azalea does well along stream sides and wet swales.  The habit is stoloniferous, so it eventually makes a large clump.  Hybridizing easily with a number of native Azaleas, Rhododendron canescens is one of the parents of a number of lovely crosses.

    Height: 12 Feet
    Spread: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5

    ‘Boursault’ Catawba Rhododendron blooms in late May and June, producing showy trusses of lavender bell-shaped flowers. The blooms crown the large oblong evergreen leaves, and Rhododendron ‘Boursault’ is a reliable bloomer in the Northeast because of its good cold tolerance. All Catawba Rhododendrons need excellent drainage as well as consistent moisture.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 4

    The white flower trusses of Rhododendron catawbiense 'Chionoides' have yellow centers, and are held above the green-leafed compact plant in May. A tidy, handsome shrub year-round, with attractive, neat evergreen foliage.

    PRN Preferred: A neat compact habit with outsized white flower trusses.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'English Roseum' Catawba Rhododendron has large rose-pink flower trusses in May and June, displayed over large leathery evergreen leaves.  'English Roseum' is upright and somewhat compact in habit, with good tolerance for both heat and cold.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5

    ‘Lee’s Dark Purple’ Catawba Rhododendron has deep purple buds which open to rosy purple trusses in April and May. The dark green leathery leaves are evergreen, making a nice setting for the showy flower clumps. Rhododendron catawbiense ‘Lee’s Dark Purple’ is a native, but its breeder was John Lee of England, who hybridized it in the mid-1800s. The habit is somewhat compact and the cold tolerance is good.

    Height: 7 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Looking for one of the most popular red-flowering Rhododendrons with extreme cold hardiness? Look no further! Rhododendron catawbiense ‘Nova Zembla’ features all of the best possible qualities of an evergreen Rhodie plus the phosphorescent glow of cardinal red blooms with maroon dorsal splotches from April to May. The funnel-shaped flowers are attractive to hummingbirds, as well as butterflies, while the evergreen foliage provides shelter for winter migrating birds. Meaning “New Land”, and referring to the Severnaya Zemlya Island off of the Northern coast of Russia, ‘Nova Zembla’ Hybrid Catawba Rhododendron was bred and cultivated in Holland over a century ago, and selected for its impeccable cold hardiness in the face of severe temperatures (as well as its mind-blowingly awesome blooms). While it’s known to thrive in the face of severe cold climates, it can also tolerate extreme heat and sun exposure.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 4
    Lavender-pink flowers on a disease-resistant, heat and cold tolerant plant. Rhododendron catawbiense 'Roseum Elegans' is a tough, reliable broadleaf evergreen, blooming in May and June dependably, year after year. My favorite nickname I've heard for it is 'Rosie O'Mulligan Roadie'.
    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Rhododendron kaempferi 'Johanna' Azalea has large red flowers, and is one of the best red Azaleas available. Leaves are semi-evergreen. Winter color is a bronzy purple.

    PRN Preferred:  The winter foliage color is just as showy as the spring blooms.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Rhododendron maximum 'Roseum' is sometimes known as 'Mr Blue Stem', a name that has fascinated us until we finally realized that 'Mr' refers to maximum 'Roseum', and 'Blue Stem' refers to the bluish color of the flower stems.  Who knew??  The flower clusters appear in June, and a delicate pink, over leathery evergreen foliage. In our experience R. maximum 'Roseum' is a much easier plant to grow than R. maximum, and later bloom season is a welcome addition to the Rhododendron world.  Makes an excellent hedge in shade.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Roseum Bluestem' Rosebay Rhododendron blooms in late May and early June, producing pinkish lavender trusses over large narrow evergreen foliage.  'Roseum Bluestem' gets its name from the reddish stems, and is a selection by Rarefind Nursery of Jackson, NJ.  Like other selections of Rhododendron maximum 'Roseum', Rhododendron 'Blue Stem' flowers for a long time, in between R. catawbiense and R. maximum bloom time.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5

    ‘Rosy Pink’ Pinxter Azalea is a selection of Rhododendron periclymenoides (formerly nudiflorum). The fragrant early spring flowers are bright pink and borne on upright twiggy stems of deciduous foliage. Rhododendron periclymenoides ‘Rosy Pink’ needs good drainage, but can be found in moist woodlands and margins of swamps. ‘Pinxter’ evidently means ‘Pentacost’ in Dutch (who knew?), which refers to the early spring bloom time.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4
    Pinkshell Azalea has shades of pink flowers in early to mid-May, no fragrance but very showy. Fall color is often an excellent red.
    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Weston's Lollipop' Azalea is a beautiful interspecific hybrid from those great native Azalea breeders of Weston Nurseries in Hopkinton, MA.  The fragrant showy flower trusses are silvery pink with yellow throats in April and May.  Hummingbirds, butterflies and pollinators are drawn to the blooms, and they are eye-catching in full sun and partial shade.  The leaves take on subtle shades of red and orange in fall.  Good drainage is important.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Betty Cummins' Swamp Azalea was found along a New Jersey road by Dave Lewis, who named it after the great Rhododendron breeder Betty Cummins.  The fragrant bright pink flowers appear in June and July over dark green deciduous foliage.  Pollinators and hummingbirds are drawn to them.  Rhododendron viscosum 'Betty Cummins' is an easy to grow native, since it copes with a variety of acid soil condition, from average drainage to swampy sites.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Millennium' Swamp Azalea comes from years of breeding work with deciduous native Azaleas at Weston Nurseries in Massachusetts.  Rhododendron viscosum 'Millennium' produces small fragrant blooms in late May and June, starting with velvety red buds that open to dark pink flower clumps.  The bloom period is a month or more, especially when the spent flowers are deadheaded.  The foliage is green with a glaucous silver underside.  Rhododendron 'Millennium' is happiest in moist, acidic soils in both sun and partial shade.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 5

    ‘Weston’s Ribbon Candy’ Swamp Azalea is a late blooming deciduous Azalea. The flowers are bright pink with white center stripes, and are held in showy trusses above the bluish green leaves. Rhododendron ‘Weston’s Ribbon Candy’ is aptly named, because the bicolored flowers do look like old-fashioned candies. Like other viscosum Azaleas, the fragrance is delicious. The June blooms are followed by good bronzy fall color.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Golden Showers' Deciduous Azalea blooms in July and August, with mildly fragrant multi-hued flowers in shades of yellow, peach and ivory.  The foliage is a glossy green in summer changing for a short time to bronze in fall before dropping.  The habit of 'Golden Showers' starts out low and compact, slowly growing to make a wide patch.  A subtle lovely hybrid from Weston Nurseries in Massachusetts. 

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Chosen for its bright, abundant, and massive clusters of red-purple blooms with deep burgundy-purple splotches on the dorsal petals, Rhododendron ‘Anah Kruschke’ has way more to offer than its dense evergreen foliage and open, multi-stemmed habit. Bred and selected by Oregonian Franz Kruschke and named after his wife, Anah, the hybrid Rhododendron ‘Anah Kruschke’ is the prodigal child of Rhododendron ponticum and Rhododendron ‘Purple Splendor’. With a rather small stature of 5-6’, ‘Anah Kruschke’ Azalea makes an adorable specimen in the woodland garden, an accent planting within the Rhododendron collection, or even a charming border planting that stays evergreen all year with a pop of explosive color from late May into June. The flowers invite both butterflies and hummingbirds to the garden, while rabbits tend to disregard ‘Anah Kruschke’ Azaleas altogether.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Pennsylvania Rhododendron is a late blooming deciduous Azalea resulting from a controlled cross made by Weston Nurseries between R. periclymenoides and tow other named cultivars.  The flowers appear in June and July in shades of deep pink with orange yellow throats.  Our friend Larry Kuser of Fernbrook Nursery recommends it for its great fragrance and its neat compact habit.  The fall color is shades of copper red.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Weston's Lemon Drop' is a lovely hybrid (viscosum x unknown) deciduous Azalea from Weston Nurseries' extensive breeding work.  The buds are peach colored, and open to a soft yellow in May and June.  The flowers of this interspecific hybrid are fragrant, and the bluish green foliage turns reddish maroon in fall.  The Mezzit family of Hopkinton, MA has contributed a huge number of excellent Rhododendrons to the gardening world, and this one is one of the best ones.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Tangerine Delight' Hybrid Flame Azalea is a result of a beautiful cross between R. calendulaceum and a Knaphill Azalea.  The habit is mounded with deciduous foliage, topped by large showy clusters of fragrant orange and peach colored flowers in May and June.  Although eventually large, Rhododendron 'Tangerine Delight' has dense branching, and would make an excellent hedge as well as a large specimen.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Compact Korean Azalea blooms heavily in May and is covered with light lavender purple slightly fragrant flowers.  The green leaves turn shades of orange and burgundy in the fall, and persist throughout most of the winter.  Rhododendron poukhanense 'Compacta' has dark purple specks at the base of the petals, which may be one of the reasons bees are attracted to the flowers.  Some fall blooming can occur.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Gro-Low' Fragrant Sumac has brilliant red fall foliage. An introduction from Synnestvedt Nursery, its summer foliage is green and somewhat lustrous. A good choice for dry locations, urban sites and banks, especially in deer infested areas. Rhus aromatica 'Gro-Low' is great for parking lot islands because it is so tough and salt tolerant.

    PRN Preferred:  This is an indestructible multi season groundcover.  A real problem solver for tough sites.

    Height: 2 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 3

    'Creel's Quintet' Shining Sumac is a compact, landscape-worthy variety of this tough native plant.  It has the beautiful burgundy-red coloration of the species, but it reaches a maximum height of only 8 to 10'.  Its habit is suckering, so the clump will get wide eventually.  Since it is a female form, the fruit it produces is an important food source in the winter for both birds and mammals.  Mike Creel of Lexington, SC introduced it, and the "Quintet" refers to its set of 5 glossy leaflets per leaf, as opposed to the 9 or more produced on the species Rhus copallina.  In the summer, the creamy yellow flower spikes add to the beauty of this dry site tolerant plant.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Lanham's Purple' Shining Sumac is a mid sized selection with lustrous purple new growth in spring and early summer. By mid summer the color has matured to burgundy-green, and the fall color is a striking combination of purple, red, orange and yellow. It is very tolerant of poor dry sites, and colonizes banks, hillsides and rocky areas well with its suckering habit. It was found by the late Gary Lanham of Kentucky.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5
    Smooth Sumac has shiny young stems supporting the long green pinnate leaves which have glaucous undersides. The fall color is spectacular yellow-orange-red, and the leaf petioles are often a showy red as well. Rhus glabra is extremely tough, prospering in dry, infertile sites as well as good sites. Excellent for mass planting and hillsides because of its suckering habit.
    Height: 15 Feet
    Spread: 15 Feet
    Zone: 3
    Cutleaf Smooth Sumac has delicately dissected dark green leaves which turn orange-red in fall. The petioles are an attractive red in summer as well. It has a suckering habit and great tolerance for dry, poor soil sites.
    Height: 10 Feet
    Spread: 12 Feet
    Zone: 3

    Cutleaf Staghorn Sumac has brilliant orange-red fall foliage with striking lacy leaves on fuzzy stems. Upright red fall seed clumps provide important food for many birds in winter. Rhus typhina 'Laciniata' ('Dissecta') is very tolerant of dry poor soils.

    Height: 15 Feet
    Spread: 10 Feet
    Zone: 3

    First Editions® Tiger Eyes® ('Bailtiger') Staghorn Sumac has chartreuse and brilliant yellow finely dissected leaves with red stems. Rhus typhina Tiger Eyes® has striking orange and red fall foliage, and is an exciting new native for tough sites, from Bailey Nurseries in Minnesota. Prefers a dry site.

    PRN Preferred:  Amazing foliage color both summer and fall, especially good in dry sites.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 3

    ‘Purple Robe’ Black Locust produces 4” pendant racemes of lavender purple fragrant flowers in May and June. The actual flowers are pea-shaped, and like other members of the pea family (Fabaceae), Robinia ‘Purple Robe’ is very adaptable because of its nitrogen-fixing abilities. The pinnate leaves emerge a somewhat bronzy red in spring, rapidly maturing to green. Like other Black Locusts, ‘Purple Robe’ can produce suckers which should be removed. Introduced by  William E. Silva in 1964.

    Height: 30 Feet
    Spread: 20 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Rodgersia pinnata ‘Bronze Peacock’ is sure to add drama to the part shade garden with its large, glossy, dark bronze foliage in areas with consistent moisture. Introduced and developed by Harini Korlipara of Terra Nova Nurseries, Rodgersia pinnata ‘Bronze Peacock’ is the naturally occurring form produced by tissue culture taken from Rodgersia pinnata ‘Ideal’ specimens. This Rodgersia produces lovely palmate foliage in the mid-May that emerges as a bronze-purple and becomes a dark, glossy green with a bronze leaf margin during the summer months – the darkest of all Rodgersia foliage! Attractive pink plumes akin to Astilbe flowers arrive between June and early August, standing upright above the plant’s compact form. While the flowers remain as attractive seedheads into the fall, the real star of the show throughout the growing season is the foliage.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 26 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Rohdea japonica or Sacred Lily has broad strap-like evergreen leaves which look exotic, especially when topped by red winter berries in clumps. The fruit lasts for up to 5 months. A hard-to-find, long-lived and tough perennial.

    Height: 12 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 6

    America™ ('JACclam') Rose has fragrant coral pink double flower over clean foliage. It reblooms well in the fall.

    Height: 12 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Cloud 10™ ('Radclean') Climbing Rose produces pure white double flowers in spring and fall.  The foliage is highly disease resistant and an attractive glossy green.  The large blooms resemble English Roses and are attractive to pollinators.  Rosa Cloud 10™ come from the hybridizing work of Will Radler and can be grown as a very large shrub as well as a mid sized climber.

    Height: 8 Feet
    Zone: 5

    One of the newer exciting children of the Knock Out® program, Coral Knock Out® (formerly Carefree Celebration™), has double coral orange flowers all summer until frost. It has the same wonderful disease resistance that its other siblings have. From William Radler.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4

    'Don Juan' Rose has deep crimson double flowers and is very fragrant. It reblooms well with clean shiny foliage.  It is the result of a cross between a seedling 'New Dawn' and 'New Yorker'.

    Height: 12 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Double Knock Out® ('Radtko') Rose is another amazing Rose from the Knock Out® series, with double cherry-red flowers all summer into fall, as well as the beautiful foliage of its parent, Knock Out®.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'Golden Showers' Climbing Rose was an AARS® Award winner in 1957, so it has clearly stood the test of time.  The clear yellow semi-double flowers are fragrant and attract butterflies and pollinators.  They age to cream, with the new yellow flowers emerging throughout the summer until the first frosts.  Rosa 'Golden Showers' is a vigorous disease resistant rose which performs reliable throughout the summer, and it has the added advantage of having very few thorns.  Removing spent flowers encourages a heavier rebloom.

    Height: 10 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Knock Out® ('Radrazz') Rose has cherry-red semi-double flowers on beautiful bronzy new growth and disease-free dark green foliage. A tremendous plant introduced by William Radler. It will never stop blooming for you throughout the summer and fall.

    Height: 6 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Knock Out® 'White' ('Radwhite') Rose is another winner from William Radler. The glistening single white flowers cover the dark green disease-resistant foliage. Michael Bowell of 'Create a Scene' in Pennsylvania accurately likens the flower form to American Dogwood flowers.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    'New Dawn' Rose has small pink fragrant double flowers, great hardiness and is a good rebloomer. Per Stephen Scaniello, who knows all things rose-related, this was the first plant ever patented in the USA.  It also showed good salt tolerance through the recent hurricanes on the Jersey shore.

    Height: 20 Feet
    Zone: 5

    One of the newest releases from William Radler. Pink Double Knock Out® ('Radtkopink') Rose is a bubblegum-pink Rose that has all the foliage attributes of its Knock Out® siblings and it's a double. Blooms all summer into the fall.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Pink Drift® ('Meijocos') Rose starts blooming in late spring and continues producing flowers all summer into fall.  This neat, compact groundcover is covered with single pink blooms which are rendered more interesting by the white centers and yellow stamens.  The foliage, like the other Drift® Series Roses we carry, is clean, green and disease resistant.  Another introduction from Meilland Roses of France.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Fluorescent pink single to semi-double flowers on disease-free foliage, Pink Knock Out® ('Radcon') Rose has bronze new growth. Found by Conard-Pyle Nurseries, it blooms without stopping all summer.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Popcorn Drift® ('Novarospop') is a great addition to the Drift® Groundcover Rose series.  The clusters of yellow buds open to creamy white semi-double blooms, resembling buttered popcorn in color.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Red Drift® ('Meigalpio') is a double scarlet red.  A compact Rose that reblooms and is easy to grow.  Works well dotted in perennial borders, draped over rock walls or used in mass plantings. 

    PRN Preferred:  Covered with flowers for an extended period of time.  A real work horse in the garden. 

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Sunny Knock Out® ('Radsunny') Rose is another long-awaited winner from William Radler's Knock Out® program, with single bright yellow flowers and the disease resistant foliage of its siblings. It blooms all summer, and the color is deeper in cooler weather.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 5

    Sweet Drift® ('Meiswetdom') has double clear pink blossoms. It has a beautiful strong fragrance, particularly in the evening.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    White Drift® ('Meizorland') Rose is a new ever blooming groundcover introduction with loads of diminutive white double flowers from early summer into fall.  Like the other Drift® series of compact roses, White Drift® has excellent disease resistance.  Excellent for rock gardens, flower bed borders and containers.

    Height: 18 Inches
    Spread: 30 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Zephirine Drouhin' Rose has cerise pink semi-double flowers which are very fragrant. The stems are virtually thornless. It reblooms in the fall.

    PRN Preferred:  A long lasting climber with virtually no thorns!

    Height: 8 Feet
    Zone: 6

    Carolina Rose is a tough native Rose, blooming in May with bright pink fragrant single flowers.  Found in glades, swamps and pastures, Rosa carolina spreads by suckers to form a large patch eventually.  The vivid pink blossoms are followed by red hips in the fall which are a good source of food and vitamin C for birds.  Like most native Roses, Carolina or Pasture Rose is more disease resistant than most commercial Roses, including Rose Rosette disease.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 8 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Rosa palustris, known commonly as Swamp Rose, is a deciduous shrub that produces lovely, fragrant, light pink to medium pink five-petalled flowers with yellow centers throughout June and into July. Swamp Rose is native to wet sites, swamps, and bogs throughout much of North America to the East of the Rockies, with a broad list of faunal associations and high ecological value for many insects in their larval stage. Bright red rose hips appear in late summer to early fall, when they are enjoyed by various mammals and birds. Lush green foliage takes on shades of reds and yellows in the Autumn, making this shrub a multi-seasonal star in the rain or wetland garden.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 4

    Rugosa Rose has single magenta-pink highly fragrant flowers June through August, followed by large, bright orange rose hips in fall. Excellent colonizer of salty, sandy locations. The fruit is highly attractive to wildlife, but deer tend to leave the plants alone (too spiny).

    PRN Preferred:  A Rose that is both deer resistant and extremely fragrant.

    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 3

    ‘Purple Pavement’ ('Rotesmeer') Rugosa Rose produces fragrant ruffled semi-double reddish purple flowers for an extended period all summer. The suckering habit makes Rosa Rugosa ‘Purple Pavement’ a good choice for a groundcover on slopes, especially since the showy flowers are followed by attractive red rosehips in the fall. ‘Purple Pavement’ was introduced by Karl Baum of Germany in the 1980

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 4 Feet
    Zone: 3
    Rosa rugosa 'Alba' flowers from June through August, with single white very fragrant flowers. The blooms are followed by attractive orange hips and good foliage fall color. Very salt tolerant.
    Height: 5 Feet
    Spread: 5 Feet
    Zone: 3

    'Snow Pavement' ('Schneckoppe') Rose has semi-double fragrant white flowers, followed by bright red rose hips in the fall. The blooms start out pale pink in bud, and retain some delicate pink in the petals before maturing to white.  Excellent salt tolerance, reblooms well. Makes a compact shrub or groundcover Rose. Hybridized in Germany.

    Height: 3 Feet
    Spread: 3 Feet
    Zone: 3

    Rosa virginiana has fragrant single pink blooms in June on long prickly branches with glossy green leaves. Fall color is an attractive orange, red and yellow, accented by shiny red rose hips remaining into winter. Salt and seashore loving.  Rose Rosette resistant per Bill Barnes.

    Height: 4 Feet
    Spread: 6 Feet
    Zone: 3

    Creeping Raspberry is a fast growing groundcover with leathery green leaves with small white flowers in late spring. They are followed by red fruit in late summer. The evergreen foliage turns reddish burgundy in the fall and winter. The rapid, dense growth of Rubus calycinoides makes it particularly effective for erosion control or for cascading over walls.

    Height: 6 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 6

    ‘American Gold Rush’ Black-eyed Susan is similar to Rudbeckia ‘Goldsturm’, but is much more disease resistant in humid, hot summers. The yellow daisy-like flowers have striking black center cones, and the bloom period extends from early July until late summer. This selection was made by Brent Horvath of Intrinsic Perennials. Like ‘Goldsturm’, Rudbeckia x ‘American Goldrush’ spreads to make a large patch eventually, but with beautiful clean foliage. Best in full sun. 2021 PHS Gold Medal Plant.

    PRN Preferred: The deep yellow flowers are produced for most of the summer over disease resistant foliage.

    Height: 26 Inches
    Spread: 44 Inches
    Zone: 4

    One of the best varieties of Black-Eyed Susan is Rudbeckia fulgida var. deamii because of its excellent disease resistance and great flower production.  The dark yellow daisy-like blooms appear in July through early September, and the showy golden petals are set off by the chocolate brown cones.  Rudbeckia deamii's fuzzy green leaves are clean and neat, and the heavily branched flower display covers the clump when in bloom.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    The yellow flowers of Black-Eyed Susan are later blooming than R. 'Goldsturm', extending the Black-Eyed Susan period up until frost. More wild and natural looking than the cultivars.  Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida seeds vigorously, and makes a wonderful filler for natural areas.  Birds depend on the seeds for winter food.

    PRN Preferred:  Looks more natural and blooms for a long time.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    'Goldsturm' Black-Eyed Susan has yellow-gold flowers in June and July, making a wonderful display when planted in groups. It spreads to make a large mass eventually, so it can be used as a tall groundcover. Was found in a Czechoslovakia nursery in 1937. 1999 Perennial Plant of the Year.  Seeds are an important winter bird food source.

    Height: 24 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 4

    'Little Goldstar' Black-Eyed Susan has a shorter sturdier habit than R. 'Goldsturm', which makes it much more useful for smaller spaces, as well as summer and fall mixed containers. Butterflies love the blooms and afterwards finches love the seed heads. Since it comes from tissue culture, it is very uniform in masses. A Jelitto Seed introduction.

    Height: 16 Inches
    Spread: 16 Inches
    Zone: 4

    Black-Eyed Susan is considered a biennial, but since it seeds so readily, Rudbeckia hirta does not disappear from the garden. This native wildflower has deep yellow petals surrounding a black cone, which are an important food source for pollinators and songbirds,  such as the goldfinch.  It is the larval host plant of the Silvery Checkerspot butterfly and attracts a specialist Mining bee.  Over the winter, their seeds provide food for songbirds, such as the goldfinch.

    Height: 30 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3
    'Indian Summer' Coneflower has very large yellow Black-Eyed Susan flowers which are produced all summer from the beginning of June. Although it does overwinter on occasion, this plant should be considered an annual. However, it reseeds itself easily so it does not disappear from the garden, and the beautiful long-stemmed blooms make excellent cut flowers.
    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 7

    A native flowering perennial that’s as beloved by gardeners as it is by the birds, bees, and butterflies! Rudbeckia laciniata is a North American herbaceous perennial known for inhabiting open woods, meadows, and disturbed areas such as roadsides. This incredibly versatile, fast-growing wildflower will colonize quickly to give the pollinator or native garden a naturalized look, when in mid-summer to mid-fall, usually from July to October, bright yellow flowers with green centers appear anywhere from 3’ to 10’ above the basal foliage. The broadly lobed leaves that give this perennial its common name, Cutleaf Coneflower, begin to appear in the late spring, creating a rather dense but attractive groundcover of foliage until the blooms appear in late summer. Young leaves can be harvested as a delicious edible green, which the Cherokee called “sochan” – its bright, mild flavor is perfect for adding to salads, sautéing with beans or other veggies, or using as a substitute in endless recipes calling for greens. Following the flowering period, seedheads serve as a great food source for hungry birds throughout fall and winter, while small basal foliage remains persistent through cold weather to give a semi-evergreen groundcover feeling to floor of the garden. Rudbeckia laciniata received the NC Wildflower of the Year Award in 1995, spearheaded by the North Carolina Botanical Garden.

    Height: 40 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Rudbeckia laciniata ‘Autumn Sun’ is the perfect vertical solution to the back of the border garden! This Cutleaf Coneflower is a long-blooming perennial producing bright, golden yellow flowers from July through September, that stand anywhere from 4’ to 7’ tall at maturity. The abundance of attractive blooms invites a plethora of pollinators, including various bee, skipper, and butterfly species, such as the revered Monarch butterfly. If spent flowerheads are left to persist on the plant following its bloom period, songbirds such as the American Goldfinch can be found enjoying the nutritious seeds. Despite its tall stature, this particular selection manages to remain upright in areas with good drainage, and doesn’t typically require staking.

    Height: 60 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Rudbeckia maxima has huge powder blue leaves (hence the common name 'Dumbo Ears') topped by yellow cone flowers in June and July.  The flower stalks rise to over 7' tall.   Rudbeckia maxima prefers moist, fertile soils but will thrive in average garden conditions in full sun.  It likes wet feet, yet is surprisingly drought tolerant.  Foliage is striking and almost tropical looking, like a blue-green Canna.  Seeds are an important winter bird food source.

    Height: 72 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    Sweet Coneflower is a beautiful native Black Eyed Susan that tolerates heavy clay soils and blooms heavily from mid summer to early fall. The deep yellow daisy-like flowers have purple-brown cones which are a great food source for butterflies and insects. They smell sweetly of anise and make a great filler for the back of perennial beds or along the edges of woodlands. Rudbeckia subtomentosa can be used along stream beds and in rain gardens as well.

    Height: 48 Inches
    Spread: 40 Inches
    Zone: 5
    'Henry Eilers' Sweet Coneflower blooms in August and September, with loads of interesting quill-petalled yellow flowers. The small cones have dark brown centers and the contrast is striking. A wonderful addition to tall meadow landscapes. The foliage has a subtle anise fragrance. Introduced by North Creek Nurseries.
    Height: 60 Inches
    Spread: 36 Inches
    Zone: 5

    'Little Henry' Sweet Coneflower has the quilled yellow petals surrounding the brown cones of 'Henry Eiler', but the unusual flower display comes with a much shorter stature.  The daisy-like flowers are produced in mid summer to early fall, and bright yellow petals are "quilled", or rolled up like tiny tubes.  They cover the green anise smelling foliage and are held on strong, non-flopping stems.  An introduction from Terra Nova Nurseries.

    Height: 40 Inches
    Spread: 24 Inches
    Zone: 5

    ‘Blackjack Gold’ Three-lobed Coneflower starts blooming in mid summer and continues into early fall. The deep yellow rounded petals surround black cones, covering the green foliage for a longer time than many Rudbeckias. The flowers are somewhat smaller and borne on sturdy stems, making Rudbeckia triloba ‘Blackjack Gold’ a good cut flower. Introduced by Jelitto Seed, ‘Blackjack Gold’ is considered a biennial  which reseeds in gardens but can overwinter well if deadheaded before fall.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    ‘Prairie Glow’ Three-lobed Coneflower produces bicolored daisy-like flowers. The delicate gold petals have red eyes surrounding the black cones. The bloom period of Rudbeckia triloba ‘Prairie Glow’ starts in July and continues into early fall, especially if deadheaded. Three-lobed Coneflowers are an important food source for native bees, beetles and butterflies because of the long flowering season. A biennial, ‘Prairie Glow’ seeds readily in meadows, gardens and sunny disturbed areas like roadsides.

    Height: 36 Inches
    Spread: 18 Inches
    Zone: 3

    Wild Petunia is a tough, lovely grassland native which produces lavender-blue petunia-like flowers for an extended period in mid summer. It tolerates dry locations very well, thriving in short meadows and along woodland edges. Hummingbirds, moths and butterflies are drawn to the showy flowers.  It is the host plant of the Buckeye Butterfly and visited by numerous bees, and also Syrphid flies. Will self-seed.  

    Height: 2 Feet
    Zone: 4
Botanical Name     Common Name
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